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The Republic of Ireland shoud re-join the Union Watch

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    Here's a thought, how about no?
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      (Original post by D.R.E)
      Or maybe I'm just speaking for myself here.
      I think you probably are.
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      Given the state of Ireland's finances (asking for a bailout) I would not want them to join, because we'd have to invest billions in Ireland just so we can get something back ourselves. And in this age of austerity, it is exactly the sort of route we should avoid.
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      Who agrees that a world with nations is for the worst?
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      (Original post by yawn)
      I think you probably are.
      You wouldn't know, being both non-British and an Irish republican.
      • Political Ambassador
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      Ireland could be seen as the UK's ex. Except this ex was beaten and staved by her husband. Ain't never going to happen way to much history there
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      Stupid idea! The Irish fought long and bitterly for their independence; even its current economic problems would not make Ireland contemplate losing their political sovereignty.
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      Nonononono do not want their debt!
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      (Original post by L i b)
      Don't really see any good reasons why not, but these sort of things are decided on anything but logic. Realistically, it's unlikely because the Irish are quite wedded to the repugnant ideology of nationalism.



      Unlike Ireland, those places were never part of Britain proper. They're socially quite different to the UK.
      Ireland was never in a realistic sense, a part of Britain and its severance from the Union was an inevitability. Britain's colonisation was marred by frequent and bloody rebellion, and an irreconcilable gulf between the Anglo-Irish rulers and the Catholic peasantry. Furthermore, the ideology of nationalism is not 'repugnant' - it was simply a manifestation of the Irish people's desire for improvement in their social and political situation where they remained deeply oppressed. Likewise in Italy in the 19th century for example.
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      I think it would be quite nice for Ireland to rejoin the fold, however I doubt that the Rep of Ireland will agree with my view and hence it will not happen.
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      (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
      Ireland was never in a realistic sense, a part of Britain and its severance from the Union was an inevitability. Britain's colonisation was marred by frequent and bloody rebellion, and an irreconcilable gulf between the Anglo-Irish rulers and the Catholic peasantry. Furthermore, the ideology of nationalism is not 'repugnant' - it was simply a manifestation of the Irish people's desire for improvement in their social and political situation where they remained deeply oppressed. Likewise in Italy in the 19th century for example.
      I agree with you and why you say nationalism in Irelands case was not repugnant (the concept at least). The radical republicans like Michael Collins/de Valera were less savoury charachters however.

      I think more could have been doene by the British to make Ireland feel more like part of the Union. Robert Kee agrees with me, Victoria and other monarchs could have visited more, Catholics could have been given more senior positions and earlier, rebellions put down less heavy handedly especially 1916 - a time where most of the population was happy to accept Home Rule.

      Do you think the existence of Catholicism as the dominant religion made separation inevitable?
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      (Original post by TheRevolution)
      Who agrees that Ireland should become part of the kingdon again?

      Who also agree that we should have forced them to do it and withholded bailout money (obv the EU prevent us from doing this in reality so hypotheticallY)?

      Is it likely that Irlenad coming back would be good for Btitain economically and politically?
      As someone of Irish Catholic descent I would whole-heartedly welcome Eire becoming part of the Union again. Obviously the idea of coercion is a non-starter,as it was coercion that led to the desire for independence anyway. I can't really see Eire as a seperate country when probably more people of Irish descent live in the uk than in Eire itself. I happen to believe in the union of the Irish,English,Scottish,and Welsh peoples ,and believe that we are stronger together than apart.
      Eire's affinity for the EU for many years shows that sovereignty was never the central issue in wanting independence from the uk.As someone said when Eire signed the new EU constitution ' We spent 400 years fighting for independence ,only to give it away in a second.
      No the main reason why eire would naturally want independence from the uk was simply because they were not treated with equanimity within it. So we would need a new type of constitution that would give equanimity between all four countries.
      Lets not forget that some of the driving force behind eire's desire for seperation was due to the Catholic church's loathing of protestant england.This can't hold as much sway now because the church is relatively discredited in eire now ,and people are generally more secular anyway.Moreover under Labour here there were some historic constitutional changes which allow Catholics more equanimity at the heart of the establishment .
      The ideas of oppression are complicated by the fact that the protestant community within eire were always under the cosh. I believe that at the time of partition eire was 30 per cent protestant ,but within a generation that had fallen to 9 per cent. Lets not forget that the playing of garrison games eg soccer,rugby,cricket, were looked down upon in eire,and only just allowed recently at the national stadium.Lets not forget that many people who were regarded as 'different' in eire eg gays etc,had to come to london to find refuge.Lets not forget that scotland was once a colony of ireland.
      I believe that the history of the irish people's is so entwined with the rest of the british people that i can't see us as seperate peoples where i definitely see the french and german as seperate.
      People may criticize partition ,but in countries like sri lanka ,the tamils curse the british for not creating partition at the time of independence.
      I think that recent economic events have shown that it is difficult for small countries to survive alone.
      I believe in the british and irish people's being as one,but i also rue the loosening of ties between ourselves and australia,new zealand,and canada.Somewhere along the line the british people lost their self-belief.The idea that people who shed their blood for the freeedom of europe now have to queue up as aliens when they come here,whereas romanians etc have freedom of access,is one of the great tragedies in history.
      So come on eire ,come back to the uk. Its that or having jerry adams as your next prime minister.
      In pure economic terms we are already close to eire because it is virtually our biggest trading partner.We export more to eire than we do to germany.
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      (Original post by L i b)
      I don't make a habit of butting in to reply to discussions between other people, but I felt it worth mentioning that you may be approaching something that I (and, I suspect, quite a lot of mainland British people) loathe: an Ulster/NI/Protestant (basically 'our community') small-n nationalist in the DUP vein. "Our affairs"? I remind you that, as part of this country, Northern Ireland is our affair - just like England, or indeed my native Scotland.
      I'm actually of the Alliance Party persuasion.
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      No, only for the reason that I like going shopping without being exploded.
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      It's simply not going to happen.

      Take one look at the history between the countries and it would be crying shame for Ireland to give up it's independance after such a hard fought struggle. The country had a strong economy pre-2008 and still has a Low corporation tax and ECB rates that will remain attractive to businesses once we can stand on our own two feet again.
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        (Original post by L i b)
        You wouldn't know, being both non-British and an Irish republican.
        Having a go again, L i b? And yet you said to someone else that you don't make a habit of butting into other people's conversations - your post #19. How do!

        I think it's important to remember that, despite your protestations, you have sympathies that lie with the very worst of unionism...an arrogance and disdain for people who would like Ireland to be re-united, both North and Republic.

        Oh, yes...I have dual nationality...do you? And as such, I know how both feel.
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        (Original post by jbeacom600)
        I may be mistake, but you sound like the kind of Englishman that Irish people, north and south, protestant and catholic loathe. The kind that meddle in our affairs basically. This might sound a bit harsh and over-reactive, but it becomes very sickening. I remember reading an article in the Independent not too long ago saying that England should "sell Ulster to ROI" and "earn a peace bonus." How very deluded. It will not ever happen.
        In other words: we must continue to flood your provnce with countless economic aid and military protection. But don't we dare for a moment think we should have a say in what goes on. After all, it's not like you've ever asked for our help or failed to get things done by yourselves, is it?
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        (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
        Stupid idea! The Irish fought long and bitterly for their independence; even its current economic problems would not make Ireland contemplate losing their political sovereignty.
        *cough* European Union *cough*
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        This is either the dumbest post ever to wander into political thought, or a really good troll.
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        A United Ireland is much more likely than the republic joining the UK, and even that is hella unlikely.
       
       
       
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