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What do you actually DO when your travel alone? Watch

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    I find it more flexible when i travel alone, but i would like to have someone with me so i can have someone to laugh with and talk to whilst waiting for the flight.
    When i traveled alone, i go to the hotel, go out and then go to some coffee shop/restaurant or anywhere where there are lots of people. That way, i can meet people and at least be friends with them.
    Im always excited to meet the people and to see the places when i go travel. Tbh if traveling is cheap, that would be my hobby and i would fly all the time just to satisfy myself and see the world.
    All in all, i prefer to travel with someone. Traveling alone makes me sad and if i wanted to take a picture of myself in like a tourist spot i can't do it unless i have someone random person to take a picture of me which is awkward because they might run away with my camera.
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    Just do what you want. See the sights, have some fun. Surely there's a reason behind where you choose to travel. With a bit of planning, you'll have lots to do.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Wow, that sounds amazing. When did you go?
    May - September last year
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      (Original post by goewyn)
      May - September last year
      After sixth form? Pre-university?

      Do you intend to do it again sometime in the future?

      How much was it? :p:
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      (Original post by im so academic)
      After sixth form? Pre-university?

      Do you intend to do it again sometime in the future?

      How much was it? :p:
      Nah, I'm old - I was 22 last year and had just finished my BA

      It cost me about ten grand australian. At the time, that worked out a bit over 5,000 pounds.

      Definitely going to do it again. In a month I'm going to Nepal to wander around some villages on my own and then meet up with a friend for a trek. But then no more until I've finished my Masters and have been working a while and have more money.
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      I would so love to travel but not alone, never alone it would make the entire journey really lonely and horrible cause there's no-one you can speak to and have fun with. Ideally me and a few of my best mates travelling around the world would be so awesome!
      I'm on my gap year aswell which means I can travel to places but all I need now is a few more friends lol who aren't busy with life. Damn I so wish I could go on HOLIDAY!
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      (Original post by Casshern1456)
      I would so love to travel but not alone, never alone it would make the entire journey really lonely and horrible cause there's no-one you can speak to and have fun with. Ideally me and a few of my best mates travelling around the world would be so awesome!
      I'm on my gap year aswell which means I can travel to places but all I need now is a few more friends lol who aren't busy with life. Damn I so wish I could go on HOLIDAY!
      You must be a very sad and unsociable person then. If your not able to talk to people and have fun with anyone beside your best mates then its a pretty sad reflection on you. I would say that about 30% of the people ive met are travelling alone, and they are often a lot happier than those travelling with friends. Im travelling by myself and love it - there is a great sense of freedom to do what you want and when. Stay in hostels and your surrounded by friends anyway.

      If you want my advice buy a flight ticket somewhere you want to go - book a hostel and enjoy your time on a gap year. Friends come and go, the ones who are worth it will be there when you get back.
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      (Original post by Riderz)
      You must be a very sad and unsociable person then. If your not able to talk to people and have fun with anyone beside your best mates then its a pretty sad reflection on you. I would say that about 30% of the people ive met are travelling alone, and they are often a lot happier than those travelling with friends. Im travelling by myself and love it - there is a great sense of freedom to do what you want and when. Stay in hostels and your surrounded by friends anyway.

      If you want my advice buy a flight ticket somewhere you want to go - book a hostel and enjoy your time on a gap year. Friends come and go, the ones who are worth it will be there when you get back.
      No I'm a very sociable person but as I'm on a gap year it means all of my friends are either at uni or work. I just want to travel and have some friends around to share the experience with, I may just travel with a bunch of strangers I meet off the internet one day. Thanks for the advice anyway.
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      (Original post by Malkmus)
      First things first, travelling alone doesn't mean doing everything by yourself. You will meet people, I have no reason to doubt that unless you're travelling in an environment whether other people simply rarely travel. Even when I was in the north of Sweden and everybody in the hostel I stayed in was about 20 years older than me and there simply to hike, I still managed to bump into a couple of people on the street who invited me to a house party. Obviously, you need to put yourself out there but I think you'll be surprised how open and forward some other people are... that they'll approach you.

      Most of the time I was away I just did all the things I wanted to - kayaked, went to lots of museums and galleries, ate interesting food etc. etc. Often in the daytime I was by myself but that was more intentional... I turned down invites from other people because I wanted to do the things I wanted to do rather than just go along with something else. Even on days I didn't do that much, I was easily entertained wandering around soaking up the atmosphere of wherever I was, people watching, drinking coffee, smoking etc. Time seemed to fly. Evening was when I turned into more of a social butterfly, hung out with people just chatting, playing games and went out clubbing etc.

      If you're going to travel alone then you need to be comfortable in your own company (obviously) but you're probably not going to be alone anywhere near as much as you imagine and it's surprising how you react in a situation where you feel as though you haven't spoken to anybody for ages. You'll probably get used to striking up conversation with random people and some of the most fantastic people I met on my trip were people I just randomly spoke to on train journeys, in coffee shops and when smoking. Definitely felt like I had more of an experience going solo than I would if I'd have travelled with a friend. One of my friends met me for 2 weeks, and whilst I enjoyed his company, my favourite parts of the trip were where I was "alone". Met so many more people, had so many more unforgettable experiences.
      This sounds amazing. As I was reading I could totally picture myself doing it and I kinda got all excited about the future lol. I'm pretty comfortable being on my own/striking up conversation so I think I would be fine. Where/when did you go? I'm looking to save some money between now and the end of my degree...
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      I like this thread.

      I would actually love to travel alone but I chicken out because I worry about being a comparatively vulnerable young female who doesn't speak the language, and visiting countries where they may be less than tolerant of my race. Every time I work the nerve to do it, I get a tonne of scare stories. But I think I may do it anyway... one day...
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      (Original post by Dijobla)
      I like this thread.

      I would actually love to travel alone but I chicken out because I worry about being a comparatively vulnerable young female who doesn't speak the language, and visiting countries where they may be less than tolerant of my race. Every time I work the nerve to do it, I get a tonne of scare stories. But I think I may do it anyway... one day...
      There's a tonne of fabulous stories as well

      I'd never had to face any racial issues, but as for being a comparatively vulnerable young who knows no language other than english, I was always fine.
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      (Original post by Dijobla)
      I like this thread.

      I would actually love to travel alone but I chicken out because I worry about being a comparatively vulnerable young female who doesn't speak the language, and visiting countries where they may be less than tolerant of my race. Every time I work the nerve to do it, I get a tonne of scare stories. But I think I may do it anyway... one day...
      Why not put some effort in and learn a language? If the main thing holding you back is being scared of being in a foreign country and not speaking the language, that's a pretty easy thing to resolve, with a bit of effort! Depending on where you want to travel, there's usually one main language which will get you by alongside English, and you'd be fine. For example, if you want to travel around Europe, having French and English would mean it would be very rare for you to come across a scenario where you couldn't make yourself understood if necessary. Most countries have a good enough command of English that you can find someone who speaks it well enough to help in an emergency. Even if you won't be able to chat to locals, you would be able to find help if you needed it.

      Most countries in Europe aren't particularly racist. Or at least, they wouldn't be racist to your face, which sucks, but at least it means you won't really understand them. To be honest, even in countries which are intolerant of Arabs/Eastern Europeans/black people who come to LIVE in their country, most are perfectly respectful of foreign tourists. Italy and France are both pretty intolerant of black people and middle eastern looking people, but that's generally because they have stereotypes of poor people looking to live in the country permanently and either commit crime or undermine the 'European' way of life. If you're clearly a tourist from a rich country, they won't pay you any attention.
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      And generally if you have a phrasebook with you or even a Lonely Planet guide which have basic phrasebooks inside, you can pick up enough of a language for general getting around purposes within a few days. Not enough to carry a conversation, obviously, but enough for polite greetings, getting to the train station, buying a map, finding the bathroom.
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      Hmm...I personally find phrasebooks pretty useless for anything other than being able to greet people in a shop. It makes a lot more sense to either learn the language enough to converse without the book even if it's in a stilted manner, or simply learn the local phrase for "Do you speak English?". I find phrasebooks are worse than nothing, simply because you'll get a lot more help by finding an English speaker, than asking in the local language and not understanding the response.

      I'm not saying this to scare anyone, but simply to prevent people wasting their money on books! It's all very well being able to ask questions in the local language, but the problem with phrasebooks comes when someone gives you an answer that you don't expect (which is massively likely, if all the phrasebook tells you are 'left' and 'right' and maybe a few landmarks).
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      (Original post by Lizia)
      Hmm...I personally find phrasebooks pretty useless for anything other than being able to greet people in a shop. It makes a lot more sense to either learn the language enough to converse without the book even if it's in a stilted manner, or simply learn the local phrase for "Do you speak English?". I find phrasebooks are worse than nothing, simply because you'll get a lot more help by finding an English speaker, than asking in the local language and not understanding the response.

      I'm not saying this to scare anyone, but simply to prevent people wasting their money on books! It's all very well being able to ask questions in the local language, but the problem with phrasebooks comes when someone gives you an answer that you don't expect (which is massively likely, if all the phrasebook tells you are 'left' and 'right' and maybe a few landmarks).
      It really depends on the way that you're travelling - if like I did last year you are wandering around through countries and continents it's quite handy to be able to show locals you're at least making an effort without neccessarily needing to learn 4 or 5 languages on the fly. I don't mean having the book in your hands while conducting conversation. I tried to memorise and practise Greek phrases while ferry-hopping around the islands, for example. And even though almost everyone spoke very good English, when I wandered around tiny villages on the not so touristy islands, it sure made a difference when I could order my coffee in Greek and the locals were delighted and even more welcoming because of it.
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      (Original post by Ricky116)
      This sounds amazing. As I was reading I could totally picture myself doing it and I kinda got all excited about the future lol. I'm pretty comfortable being on my own/striking up conversation so I think I would be fine. Where/when did you go? I'm looking to save some money between now and the end of my degree...
      I went 2 days after graduation, in the middle of July for over 2 months to Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Germany and Holland. But I spent quite a while longer in Sweden and Norway than in any of the other countries. I think I went to about 10 different cities/towns whilst I was in Sweden for example. But yeah, if you can save money up and go when I did... straight after finishing uni then that'd be awesome. I honestly think it's an ideal time to go. I was bricking about going by myself but I probably wouldn't wanna travel any other way now. Loved it so much that I'm now just working a **** job for a year to kill time and save money for going to live and work in Asia.
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      (Original post by Awesome-o)
      1) Check into a good hostel, not too big, well reviewed for the social aspects
      2) Meet people in the common rooms
      3) Go out every night with new people
      This is what most people seem to do. Think of the classic Western backpackers around asia. They basically go for cheap beer and sun, and to wear different kinds of flip flops.

      I'll give you some examples of what I did, alone, OP, from a 1-month trip around China when I was 19. Bear in mind that I am a very solitary person, indeed I couldn't make friends even if I wanted to.

      I basically just booked a flight to Beijing, and one home from Hong Kong, and that was it. No accommodation planned.
      When I arrived I spent about six hours walking around the city thinking of somewhere to stay. I looked in a couple of very white hostels, full of trendy white folk getting drunk and ****ing each other, but eventually found a very quaint little place where I was the only westerner. In all I spent a week in Beijing, longer than I expected because it was a struggle to book tickets out of the damn place - simple stuff like that can take a long time in places like that. You can sometimes have to budget a whole day for the acquisition of some simple part of the plan for your next step.

      I'm actually getting bored of writing now but essentially time falls away really quickly. Everything takes a long time. I went to see certain sights... ok, cool, interesting, but then just chill out. I just sat around enjoying the place. I went hiking some days in the mountains, just exploring and ****. Sit and look at the view. Acquire food and eat it. Talking to locals is good as well, they love it, and in some parts you're the first whitey they've seen for a longggg time.
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      Hmmmm. Good question, but whatever it is, i've been doing it for the last 2.5 years solid :-)

      Apart from my final travel buddy of 3 months, the longest i'd ever travelled with anyone was 5 weeks - and i didn't know any of them before my trip. You are rarely alone even when you are. Just go, it'll work itself out. Talk to people, anyone and everyone. The worse they can do is not talk back!!! (thats one of the things i hate when i'm occasionally back here for a few weeks - most people are feckin unfriendly!).
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      (Original post by Casshern1456)
      No I'm a very sociable person but as I'm on a gap year it means all of my friends are either at uni or work. I just want to travel and have some friends around to share the experience with, I may just travel with a bunch of strangers I meet off the internet one day. Thanks for the advice anyway.
      Do what you want to do, dont worry about other people. You can spend your whole life waiting for what appears to be the right time, whereas in fact if you got on and did it then you'll find the right time is whenever you actually just do it.
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      (Original post by Riderz)
      You must be a very sad and unsociable person then. If your not able to talk to people and have fun with anyone beside your best mates then its a pretty sad reflection on you. I would say that about 30% of the people ive met are travelling alone, and they are often a lot happier than those travelling with friends. Im travelling by myself and love it - there is a great sense of freedom to do what you want and when. Stay in hostels and your surrounded by friends anyway.

      .
      It's worth noting that people differ in terms of their levels of ex/introversion. For an extrovert, the need to be around people would make the idea of solo travelling quite off-putting, understandably. And lets face it, there will be many periods of loneliness, despite some great sociable hostels and stuff.
     
     
     
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