Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Building a computer (hardware novice) Watch

    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lukely)
    You can get Windows 7 OEM on Amazon.co.uk for £70. Just search Windows 7 OEM.

    You might find with a motherboard change though that the license is no longer valid, and given that most custom-build PCs are designed to last, that could be an issue.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TShadow383)

    http://i53.tinypic.com/t9e9ah.png

    This is my recommendation for a budget like yours.
    If you can afford to spend the full £600 on hardware then I'd recommend a 5850.
    perfect.
    do you know where i could get a cheap copy of windows 7? also would it be viable to use my 32" tv as a monitor for a while before i buy one?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jampolo)
    perfect.
    do you know where i could get a cheap copy of windows 7? also would it be viable to use my 32" tv as a monitor for a while before i buy one?
    Sit in front of your 32" TV (like right in front of it). How do you think you'd feel staring at that for hours? So theoretically, sure, in practice not really.

    Think about it, why exactly are you buying a new PC? If all you wanted was something that ran WOW fast you could spend £200, put settings on low & play fine. No, you want a machine that will play wow on max settings so you can have a better experience. If you have a small low quality screen you won't be able to appreciate the good graphics you paid so much to achieve.



    If you want to get Windows 7 in that then get a worse graphics card. It's overkill for WOW. I have a Nvidia GTS 250 card & can play warcraft on max settings with good frame rates in a raid setting.

    You'll need some cables too. I'm guessing you already have a PC, perhaps use the OS on that for now.

    You can probably save some cash buying parts from different suppliers, check that out.

    EDIT: I'm not sure what shop TShadow383 used but it's quite good. I think his build is better in most parts. The mobo he suggests is expensive, and the CPU cooler is not neccessary. If you cut out those two parts you have £80 extra which you can spend on your monitor.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ewan)
    Sit in front of your 32" TV (like right in front of it). How do you think you'd feel staring at that for hours? So theoretically, sure, in practice not really.

    Think about it, why exactly are you buying a new PC? If all you wanted was something that ran WOW fast you could spend £200, put settings on low & play fine. No, you want a machine that will play wow on max settings so you can have a better experience. If you have a small low quality screen you won't be able to appreciate the good graphics you paid so much to achieve.



    If you want to get Windows 7 in that then get a worse graphics card. It's overkill for WOW. I have a Nvidia GTS 250 card & can play warcraft on max settings with good frame rates in a raid setting.

    You'll need some cables too. I'm guessing you already have a PC, perhaps use the OS on that for now.

    You can probably save some cash buying parts from different suppliers, check that out.

    EDIT: I'm not sure what shop TShadow383 used but it's quite good. I think his build is better in most parts. The mobo he suggests is expensive, and the CPU cooler is not neccessary. If you cut out those two parts you have £80 extra which you can spend on your monitor.
    ok cheers, and do you have fans inside a case ? or is it better to have a CPU cooler.
    32" wont be too practical.. so maybe saving £80 will the best option.
    also havent got a copy of another os as i have a laptop with pre-installed vista and a pre-historic computer (im talking intel pentium 256mb ram...)
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jampolo)
    ok cheers, and do you have fans inside a case ? or is it better to have a CPU cooler.
    32" wont be too practical.. so maybe saving £80 will the best option.
    also havent got a copy of another os as i have a laptop with pre-installed vista and a pre-historic computer (im talking intel pentium 256mb ram...)
    You don't need either. If you find your case is overheating by all means buy a fan or other method of cooling later. I can pretty much guarantee you won't have any immediate problems with that case though (I own it). My system started to have heat problems after a year but that was mostly dirt related.

    Windows 7 is £70 OEM. Perhaps £50-60 on Ebay.

    The case has one fan & room for another if required.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ewan)
    You don't need either. If you find your case is overheating by all means buy a fan or other method of cooling later. I can pretty much guarantee you won't have any immediate problems with that case though (I own it). My system started to have heat problems after a year but that was mostly dirt related.

    Windows 7 is £70 OEM. Perhaps £50-60 on Ebay.

    The case has one fan & room for another if required.
    ok thank you, also on the case side, i guess all cases are generic ?
    as in you can buy whatever parts you want (as long as they are all compatible with eachother) and it will fit in any case?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jampolo)
    ok thank you, also on the case side, i guess all cases are generic ?
    as in you can buy whatever parts you want (as long as they are all compatible with eachother) and it will fit in any case?
    For the most part they will fit yes but you don't want to get a case which is too small. For some cases you need a PSU, for others they are inbuilt. For some you need a fan, for others you don't. Read the description, although often you can save money by buying a case with inbuilt PSU.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ewan)
    For the most part they will fit yes but you don't want to get a case which is too small. For some cases you need a PSU, for others they are inbuilt. For some you need a fan, for others you don't. Read the description, although often you can save money by buying a case with inbuilt PSU.
    ok im just worried that the psu sold with the case is rubbish, as if that blows it can ruin your whole computer.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jampolo)
    ok thank you, also on the case side, i guess all cases are generic ?
    as in you can buy whatever parts you want (as long as they are all compatible with eachother) and it will fit in any case?
    No, they're not, some of the larger CPU coolers will only fit in big cases, and cases all have different hard drive and optical drive options.
    Wire routing is also a consideration, but wire management systems are only normally present on high-end cases.

    Some explanation for the motherboard and CPU cooler I recommend:

    -The motherboard is of extraordinarily high quality (I wouldn't use the one in your first post which lacks mosfet cooling with a quad core, it'll burn out easily), and has various options which would make things easier - it has the lucida hydra chip in it, so it can run multiple graphics cards, and any combination of ATI/Nvidia cards, so it's great for any future upgrade you may have in mind. It also has an auto-overclocking feature, which is good for beginners, and the overclocking on the msi boards is actually pretty good. You won't get the sort of speeds you'd get doing it manually (4.2Ghz should be in range with a cooler like the frio) but you'll get 3.7-3.9Ghz easily.
    Also, intel isn't changing their cooling hole spacing for LGA1155 at least, so in the near term if you decide to change platform or anything you can move the cooler over onto the new system. Aftermarket cooler manufacturers are generally pretty good about releasing new brackets for new socket types too, so if intel or AMD do change their spacings at all you should be able to buy a new bracket for a few pounds.

    Also, the site I've used is overclockers.co.uk
    A word of advice if you do buy from them: If you have a problem, don't bother with the email system. Call them. They're really good over the phone, but their email support isn't great, and gets them their fair share of bad reviews online.

    I have a good working relationship with them though, I've sourced at least £30k in parts from them in the last year.

    Oh one final thing - Don't bother with OEM windows 7 - the license doesn't allow for motherboard replacement, whereas with a retail copy when you eventually do decide to switch processor/motherboard you can keep using your original copy and just re-activate. So you can save £20 now, or save £80 in a few years. Up to you really...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ewan)
    For the most part they will fit yes but you don't want to get a case which is too small. For some cases you need a PSU, for others they are inbuilt. For some you need a fan, for others you don't. Read the description, although often you can save money by buying a case with inbuilt PSU.
    The PSUs which come bundled with most cases are horribly shoddy.
    The antec ones and most of the coolermaster ones aren't bad, but they're very much the exception to the rule.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TShadow383)
    The PSUs which come bundled with most cases are horribly shoddy.
    The antec ones and most of the coolermaster ones aren't bad, but they're very much the exception to the rule.
    Probably true, fair enough.

    Tech people always seem to come up with all these future proofing & overclocking arguments. It came up when I made a thread on here for advice about my current PC (over a year ago now).

    Is a novice likely to overclock their PC? Do they need to overclock their PC? Overclocking his system isn't going to make any noticeable difference playing WOW that's for sure :p:

    As for future proofing. Probably a good idea if you're likely to replace parts every year. Not so much of a good idea if you only think you'll replace stuff every 4 years.

    Wrt the mobo, he needs to decrease costs somewhere. We'd all love the best mobo in the world, but where else would you recommend he skimps on costs?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    ok thank you very much, i will post an updated build soon
    thank you for your help Ewan and tshadow383!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TShadow383)

    http://i53.tinypic.com/t9e9ah.png

    This is my recommendation for a budget like yours.
    If you can afford to spend the full £600 on hardware then I'd recommend a 5850.

    this comes to 572.94

    Took your build, changed it a bit because of price, just need your word on any obvious bottlenecks/faults or incompatabilities. If it all goes together and you feel its ok then i'll most likely go ahead with it. also overclockers are so much cheaper than dabs, and they use paypal
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    It's not that hard to build a PC, but what do you think is going to be the most reliable ?

    A PC built by an experienced computer tech or by somebody who knows nothing and just throws the parts together and hopes it works ?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jampolo)

    this comes to 572.94

    Took your build, changed it a bit because of price, just need your word on any obvious bottlenecks/faults or incompatabilities. If it all goes together and you feel its ok then i'll most likely go ahead with it. also overclockers are so much cheaper than dabs, and they use paypal
    Don't for the love of god buy that motherboard.
    I got asked to do a build with a very similar gigabyte board about a year ago, it blew after two weeks.
    Having no cooling at all for any of the mosfets or other power circuitry, on a board that'll be taking a high end quad core and a relatively power-hungry GPU is just a recipe for disaster.

    I know it's a lot more, but the board I posted earlier in the thread I think is actually better value for money, when you look at the lucida hydra chip in it and all the features it has, as well as the build quality and automatic overclocking facility.

    Another thing to note is that the disk drive and hard drive you've chosen are OEM items, and won't come with SATA cables, so depending on what's bundled with the motherboard you buy (not a lot with those ultra-cheap gigabyte boards) then you may have to order a couble of those too.

    Also if you use the memory kit I suggested earlier, it's just as fast (probably a tad faster) and £10 cheaper.
    I take it the 5770 offer's expired too?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TShadow383)
    Don't for the love of god buy that motherboard.
    I got asked to do a build with a very similar gigabyte board about a year ago, it blew after two weeks.
    Having no cooling at all for any of the mosfets or other power circuitry, on a board that'll be taking a high end quad core and a relatively power-hungry GPU is just a recipe for disaster.

    I know it's a lot more, but the board I posted earlier in the thread I think is actually better value for money, when you look at the lucida hydra chip in it and all the features it has, as well as the build quality and automatic overclocking facility.

    Another thing to note is that the disk drive and hard drive you've chosen are OEM items, and won't come with SATA cables, so depending on what's bundled with the motherboard you buy (not a lot with those ultra-cheap gigabyte boards) then you may have to order a couble of those too.

    Also if you use the memory kit I suggested earlier, it's just as fast (probably a tad faster) and £10 cheaper.
    I take it the 5770 offer's expired too?
    Yeh the 5770 offer expired
    Your a godsend, will change the motherboard, if i can tone down on a few other things i will try and push for that motherboard.
    I take it the case has space for a CPU fan seeing as you put the two together in an earlier build ?
    Will change the disk drive and hard drive to buy sata cables.
    thank you!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: December 17, 2010
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources

    Articles:

    The Student Room tech wikiTech forum guidelines

    Quick link:

    Unanswered technology and computers threads

    Sponsored features:

    Web Legend

    Win a Macbook Air!

    Blog about setting up a website for a chance to win in our Web Legend competition.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.