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    (Original post by Arekkusu)
    I don't wish to belittle you, but it's probably because you stopped being a teenager. Yeah, that abruptly. It's strange how things like that seem they should be slow and insidious but actually they're not: I bet you can think of discrete epiphanies in, say, your sexual development, where you realised, wow, this all actually looks quite fun, let's shed the shackles. Weird, huh?

    Obviously you need to put the work in like you said with your revision plan. That is actually a bit of an inspiration for me so thanks.

    I think it's a bit of a precarious topic to attribute depression to adolescence. Especially considering that prevalence of depression amongst 15-18 year-olds are the same as adult levels, and its' onset is explained by psychosocial factors rather than hormonal fluctuation, and it would raise major ethical questions regarding the clinical professionals who prescribe antidepressants to thousands of teenagers nationwide.
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    (Original post by Boobies.)
    Yes I am, And yes I am. My local NHS child counselling service only provides for people aged 16 and under, and the adult programme caters for people 18 and above.
    I doubt they just forget about people in the middle...no CAMHS?
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    (Original post by rawwwwr!)
    I doubt they just forget about people in the middle...no CAMHS?
    Nope. Went to my new doctor months ago (after the last one spent a year dismissing it as 'women's problems' and she said the only local service for teenagers has an upper age limit of 16. I'm on the waiting list for the adult one, as i turn 18 in April.

    We need a better health care system
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    For me, it's not been that bad. To get the real picture, you'd have to ask Fred.

    Fred, come on out...
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    haha lol...
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    I've been affected by pretty much every mental health issue you can imagine. I've really always been borderline autistic and it exhibits itself most annoyingly in my love of collecting and categorising the most random things you can imagine, and getting very obsessive about them. It also makes me feel very emotionally detached from people and all of my relationships have been with the most messed up people imaginable probably partially because normal people cannot tolerate my inability to exhibit normal emotion, and the fact I can be very rude without realising it (which has landed me in a lot of hot water with teachers).

    Then from about 13-15 I was plagued by a variety of eating disorders. I was eating so little that it eventually led to calcification of my pancreas (which is surprisingly painful) and that was a wake up call I needed to adopt a healthier approach to my diet. And even though I'm very slim to this day (and struggle to find trousers that fit me), I do eat more sensibly now.

    Around 15-16, I developed (what I later found out was) trichtillomania, a compulsive urge to pull my hair (though for me it was localised around my eyebrows and a few other parts). Obviously there are no actual physical harmful effects of this, but what was left of my eyebrows was so sparse that I had to draw them on using eyebrow pencil. After a year or so, I learned to cope better with my trich but I still maintain thin eyebrows for a guy (I learned to control my impulses and just use tweezers rather than pulling clumps out). No one really bothered me about it, but it did make social situations even more awkward as I had the sensation that everyone was staring at me.

    At 17 I started having spells of mild depression which would come and go, and although I put on a happy face in front of others I would completely lose the will to do anything and want to spend the whole day just in bed. I never let it spiral out of control but it's something I still battle with periodically.

    Wow, I've never really written all of this in one go. I'm so messed up.
    • #7
    #7

    not motivated enough to even get out of bed
    sleep about 14 hours a day
    and even when i am awake its like im sleeping, moping around my house between things but not actually doing anything
    its got the the point where even emptying the dishwasher, getting dressed, brushing teeth, are a massive effort
    when im late for school every day i know i will get into trouble i just dont care
    when i get bad reports, i think "yeah i should do some work", but it never happens or happens excruciatingly slowly, for example, making a 20 minute homework last 3 hours which turns into not doing it at all
    in person im friendly and chatty
    whenever im out with my friends, even if im having an alright time, i just cant wait to be back home by myself
    people dont really interest me unless i want something from them
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    I think it's a bit of a precarious topic to attribute depression to adolescence. Especially considering that prevalence of depression amongst 15-18 year-olds are the same as adult levels, and its' onset is explained by psychosocial factors rather than hormonal fluctuation, and it would raise major ethical questions regarding the clinical professionals who prescribe antidepressants to thousands of teenagers nationwide.
    I don't necessarily mean hormonal depression in teenagers. Simply the transition to adult life - getting a job, becoming self-sufficient, learning inconvenient truths - can serve as a good shake-up for some/most people. Since going to university I haven't exactly shrugged off my depression but the landscape of my mind has changed as detailed in my post before the one you quoted. I would be ready to bet that it would be an optimum time for mental disorders to lift, change or descend.

    This is why we have the popular distinction between "moody teenagers" and "quarter-life crisis".

    (I would still maintain that the settling of hormones as well as the social stuff acts to further optimise this stage of life for changes.)

    But yeah the important part of my post was the other bit really :p:
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    (Original post by screenager2004)
    I had depression for five years, it wasn't major, psychotic depression but it was enough to make living not really worth it. I withdrew from my friendship groups, wouldn't leave the house for weeks at a time, ended up getting into fights and put into an isolation unit (which was essentially a cupboard without windows with a desk in it, where I'd sit from 9am until 3pm to do schoolwork alone) broke down into tears a lot during lessons and at work, got sent home, got referred to specialist educational centres for maladjusted children, my attendance dropped by half, scraped through A levels with few good memories, parents tried to persuade me into counselling which I finally went to at university but then ended up dropping out due to hopelessness about future.

    blah blah

    Anyway, one night I was laying in my bed thinking about how dull the prospect of spending the next 60 years of my life in this state of pointlessness because I'd never have the guts to commit suicide. (I'm sure many of you will know the feeling)
    I woke up the next morning and it was just gone. It's like.... have you ever had a moment of epiphany where you suddenly realise you're completely over an ex? I literally woke up and that emptiness had just evaporated and I smiled and felt relaxed and contented in my nice warm bed with the sun spilling in through the window.

    And so I've been feeling really great for the last five or six months.

    Last week I got a terrible result in a mock exam (it wasn't even a passing grade). I cried when I got home for a good hour, then set out with a new revision plan straight away, put my all into it and saw myself improving immediately. Two days later and I had completely gotten over it, just felt like "Yeah it was a shock, but I'm doing this extra work and it'll pay off and I'm not scared about taking the test" That would have never been the case last year. I'm genuinely astounded how well I coped with it, if that had happened a year ago, it would have totally sapped all my motivation away.

    They say we only use 10% of our conscious brainpower, so I believe the human mind does have the potential to pull itself out of depression, just it's a latent ability that we're unable to tap into intentionally. But the possibility is there, if anyone is feeling like they're in for a miserable 80 years on this planet and there's no happiness in the world, I urge you to carry on with the best of your ability and one day you might just wake up feeling like a complete human being again. It could happen to you next week.
    I must say it's really quite inspiring to hear this, particularly the notion that it literally seemed to disappear overnight. While I really think it's very important for people who don't feel they've overcome their ailment to be able to open up and discuss it with a group of similar-minded people (my first time on a student forum and I'm finding it quite odd how much more similar the approaches of thinking about these things are to my own than other depression/anxiety/ocd-related forums), I imagine it benefits everyone here to hear from someone who feels they've defeated their demon.

    I've often found to my dismay that on the internet there seems to be far much more information about people who have not yet overcome their illness than those who have, of whom there seem to be seldom any accounts at all. On many occasions I've wondered why this is - often resulting in the perhaps-somewhat-paranoid worry that there in fact isn't any hope for happiness in one's life once they've developed depression. I imagine the truth behind the matter relates more to the fact that everybody has their own problems and many of those who in fact have overcome large episodes of mental illness are instead worrying about relationships or grades or money or the future.

    I can't say I've had it nearly as hard as some of the accounts I've seen on here but to me it's still felt like absolute hell. For the past one and a half years now I don't think there's been a day in which I haven't thought about it. At the same time I can see my time at university passing me by and feeling as though I'm mising out on something which could have been an amazing period within my life (currently in my 3rd year, and had a wonderful 1st year, immediately after which the illness struck, so in a way it feels worse having experienced some of it). I'm finding it much harder to do the work and more often than not finding myself pulling near-allnighters to get done what should have taken a couple of hours at the most. I'm afraid to try entering a relationship due to lack of motivation to begin with and the fear that i just wouldn't find any joy in it and end up failing at it and breaking up with a girl who's ended up far more miserable than she initially was by my own depressive personality. Like a lot of people here seem to have testified to being, I'm also seen by my friends and associates as an incredibly happy person, the few whom I've dared to mention the idea of mental illness to having refused to believe me. My parents know, and other than one close friend in the year above who suffered from bipolar herself, that's pretty much it. I think the worst part is the fact that half the time i feel as though there's this other side to me completey devoid of all the depression, anxiety, obsessional thoughs and compulsive despelling actions that could just exist if only I knew how to revert to it. In fact pretty much all the compulsions I use are brought about by the idea that one of them will eventually allow me to 'snap out of it' and forever exit this torturous state of mind (it's only been very comparatively recently that Ive realised they're really NOT doing this and thus it's probably best to resist them no matter how great the persuasion from my mind is).

    That's my 'tale of woe' anyhow. I just think that as it's been useful to me reading other people's posts and noticing parallels between their own stories and mine, others may find the same thing. The point I was trying to get to was that I believe there is hope for all of us, and whether its destined to go away very gradually or indeed in an instant, all we can do until that time is keep trying to beat it and otherwise cope with life in its presence.
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    (Original post by Boobies.)
    Yes I am, And yes I am. My local NHS child counselling service only provides for people aged 16 and under, and the adult programme caters for people 18 and above.
    that's terrible. it's usually.. if you're still in full time education then you can be treated as a child. is there no way you can be referred to someone through your GP? seems silly that you just have to wait til you turn 18.
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    (Original post by Boobies.)
    Yes I am, And yes I am. My local NHS child counselling service only provides for people aged 16 and under, and the adult programme caters for people 18 and above.
    is that CAMHS? that's terrible. how can they just ignore everyone form 16-18? I still see them and i'm 19 (apparently, 'cause i'm still in education and whatnot, it means theyre more suited to the type of situations i would typically experience day to day, or something. I think it means they're calling me immature, though :rolleyes: )
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    My brother suffered a psychotic episode around this time last year and has since been suffering from psychosis which is such a terrible thing and is really destroying my family's life. The things he does and says are just unbelievable, I wouldn't wish this on anybody; but we can't get help because the psychiatrists he sees can't discard what he is saying as not the truth. So he's not getting the help he truly deserves, and we as a family cannot get any help. People come round and say to us to stick it out and be there for him, but how can you when he tries to kill my dad or calls my mum a disabled *****. It's heartbreaking and we just can't see a way out of it. I'm not sure about the provision available for people with depression, anxiety, bi polar etc... but for people suffering in the way my brother and family is, this country's mental health care is an absolute joke.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've suffered from pretty severe OCD for five years now; it crushed myself confidence and made me a pretty messed up individual.

    Only now am I kind of coming to terms with the fact that I really do need help (taken long enough)..and I'm so tired of having to pretend everything's okay- I daren't moan about it incase I annoy people.

    My parents still don't know but I hate to admit I can't help but feel ashamed and embarassed even though I know I shouldn't.

    Anyway, I'm interested in how people handle it whether it's yourself or someone you know.

    I think that there should be more of an emphasis on recognising mental illnesses because in my experience nobody really talks about them because they're kind of invisible if you get what I mean and my parents have often just labelled me as a 'hormonal' teenager :/
    I have OCD too - it can get pretty horrible at times. People think it's just hand washing and counting things lol, if only they knew the thought that torment us to make us do those things...

    I used to get pretty upset by it, and it affected me quite a lot when I was younger (14-ish). I'd have panic attacks all the time, refuse to leave the house, sit there worrying for hours etc. It didn't help that I also had clinical depression and Generalised Anxiety Disorder...ah the fun of it. I saw a therapist for it, and at first I thought it didn't help, so I tried several ones until I found one who did. And now, it hardly bothers me. The depression is gone (yay! I had that because of circumstances anyway) and the GAD is hardly there anymore, I haven't had a panic attack for over a year.

    As for the OCD - I've accepted it'll never be cured completely, but it's a lot less severe than it used to be. Everyone has problems to deal with, and I look at it as if this is just one of mine. I have 'waves' of it lol, if that makes sense. Sometimes it'll hardly bother me, and sometimes I'll have to wash my hands a little more often than normal. But it's got a lot better, and I'd really reccomend seeing someone about it.

    I refuse to go anon for this in a bid to make people less ignorant about mental illness. I used to be so guarded about it, but now I don't care so much. Obviously I don't declare it at every opportunity, but I don't hide it constantly either. My OCD is exactly the same as someone's broken leg, or diabetes, and it shouldn't be looked on as something shameful. I hope one day, society as a whole can view it like that.

    Good luck for getting help.
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    (Original post by Boobies.)
    Nope. Went to my new doctor months ago (after the last one spent a year dismissing it as 'women's problems' and she said the only local service for teenagers has an upper age limit of 16. I'm on the waiting list for the adult one, as i turn 18 in April.

    We need a better health care system
    I agree. I luckily got to continue with camhs till i was 18 but the adult service is shocking, I've been left for months with nothing all because of the waiting list.I mean, in that time, things could go seriously downhill for anyone.
    • #8
    #8

    Depression & Anorexia/Bulimia have been ruining my life..
    I've lost alot of friends. I despise going out as I just feel so fat & depressed all the time.
    Lately I can't stop crying, I'm at uni and the binging&purging is just stupid at the moment.
    I'm hating being at home as I have to pretend to be okay as this time last year I was a few pounds from hospital & I convinced my parents I'm recovered.
    I hate myself so much.

    It almost split me & my boyf up of 3 and a half years, his parents got involved, they hated me, I drank quite a lot at one point, sh'ed every night, od'ed a few times..

    But now I don't do those things, I guess I cope in a different way.
    I can't imagine getting over it now :/
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    I think my depression throughout sixth form made me mess up all my A Levels, so much so that I refused to go back to my school to retake as I felt I couldn't really do better at the time. Though, now I'm at college doing something completely different, and I actually feel quite better now. Sometimes just a change of scenery or direction can help a whole lot.

    (Original post by Boobies.)
    Yes I am, And yes I am. My local NHS child counselling service only provides for people aged 16 and under, and the adult programme caters for people 18 and above.
    Well, that is so stupid, and I really think you should complain to them about it. When I was 18, I was sent by my GP to a child counsellor, because I was still at school. Also, I'm surprised they're just throwing drugs at you like that, as my doctors always refused me every time I asked for them :hmmmm:. But yeah, if I were you, I'd do something about that discrimination against 17-year-olds, cos I think that's not right.

    ETA: OK, I see I'm not the only one who's quoted you on this. Sorry to be sounding like a bit of a broken record there :o:, but at least you know some people have got your back
    • #9
    #9

    In so many ways..judging by other posters in here, unfortunately some mental illnesses seem to trigger others, or at least make you more susceptible to them. I've had mild depression, that led to bulimia when I was 16-17. Now I've found out I have AvPD (avoidance personality disorder). I cry at the slightest criticism, spent all of secondary school crying in class if a teacher told me off for something really minor such as not doing the homework. I thought I was just an overly sensitive person but the fact that no-one else acted like this made me realise I'm not normal. I can't call people or answer phone calls. I'm looking for a job currently but that problem makes it hard because I get so nervous when calling people, I feel like I'm going to be sick. The only people I can bear to call are my parents. I don't have many friends because I fear rejection if I invite them to do something. All of this makes my depression worse. I've started missing crits (I go to art school and we have crits every thursday) because I am so terrified about the smallest of negative feedback about my work, and I'd be so embarrassed if I started crying in front of the whole class. I feel like such a weak person
    • #3
    #3

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    In so many ways..judging by other posters in here, unfortunately some mental illnesses seem to trigger others, or at least make you more susceptible to them. I've had mild depression, that led to bulimia when I was 16-17. Now I've found out I have AvPD (avoidance personality disorder). I cry at the slightest criticism, spent all of secondary school crying in class if a teacher told me off for something really minor such as not doing the homework. I thought I was just an overly sensitive person but the fact that no-one else acted like this made me realise I'm not normal. I can't call people or answer phone calls. I'm looking for a job currently but that problem makes it hard because I get so nervous when calling people, I feel like I'm going to be sick. The only people I can bear to call are my parents. I don't have many friends because I fear rejection if I invite them to do something. All of this makes my depression worse. I've started missing crits (I go to art school and we have crits every thursday) because I am so terrified about the smallest of negative feedback about my work, and I'd be so embarrassed if I started crying in front of the whole class. I feel like such a weak person
    I get that too, it makes me feel so pathetic how scared of people I am. If I go to the supermarket (a horrible experience) I can't even say excuse me to people who are standing blocking the thing I want so I have to wait around for ages trying to avoid being seen.

    With the phone calls have you tried writing out a script beforehand? That's about the only way I can force myself to make calls, I write out exactly what I'm going to say and what I expect them to reply (usually a whole load of different possible replies). Obviously this only works for relatively simple stuff, but hey, start small and try to build it up. Might be worth a shot if you haven't tried that before.
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    Mental illness can take over your life, definitely. It can make you turn into someone you never thought you would. It's one of the things I fear most about life, regaining the depression/anxiety that I have had on and off through my life. I don't believe that it is recognised enough today, a lot of people put it down to "hormones" in women... it's "just a little bit of stress/normal" and a lot of people fall through from help or don't get the help they deserve for their condition wasn't properly diagnosed. The correct help should always be offered, for mental illness can ruin your life. Last year when I suffered from the worst depression I think I ever had, I honestly thought I wasn't going to ever see the light again. But I went back to counselling and began receiving the right help for my problem. This way I came out the other end feeling a lot better. But I had previously been through a series of counselling and not felt that I was given the correct treatment for me... meaning I left feeling pretty much how I felt when I arrived.

    The amount of people suffering from depression and anxiety in the UK is a huge number, 1 in 3 is the ratio as far as I know and it causes a huge amount of people to ring in sick at work and have time off. Mental illness is just as important and worthy of help as is physical illness, and people should definitely be receiving the correct help immediately.

    If anyone on here is suffering from a mental illness and hasn't decided to get help yet, do it now. Ring your GP and make an appointment. Don't suffer in silence for you really shouldn't have too.
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    (Original post by Boobies.)
    Yes I am, And yes I am. My local NHS child counselling service only provides for people aged 16 and under, and the adult programme caters for people 18 and above.
    That can't be right... I have anxiety, got diagnosed when I was 17 and referred to counselling and from there to CBT not long after. They really didn't want to put me on medication.

    Do you have a long time to wait?
 
 
 
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