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    My motivation to pursue a career in Investment Banking is based solely on American Psycho and Wall Street...

    I jest.
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    Chuckling to myself about the guy who thinks the majority of teachers/engineers wouldn't take a job in ib if offered. Wave a £250k salary at someone who has been teaching for £20k for three years and see how many turn it down. I'd be willing to bet my life that >90% of recent graduates would accept the offer.

    Of course work/life balance is a consideration. I turned down offers in ib because of the hours, and one in trading (a market maker) because I didn't want the stress/career risk. But only because I knew I could earn similar money elsewhere.

    Those who can't, teach.
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    (Original post by The IC Guy)
    Chuckling to myself about the guy who thinks the majority of teachers/engineers wouldn't take a job in ib if offered. Wave a £250k salary at someone who has been teaching for £20k for three years and see how many turn it down. I'd be willing to bet my life that >90% of recent graduates would accept the offer.

    Of course work/life balance is a consideration. I turned down offers in ib because of the hours, and one in trading (a market maker) because I didn't want the stress/career risk. But only because I knew I could earn similar money elsewhere.

    Those who can't, teach.
    I don't think you're far off the mark, money is so hugely tempting for people. Thing is, if this hypothetical 90% of teachers/engineers took this IB job, how many of them would still be in IB after 3 years, do you think?
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    (Original post by Zürich)
    ''first you get the money then you get the power, then you get the women''
    Precisely.
    TSR is obsessed with investment banking.
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    lol I thought this thread would be about the International Baccalaureate...

    My life is IB.
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    (Original post by The IC Guy)
    Chuckling to myself about the guy who thinks the majority of teachers/engineers wouldn't take a job in ib if offered. Wave a £250k salary at someone who has been teaching for £20k for three years and see how many turn it down. I'd be willing to bet my life that >90% of recent graduates would accept the offer.

    Of course work/life balance is a consideration. I turned down offers in ib because of the hours, and one in trading (a market maker) because I didn't want the stress/career risk. But only because I knew I could earn similar money elsewhere.

    Those who can't, teach.
    I'm one of those who would certainly turn down a job in IB in the unlikely event that I was offered one. I don't see the appeal. I want a job that helps people. IB is just about money - there may be more to it than that, but I can't see any value in the job and as money doesn't motivate me I'd far rather have a lower paid job where I'm actually making a difference than being in IB or something similar where I'm selling my soul and working long hours.

    Perhaps I'm just overly idealistic. As I say, there may be more to IB than my perception of it, and I'd be interested to see if anyone is in for reasons other than the perceived prestige or the money (although nowadays I wouldn't say there's as much prestige in banking type careers after the global financial crisis).
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    (Original post by d123)
    I'm one of those who would certainly turn down a job in IB in the unlikely event that I was offered one. I don't see the appeal. I want a job that helps people. IB is just about money - there may be more to it than that, but I can't see any value in the job and as money doesn't motivate me I'd far rather have a lower paid job where I'm actually making a difference than being in IB or something similar where I'm selling my soul and working long hours.

    Perhaps I'm just overly idealistic. As I say, there may be more to IB than my perception of it, and I'd be interested to see if anyone is in for reasons other than the perceived prestige or the money (although nowadays I wouldn't say there's as much prestige in banking type careers after the global financial crisis).
    There is so much fail in your post, particularly the part that's in bold.
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    (Original post by d123)
    I'm one of those who would certainly turn down a job in IB in the unlikely event that I was offered one. I don't see the appeal. I want a job that helps people. IB is just about money - there may be more to it than that, but I can't see any value in the job and as money doesn't motivate me I'd far rather have a lower paid job where I'm actually making a difference than being in IB or something similar where I'm selling my soul and working long hours.

    Perhaps I'm just overly idealistic. As I say, there may be more to IB than my perception of it, and I'd be interested to see if anyone is in for reasons other than the perceived prestige or the money (although nowadays I wouldn't say there's as much prestige in banking type careers after the global financial crisis).
    I don't work in ib, but I do something vaguely similar. My motivation:

    1. Challenging, interesting work. I get paid to read about things I find interesting and would have read about in my spare time anyway. Someone is paying me to satisfy my curiosity. Time flies.

    2. Working with incredibly bright people. I see some of the guys I work for as celebrities. Everyone I work with is intelligent. Not true on the sell-side

    3. Enough money to live comfortably.

    It's good that you want to help people, the world would be a better place if more people had that attitude. My mum's a nurse even though she probably doesn't need to work.

    I'm too selfish to become a teacher.
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    (Original post by i_hate_teeth)
    There is so much fail in you're post, particularly the part that's in bold.
    Ignoring the obvious fail in your post, maybe you'd care to explain to me exactly what value there is in IB then? I'm not necessarily completely denying that there's value to it that I can't see, just saying that I can't see any, so if you explain to me what value you see in it then I might be prepared to accept that I'm wrong.
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    (Original post by The IC Guy)
    I don't work in ib, but I do something vaguely similar. My motivation:

    1. Challenging, interesting work. I get paid to read about things I find interesting and would have read about in my spare time anyway. Someone is paying me to satisfy my curiosity. Time flies.

    2. Working with incredibly bright people. I see some of the guys I work for as celebrities. Everyone I work with is intelligent. Not true on the sell-side

    3. Enough money to live comfortably.

    It's good that you want to help people, the world would be a better place if more people had that attitude. My mum's a nurse even though she probably doesn't need to work.

    I'm too selfish to become a teacher.
    Thanks for your answer - I appreciate that you explained your motivation, and I can see that those things are good and I can understand why that would be something worth doing, particularly if you find it interesting; what I've sometimes struggled to understand is why you'd give up a large amount of time doing something purely because of the monetary reward, but if you enjoy it and find it interesting that's good. I still wouldn't work in IB or a related field myself, just because I have different aims, but I understand your motivations.
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    (Original post by d123)
    what I've sometimes struggled to understand is why you'd give up a large amount of time doing something purely because of the monetary reward
    I wouldn't hold that against someone. The majority of people work purely for payday, you're lucky you can derive some other value from your job; maybe that's why you find it hard to understand? How many people do you think actually enjoy their career? Probably not many, so you may as well earn a fortune whilst you're at it... and the hours aren't as crazy as you'd imagine for very long. Most people who go into investment banking know what their 'exit option' is before they start, very few spend their whole career in M&A.
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    (Original post by d123)
    Ignoring the obvious fail in your post, maybe you'd care to explain to me exactly what value there is in IB then? I'm not necessarily completely denying that there's value to it that I can't see, just saying that I can't see any, so if you explain to me what value you see in it then I might be prepared to accept that I'm wrong.
    Awww i made a typo on tsr, who cares?

    Regarding the rest of your post. Why would I waste my time explaining to you what value there is in IB when you could easily run a google search and find out for yourself?

    ^that's a rhetorical question btw.
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    (Original post by i_hate_teeth)
    Awww i made a typo on tsr, who cares?

    Regarding the rest of your post. Why would I waste my time explaining to you what value there is in IB when you could easily run a google search and find out for yourself?

    ^that's a rhetorical question btw.
    I'd just rather hear it from someone who is in the field, or planning to go into the field, rather than a careers website.
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    My dad was an investment banker, he thought that seeing as he had to ork, may as well be something that he would get a lot of money from. He used to get paid, take his clients to The Ivy for lunch everyday and go to wine bars with his friends after work. But he missed the first 10 years of my childhood- the firt memory I have of my Dad is me aged about 6, my first of my mum is aged 2. My mum didn't work because she didn't have to with his salary. But when were old enough, she joined the police because she had wanted to ever since she was young. My dad saw how much she enjoyed her job, and left IB to join the police too. In fairness we had to move house,get a morgage and take a lot of care when we go food shopping, but they're so much happier. Money can't buy you that. If it does, than you just don't know what happyness is.
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    (Original post by d123)
    I'd just rather hear it from someone who is in the field, or planning to go into the field, rather than a careers website.
    Use your head, the people that write for these 'careers' websites as you say, are in the business.
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    (Original post by LauriC)
    My dad was an investment banker, he thought that seeing as he had to ork, may as well be something that he would get a lot of money from. He used to get paid, take his clients to The Ivy for lunch everyday and go to wine bars with his friends after work. But he missed the first 10 years of my childhood- the firt memory I have of my Dad is me aged about 6, my first of my mum is aged 2. My mum didn't work because she didn't have to with his salary. But when were old enough, she joined the police because she had wanted to ever since she was young. My dad saw how much she enjoyed her job, and left IB to join the police too. In fairness we had to move house,get a morgage and take a lot of care when we go food shopping, but they're so much happier. Money can't buy you that. If it does, than you just don't know what happyness is.
    cool story.
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    (Original post by i_hate_teeth)
    cool story.
    you're doing it wrong.

    This is how you do it.
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    (Original post by The IC Guy)
    Chuckling to myself about the guy who thinks the majority of teachers/engineers wouldn't take a job in ib if offered. Wave a £250k salary at someone who has been teaching for £20k for three years and see how many turn it down. I'd be willing to bet my life that >90% of recent graduates would accept the offer.

    Of course work/life balance is a consideration. I turned down offers in ib because of the hours, and one in trading (a market maker) because I didn't want the stress/career risk. But only because I knew I could earn similar money elsewhere.

    Those who can't, teach.
    But that's my point...

    You don't get £250k starting salary in IB and you aren't guaranteed to earn £250k. You start on £45/50k and for the work you do for that amount a lot of people would rather do something else.

    You can earn good money in any field, head teachers earn pretty good money, they can earn 100k, perhaps the teachers you're talking about aspire to that and wouldn't be turned by a quick buck. £250k a year isn't life changing money, it's not like you'd work for a year and then quit and be sorted...

    I know someone who was offered a job with standard chartered on £45k a year as a grad and also an accounting job for £23k. He took the accounting job as he felt in the long term it was more sensible as he'd get an ACA and a more stable career. His mate's who took the £45k jobs are all unemployed now and looking for jobs, he's not...

    You yourself clearly fit into the category of not taking a job in IB so quite why you find it so funny that I think everyone who doesn't work in IB would take an IB job at the drop of a hat I don't know?
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    (Original post by LauriC)
    My dad was an investment banker, he thought that seeing as he had to ork, may as well be something that he would get a lot of money from. He used to get paid, take his clients to The Ivy for lunch everyday and go to wine bars with his friends after work. But he missed the first 10 years of my childhood- the firt memory I have of my Dad is me aged about 6, my first of my mum is aged 2. My mum didn't work because she didn't have to with his salary. But when were old enough, she joined the police because she had wanted to ever since she was young. My dad saw how much she enjoyed her job, and left IB to join the police too. In fairness we had to move house,get a morgage and take a lot of care when we go food shopping, but they're so much happier. Money can't buy you that. If it does, than you just don't know what happyness is.
    *hands in notice and joins police force*
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    Sure i want to earn money, i have exspensive passions and wish to lead a certain standard of life. Thats only half the story though, I have a genuine passion for business and financial markets, I belive in captilasm and am fascinated by business. I feel that in trading (which is where in a IB i want to work) I would be able to experience this, I want to live live the markets every day. I want a job that engages me and prevents me from beeing distracted. I want a job where I can make a difference and am noticed for what I do, where I can work in a team and engage with people every day. Thats why I want to be a trader and im slightly dissapointed why a few other people havent got better reasons than money, respect and "a job that challenges them".
 
 
 
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