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    (Original post by caroline147)
    I do Politics & Philosophy (& I also do an Economics module), so I suppose the more quantitative courses may have different teaching standards. I had an AAB offer last year, I received it on March 1st and I'd applied on October 7th: a 5 month wait! Mmm, I don't know too much about sports facilities, to be honest, hopefully someone else can help you more with that. I do know that there are badminton courts, tennis courts and a very cheap gym on campus though, and another gym & a swimming pool at the UofL union in Bloomsbury. Good luck!
    Hi, I've applied for the same course. do you mind telling me what you got at GCSE and your A level results and choices?
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    OP, university is a lottery.

    Yes you can, to a limited extent, determine whether you will enjoy a university or not prior to going there. Open days and talking to relevant people help, but you'll never know until you're a student there. You could decline LSE, go to UCL, but end up in a mostly anti-social hall or in a cliquey part of one and end up pretty dire socially. Equally you could meet your best friend within the first hour of moving into an LSE hall - or at a freshers event, or in your first class. It's important to consider all the angles, but you truly can't predict what things will be like for you because it depends on lots of factors.

    You should also be aware that people at UCL complain about the university being segregated - it's also a considerably bigger university, which makes it a little more impersonal. All top universities are going to be 'less fun' than the mainstream ones since students tend to be more work/career focused and study is so time-consuming. Similarly to LSE, look at the Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, Durham and Warwick forums and you'll find threads spouting similar worries.

    As regards academic work, it's true that we have less support than our counterparts at other top universities. If this is a negative or you feel it will disadvantage you (many openly feel that they need continuous support) than you may struggle at LSE. People here tend to find the positives in the lack of contact hours - free time for independent study, endeavor, entrepreneurship.. or of course, getting drunk and sleeping lots.
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    (Original post by The_Libertarian)
    OP, university is a lottery.

    Yes you can, to a limited extent, determine whether you will enjoy a university or not prior to going there. Open days and talking to relevant people help, but you'll never know until you're a student there. You could decline LSE, go to UCL, but end up in a mostly anti-social hall or in a cliquey part of one and end up pretty dire socially. Equally you could meet your best friend within the first hour of moving into an LSE hall - or at a freshers event, or in your first class. It's important to consider all the angles, but you truly can't predict what things will be like for you because it depends on lots of factors.

    You should also be aware that people at UCL complain about the university being segregated - it's also a considerably bigger university, which makes it a little more impersonal. All top universities are going to be 'less fun' than the mainstream ones since students tend to be more work/career focused and study is so time-consuming. Similarly to LSE, look at the Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, Durham and Warwick forums and you'll find threads spouting similar worries.

    As regards academic work, it's true that we have less support than our counterparts at other top universities. If this is a negative or you feel it will disadvantage you (many openly feel that they need continuous support) than you may struggle at LSE. People here tend to find the positives in the lack of contact hours - free time for independent study, endeavor, entrepreneurship.. or of course, getting drunk and sleeping lots.
    I perfectly understand what you're saying . I'm just trying to gather as much info as I can before making a decision. To be fair, I don't see the support issue as a big problem.....when it comes to independent study I'm pretty beastly . Plus I thought the whole point of university was independent study and collaboration in an acedemic environment.
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    (Original post by Vanessa2010)
    Hi, I've applied for the same course. do you mind telling me what you got at GCSE and your A level results and choices?
    Um, okay
    GCSEs: 8A*s 2As
    A-levels (self-taught): A*A*AAABd (Maths, Physics, Philosophy, English Lit, Economics, Politics & History AS respectively)
    UCAS: Oxford PPE (rejected), Durham PPE (offer), York PPE (offer), Exeter Philosophy & Political Economy (offer, insurance choice) & LSE PolPhil

    Hope that's helpful, feel free to ask any more questions
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    Thanks for your reply, I wasnt expecting one.

    Do you have an idea of the average grades that are necessary to get in.
    I am predicted A*A*A.

    I applied for PPE also, offer from manchester, rejection from Oxford.
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    (Original post by caroline147)
    Um, okay
    GCSEs: 8A*s 2As
    A-levels (self-taught): A*A*AAABd (Maths, Physics, Philosophy, English Lit, Economics, Politics & History AS respectively)
    UCAS: Oxford PPE (rejected), Durham PPE (offer), York PPE (offer), Exeter Philosophy & Political Economy (offer, insurance choice) & LSE PolPhil

    Hope that's helpful, feel free to ask any more questions
    Sorry, i forgot to quote the first time. :confused:

    Thanks for your reply, I wasnt expecting one.

    Do you have an idea of the average grades that are necessary to get in.
    I am predicted A*A*A.

    I applied for PPE also, offer from manchester, rejection from Oxford.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    I'm kinda used to being surrounded by wierdness lol, I go to a state grammar school, and there's a lot of sheltered people, ignorant/prejudiced people, posh middle class people, nerdy introvert people etc...I'd put myself in the "normal" group with a hint of nerdiness hehe, and me and my friends also joke about this n stuff. If witnessing lesbian action is a regular occurance at LSE then I'm defo going there .

    If I'm being honest, I'm not too phased about the prospect of dodgy class teaching methods etc, I reckon I'm clever and motivated enough to handle the independent learning and I've had practice too - the geography department at my school is a complete joke, and so I've taught myself the entire GCSE and A level course over the past 4 years :cool:

    Just a couple of questions.......Do you ever venture quite far from your accomodation when out socialising? London is a massive place so I'm sure quite a lot of people just stick to their local surroundings....at the UCL Geography talk the lecturer said that some 2nd year students proudly told him that they had seen the River Thames, and I'm pretty sure he wasn't joking. I'm all for exploring places when out and about and trying new things, and I don't know if I'd enjoy it if it's the "given thing to do" to just hang about around LSE and its accomodation ALL the time.

    And also, what are the sporting facilities like? I know there's a sports park thingy 30 minutes away on the train, but what about the gym facilities? Is there one on the LSE campus/ near to the campus? Cheers


    I've probably "explored" London more with either old sixth form friends that visit me in London, or with my UCL friend. I've seen pretty much all the touristy things. I come from Norfolk so I was worried about getting lost and dying somewhere in London but it's really not that bad, especially if you have an Oyster card.

    I live at High Holborn, which is in the middle of central London. On a typical night partying or whatever it's usually a short walk down the road to China town or Leicester square. Plenty of Backside friends (south of the river) come along too, though. It's easy to get wherever you want to in London though, via tube, bus or even taxi if you need to. There's bound to be a few amicable sporty people in your halls that organise events and stuff for you, usually to clubs. I don't really like clubbing, but when in Rome I guess... But there can be hall, kitchen (or elevator on one occasion :\) parties if you prefer just hanging out and getting drunk house party style.

    I heard the gym on campus is pretty awful. Never actually been there though. There's a far better albeit it more expensive gym next to high Holborn though so everybody who goes to the a gym in my accommodation uses that.

    The library is pretty impressive. I rarely use it though. I just don't see how it's any different from working in your room? When I do use it, it's only because I have an awkward hour spare inbetween lectures and I use the comfy bean bags to sleep on.
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    (Original post by Vanessa2010)
    Sorry, i forgot to quote the first time. :confused:

    Thanks for your reply, I wasnt expecting one.

    Do you have an idea of the average grades that are necessary to get in.
    I am predicted A*A*A.

    I applied for PPE also, offer from manchester, rejection from Oxford.
    I don't know for sure, but everyone I've spoken about it to here seems to have AAA+ & all but one of us are Oxford PPE rejects, although we don't spend much time discussing that kind of thing :p: Last year, I think everyone on TSR predicted AAB or below got rejected (and many with far higher grades/predictions, too), so the 'required grades' is quite misleading. With 23 applicants per place, they can afford to be picky, I suppose. A*A*A is impressive though, good luck!

    EDIT: The average UCAS tariff is around 500 points, which is A*AAA or the equivalent, I think.
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    I've probably "explored" London more with either old sixth form friends that visit me in London, or with my UCL friend. I've seen pretty much all the touristy things. I come from Norfolk so I was worried about getting lost and dying somewhere in London but it's really not that bad, especially if you have an Oyster card.

    I live at High Holborn, which is in the middle of central London. On a typical night partying or whatever it's usually a short walk down the road to China town or Leicester square. Plenty of Backside friends (south of the river) come along too, though. It's easy to get wherever you want to in London though, via tube, bus or even taxi if you need to. There's bound to be a few amicable sporty people in your halls that organise events and stuff for you, usually to clubs. I don't really like clubbing, but when in Rome I guess... But there can be hall, kitchen (or elevator on one occasion :\) parties if you prefer just hanging out and getting drunk house party style.

    I heard the gym on campus is pretty awful. Never actually been there though. There's a far better albeit it more expensive gym next to high Holborn though so everybody who goes to the a gym in my accommodation uses that.

    The library is pretty impressive. I rarely use it though. I just don't see how it's any different from working in your room? When I do use it, it's only because I have an awkward hour spare inbetween lectures and I use the comfy bean bags to sleep on.
    Yeah I've got to agree that the library is impressive. Although the spiral staircase is tedious as hell, and I only went up and down it once!
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    I'm applying for a course in geography with economics at LSE and have heard a lot of bad stuff about LSE, especially on TSR - poor contact time with professors, the postgrads are poor at teaching undergrads and so you pretty much have to learn the whole course independently, the social life is poor (maybe due to the amount of foreign students who prefer to stick with their own), and this contributes to an experience that does reflect the reputation that LSE holds internationally. My general feeling is that LSE is a factory that churns out very bright undergrads (who have a great capacity to learn independently), and that it focusses very much on postgraduate study (after all, that is the reason why LSE is known as an international social science research powerhouse), much to the detriment of the undergrad experience.

    Is there anyone at LSE who can refute this with their own experiences? I'm also applying to do economics and geography at UCL, and having visited there numerous times (I have an older sibling who goes there), it seems like there is much more scope for opportunity in terms of societies, sports, meeting like minded people etc. If anyone could reply, this would be appreciated so much, I am undecided on where to go. And please could you be honest
    Yes, teaching is often poor. Last year, out of 4 teachers, only 1 of mine was good. This year this figure is 2 for me. You have to do a lot of independent study, I essentially taught myself a couple of modules last year. The online resources tend to be of high quality and of course so is the library, so if you are motivated you will have no issue.

    The social life is not poor. OK, many people choose not to go out, but each year approx 1,200 undergrads start at LSE. Clearly, you will not be the only sociable one. If you get into a good hall, your social life can be as crazy as you want it to be. Mine was! I would say, in second year, I work much harder than my friends at other universities (barring Oxbridge) but that certainly does not mean I don't go out. Second year is a lot more chilled out, but I'm still having a great time. Last year I was out 3-4 times a week, this year it's more like 1 or 2 maximum. But it's still fun.

    LSE is a factory which churns out bright undergrads with fantastic careers ahead of them. But, like I said, you can have it both ways if you choose: you can have a great social life but still come out of LSE with a solid degree and a great career lined up. It's really all about how you balance your social life with your academic commitments. One thing I would point out is the array of career opportunities at LSE: from societies to the careers office itself, you will not be short of events to attend to help you decide which career is for you (most likely banking or consulting ).

    With regard to sports: the AU is quite big at LSE and from what I gather they have crazy social lives. So get involved in that. There is a decent sporting community at LSE.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    Yeah I've got to agree that the library is impressive. Although the spiral staircase is tedious as hell, and I only went up and down it once!
    It is. It looks impressive but actually using it is a nightmare because you tend to always use the same leg to climb of descend so it just feels awkward :\
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    I haven't really read most of this thread, but, as far as teaching woes and such go, it's the same at every university. Seriously. (bar Oxbridge who use a different system and so have different woes)

    People just seem unhappier at LSE because there's less of a let's get pissed/tie someone to a chair on the roof/leave a sleeping friend on a bus to Manchester/**** a fresher culture. It's more of a let's get an investment banking job sort of culture, but there's plenty of fun stuff AT THE SAME TIME. You need to be an open minded person willing to handle intense careers/academic pressure, as well as being able to go out and have fun. And LSE is filled with people who do both, but also contains a minority of people who only manage one of those two things.

    Ditto Vesta on AU culture - if you're into sports, get heavily involved with it.
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    Oi thereal OG quite your whining of course LSE is full of good things and not many bad things.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    Anyone??

    LSE is more prestigious, but since UCL is also very good, if you like it more, go there. Go to the university that will give you the best UG experience all round.

    Okay, not literally, I mean you wouldn't choose London Met over Cambridge if the Cambridge social life was a bit naff but you get the picture.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    I'm applying for a course in geography with economics at LSE and have heard a lot of bad stuff about LSE, especially on TSR - poor contact time with professors, the postgrads are poor at teaching undergrads and so you pretty much have to learn the whole course independently, the social life is poor (maybe due to the amount of foreign students who prefer to stick with their own), and this contributes to an experience that does reflect the reputation that LSE holds internationally. My general feeling is that LSE is a factory that churns out very bright undergrads (who have a great capacity to learn independently), and that it focusses very much on postgraduate study (after all, that is the reason why LSE is known as an international social science research powerhouse), much to the detriment of the undergrad experience.

    Is there anyone at LSE who can refute this with their own experiences? I'm also applying to do economics and geography at UCL, and having visited there numerous times (I have an older sibling who goes there), it seems like there is much more scope for opportunity in terms of societies, sports, meeting like minded people etc. If anyone could reply, this would be appreciated so much, I am undecided on where to go. And please could you be honest
    As a postrgaduate student I just wanted to add that teaching is not better at the MSc level. It is still mostly about self study. You do get some good teachers, but the majority is mainly focused on their reserach.
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    I'm a first year doing the Actuarial Science Bsc course and I think you have summed up all the cons with LSE. But on the bright side, you have summed up all the cons. And that's not to say that LSE is the only university with these problems.

    I might bore you with a few stories of weird **** that has annoyed me at LSE actually.
    My first day, we all head downstairs to shake hands, ask generic questions about what course you're doing, how's life, where you are from, etc a million times over. I was talking to one guy and halfway through the conversation he literally said to me, "I need to find some Asians to talk to". Like, what? Weird.

    A day later I was playing pool with a friend. My friend is talking to some guy, who literally says, word for word to my friend (who's from pakistan) "Yeah, I don't tend to like English people" and he actually points to me as he says it. What?

    After the Actuarial Science induction talk I found myself talking to some girl, and then we head off with her friends to get dinner. And it's all going well, then it suddenly hits me that I have no place here whatsoever because all this group ever talked about, non stop, was who is from where, and how all Indians get on with all philapenies, and what all Chinese people think about it. It was just ridiculous. Like they're obsessed with it, or something. I had nothing to contribute. God, it's just weird. Someone who I was friends with but no longer am, always used to complain to me about "aspirational Indians" or something, as well :\. I look at my friendship groups at LSE now and although I'm usually the only white English guy, my groups are all full of people who grow up in England or who are very English. Not because we're racist at all, because God, we've tried to socialise, but I've come to realise that 's just how LSE and life is, which is awful.

    All the teachers I have are awful and classes are pointless. They go through solutions which are posted up on moodle anyway. I could do that for goodness sake. And all classes are so frustrating because for some reason unknown to me, nobody ever volunteers to answers a general question from the teacher to the class. It’s bull**** because they all know the answers anyway. Why wait literally minutes in completely awkward silence when you have the answer? Just share it so we can move on, for God sake. I used to volunteer answers but I got really sick of it after months, so now I just sit back and let us all die together.

    Lectures are more helpful than classes. LSE was like 3rd overall best university in the Uk according to league tables until they introduced student satisfaction ratings.

    I've only mentioned the bad points though. There are plenty of good points. It's central London so you can live a brilliant life. It not hard to find really good friends to have a great time with. And a degree from LSE does get you places.
    these are weird stories indeed, but at least LSE has a reputation as a tough school where the abundant opportunities for independent study more than make up for any deficiencies in teaching...plus you're in London and can live far away from fellow students and you only need to commute to class for a few lectures a week!
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    (Original post by Black Douglas)
    these are weird stories indeed, but at least LSE has a reputation as a tough school where the abundant opportunities for independent study more than make up for any deficiencies in teaching...plus you're in London and can live far away from fellow students and you only need to commute to class for a few lectures a week!
    Living AWAY from your fellow students is an advantage?

    Abundant oppotunities for independent learning lol? You'd be really good at selling me a peice of **** wouldn't you? I could drop out of uni and read wikipedia all day long and that would be great for my independant learning. Equally as good as paying LSE to teach me, in fact.
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    (Original post by kenpachi88)
    Oi thereal OG quite your whining of course LSE is full of good things and not many bad things.
    Chill bro, I'm just trying to get some info on some things.
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    Living AWAY from your fellow students is an advantage?

    Abundant oppotunities for independent learning lol? You'd be really good at selling me a peice of **** wouldn't you? I could drop out of uni and read wikipedia all day long and that would be great for my independant learning. Equally as good as paying LSE to teach me, in fact.
    perhaps dry humor? but lse can't possibly be as bad as people on TSR and the various student satisfaction surveys make it out to be. independent study is a good thing no doubt.
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    Living AWAY from your fellow students is an advantage?

    Abundant oppotunities for independent learning lol? You'd be really good at selling me a peice of **** wouldn't you? I could drop out of uni and read wikipedia all day long and that would be great for my independant learning. Equally as good as paying LSE to teach me, in fact.
    No you could not.

    It is very common knowledge that the economics entries on Wikipedia are crap.

    It's not like the maths entries. I guess it's because economists understand opportunity cost and mathematicians don't. (or they are just a nicer breed of people...)
 
 
 
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