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    Man I didn't know such a thing happened. That's not right that top uni makes mistakes like this. But then again, they must be very busy!
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    (Original post by Omio)
    Is it advisable to ask colleges to confirm that the decisions applicants have received are correct?
    No, it isn't.
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    (Original post by Omio)
    Is it advisable to ask colleges to confirm that the decisions applicants have received are correct?
    Not unless you want to seem like a total nutter.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    Not unless you want to seem like a total nutter.
    Even then, there are many far more fun ways to give that impression in Oxford
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    (Original post by AnonymousPenguin)
    (Original post by Assassnum)
    I am pretty sure that if you have the letter there are more or less binding legal obligations for Oxford to give you the place ... I wouldnt be THAT sure about e-mails
    There's no such legal obligation.
    Are you sure about that? I would say that, if the letter states that you are holding an offer, subject to stated conditions, which is yours to accept or decline, and it is signed by a representative of the college who is authorized to do so, it is quite simply a legally binding contract.

    If, of course, the letter is worded in an indecisive way, or it is not signed, then it has about as much legal weight as a typical christmas card.
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    There was a guy on TSR a couple of years ago who got an acceptance letter from oxbridge (cant remember which) and it turned out to be a mistake
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    (Original post by freezombie)
    Are you sure about that? I would say that, if the letter states that you are holding an offer, subject to stated conditions, which is yours to accept or decline, and it is signed by a representative of the college who is authorized to do so, it is quite simply a legally binding contract.

    If, of course, the letter is worded in an indecisive way, or it is not signed, then it has about as much legal weight as a typical christmas card.

    that's why I thought it might be legally binding ... since my letter is signed by an Oxford official ..
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    (Original post by Omio)
    Is it advisable to ask colleges to confirm that the decisions applicants have received are correct?
    If you get rejected, ask. If you get an offer, get a screenshot of UCAS etc, so even if it were an error, they'll have to honour it. Swish
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    (Original post by Sternumator)
    I can't remember the guys name but he is on question time a bit. He got an acceptance letter off oxford when they meant to reject him but they let him in because it would be cruel not to. How lucky is that.
    Toby Young, I think you're talking about, he's a journalist. I went to a talk he did earlier this year, however his situation was a little bit different, he got an offer (for PPE) but then didn't get the grades. He was sent a 'what to do when you get to Oxford seeing as you've got in' sort of letter, and then a few days later a rejection, but his father (I think) called up the admissions office who spoke to the PPE people, who after a lot of debate, felt that after they'd basically told him he'd got in they had some sort of moral obligation to accept him despite the fact he didn't get the grades.
    So they did.
    And now he's very successful.
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    (Original post by myoldaccountbroke)
    Do Oxford ever make a mistake in sending out the wrong letter for example?
    My friend's brother received a rejection letter, and then two days later got accepted- great for him but what if it was the other way round!
    My friend got a letter inviting her to an interview, but then she received an e-mail telling her she'd been rejected!

    She called them up and the woman had to very apologetically inform her that she had in fact been rejected. So it does happen, but I would think that at this stage Oxford WON'T be making mistakes (hopefully!)
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    Didn't someone last year tell a story about two physics candidates--one outstanding and one average--who had the same name? Oxford accepted the worse candidate by mistake and rejected the brilliant one, who went on to accept another university's offer. When the tutors met the guy they'd accepted on the first day, they realised their mistake, but obviously couldn't turn him away. So they called up the one they'd rejected and asked him if he would be willing to give up his place at the other uni, take a gap year and come to Oxford next year, which he did. So in the end both candidates went to Oxford because of that mistake.

    I might have misreported some details, I don't remember the story very well. But I thought it was funny and kind of nice (if true).
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    could be from 2 different colleges?
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    (Original post by Phillipsherman)
    how bad would it be if they rejected him again saying the the acceptance was a mistake
    i love your sig
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    One of the Cambridge colleges sent rejection letters to all of their candidates in January 2009 (not sure if it was just for Natural Sciences or for all subjects).
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    (Original post by flywithemma)
    Toby Young, I think you're talking about, he's a journalist. I went to a talk he did earlier this year, however his situation was a little bit different, he got an offer (for PPE) but then didn't get the grades. He was sent a 'what to do when you get to Oxford seeing as you've got in' sort of letter, and then a few days later a rejection, but his father (I think) called up the admissions office who spoke to the PPE people, who after a lot of debate, felt that after they'd basically told him he'd got in they had some sort of moral obligation to accept him despite the fact he didn't get the grades.
    So they did.
    And now he's very successful.
    Ooh, that happened to me this year, except without the pushy parent to get me in anyways.
    I missed my grades, and then when I got home from picking up my results I had a 'congratulations Freshers!' email. And then got another one basically saying 'whoops we made a mistake, you're rejected'. In fact I continued to get such emails for the next two weeks until my remarks came back and then they really could legitimately send me the acceptance letters
    So receiving a mistaken acceptance letter doesn't always mean that they'll let you in anyways. (even though they ridiculously got my hopes up every time I got another email meant for freshers). They were quite apologetic about the mistakes though.
    • PS Helper
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    My mum works at a university (not oxbridge) and one year someone buggered up and sent offers to people they had intended to reject. I don't know if they had to or what but they let the people on the course anyway, rather than retract the offers. I think this was a post grad course, not sure if that is a factor or not
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    Check out the posts of this TSR member :

    Hannah=]

    ( the id does include the '=]' )

    She was rejected pre-interview this year, then told at a scarily late stage that it was a mistake and she had an interview after all, scurried up to Oxford pronto - and got an offer!
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    Thanks to this thread, I sit here in terror despite having received an offer. Thanks a lot >_>
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    (Original post by AnonymousPenguin)
    There's no such legal obligation.
    Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer ...yet - so this is not to be taken as legal advice.

    However, a contract is valid when there is an "offer" and an "acceptance." If Oxford extends you an "offer" of a place, and you do anything to signal your acceptance(whether or not you formally accept it through UCAS, reply, etc - the key here is intent), then it becomes a binding contract.

    Subsequently, if Oxford tries to renege on the offer, you may be able to obtain injunctive relief in court.
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    (Original post by Assassnum)
    that's why I thought it might be legally binding ... since my letter is signed by an Oxford official ..
    Signatures aren't important - the key here is the intent of the parties as best as a judge can determine.
 
 
 
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