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    It is not worth paying the extra tuition fee money for the sake of going to Oxford, a medicine degree anywhere is respected so I wouldn't risk applying to Oxford again just for another ego boost.
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    Considering you get an offer this cycle, if the possibility of going to Oxford over another med school outweighs the cost of £24k, a year of not doing medicine, and the risk of being rejected again/not getting any offers, go for it. You could try to work this out mathematically using arbitrary values, but I think it's down to whether or not you think you'd be able to let go of the idea of Oxford in a few years time. I assume most people wouldn't care once they've graduated.

    I guess a reconsideration of whether medicine is the right choice might be in order as well (something I'm considering) if you're fixated more on Oxford than medicine - indeed perhaps reapplying next year might give time to come to a firm decision. 6 years is a long time to spend somewhere you wouldn't want to be, but you never know how much you might enjoy your time at uni x. If you don't think you can significantly improve BMAT and interview performance, it's probably not worth it.
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    Hi all,

    Just looking for a bit of guidance with the reapplication process really - recently got rejected from Oxford to read Physics & Philosophy, and am pretty gutted about it. Much moreso than I thought I'd be. After weighing up my options, I want to wait until I get the feedback from the colleges to which I applied, and if it turns out it was something which I can help, such as my admission test score, or some module results, then I will be very tempted to retake these, bolster my application, and try again next year.
    However, it's a very difficult decision - I already have offers from UCL, Leicester, and KCL, and I think I might just be better gritting my teeth and accepting one of these. I know they are fantastic Universities in their own right, but let's not beat about the bush - Oxbridge is second to none, reputation-wise, and it's the kind of thing I can see myself thinking 'what if I had reapplied?' about for years to come.

    Anyway, I wondered if you guys could give me some of the pros and cons of reapplying in 2011 (besides the obvious fee increase) which would allow me to make a decent decision when the time comes.

    Many thanks!
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    I think the amount you'll pay extra isn't worth that tiny tiny extra bit of reputation you might get. Lots of big companies don't care whether you went to Oxbridge anyway, and UCL is really good (so are the others, but that's the uni I would pick!).

    Imagine how gutted you'd feel if you didn't get in the second time around as well. It's really not worth it.

    Edit: Just looked at your education spoiler. I think it's safe to say it wasn't your module marks!
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    (Original post by Lemons)
    I think the amount you'll pay extra isn't worth that tiny tiny extra bit of reputation you might get. Lots of big companies don't care whether you went to Oxbridge anyway, and UCL is really good (so are the others, but that's the uni I would pick!).

    Imagine how gutted you'd feel if you didn't get in the second time around as well. It's really not worth it.

    Edit: Just looked at your education spoiler. I think it's safe to say it wasn't your module marks!
    That's a fair point - I'm still waiting to hear from Durham, as well. It's just winding me up, missing out narrowly on Oxbridge. Oh well - could be much worse!
    Is it true that if I were to reapply, because I would've effectively declined offers from my other choices, I couldn't reapply to them next year?
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    Probably those physics marks that let you down.

    (Accept a different university)
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    (Original post by pinky198)
    That's a fair point - I'm still waiting to hear from Durham, as well. It's just winding me up, missing out narrowly on Oxbridge. Oh well - could be much worse!
    Is it true that if I were to reapply, because I would've effectively declined offers from my other choices, I couldn't reapply to them next year?
    I've no idea tbh, but I imagine they would find out. If I were in their position I would turn you down because there's obviously no point in giving you an offer!
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    Take one of the others. The extortionate fees kick in next year. Right when I'm going. *FML-face*
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    Pros:
    + you might get in
    + a gap year can be a very positive experience

    Cons:
    - you probably won't get in*
    - you could get ebola on your gap year & die.

    *Unless you can significantly improve some part of your application, your chances of getting in second time round won't be much higher, if at all higher, than first time round. Although second-time applicants have a higher success rate than first-time applicants, they're still rejected more often than not, so you have to be prepared for that consequence. I would advise you not to reapply if you think you gave a fair account of yourself in your interviews and your test score isn't much lower than you were expecting it to be.

    (Original post by pinky198)
    Is it true that if I were to reapply, because I would've effectively declined offers from my other choices, I couldn't reapply to them next year?
    No, that's not true at all. I applied to the same universities when I reapplied (albeit for a different subject) and was accepted by all of them, having withdrawn after results day (i.e. maximum opportunity for irritation). They have nothing to gain from rejecting you — if you're a good candidate, you'll get in next year too.
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    A significant number of people do reapply and get in. On the other hand, I was pretty gutted about my whole application and inevitable rejection, and immediately decided to reapply - only to find that, part-way into my gap year, I was happy to stay in London and, to be honest, was rather worried about just how big a dent my self-confidence could take from a second rejection. I withdrew my re-application and went to UCL in the end - and I haven't regretted it for a minute. No, it doesn't have the same reputation as Oxford, but there's always postgrad - I'm having an amazing time and regret the boring year I had waiting around for it.

    In sum...er...it's a very personal decision, but the truth is that if you DO decide to go to uni this year, you will probably be far too busy having a good time to wonder 'What if...?' - Which I didn't believe when people told me
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    (Original post by pinky198)
    Hi all,

    Just looking for a bit of guidance with the reapplication process really - recently got rejected from Oxford to read Physics & Philosophy, and am pretty gutted about it. Much moreso than I thought I'd be. After weighing up my options, I want to wait until I get the feedback from the colleges to which I applied, and if it turns out it was something which I can help, such as my admission test score, or some module results, then I will be very tempted to retake these, bolster my application, and try again next year.
    However, it's a very difficult decision - I already have offers from UCL, Leicester, and KCL, and I think I might just be better gritting my teeth and accepting one of these. I know they are fantastic Universities in their own right, but let's not beat about the bush - Oxbridge is second to none, reputation-wise, and it's the kind of thing I can see myself thinking 'what if I had reapplied?' about for years to come.

    Anyway, I wondered if you guys could give me some of the pros and cons of reapplying in 2011 (besides the obvious fee increase) which would allow me to make a decent decision when the time comes.

    Many thanks!
    This simply isn't true anymore. Not because Oxbridge has got worse, but because other places have got better.

    If you go to UCL, Imperial, LSE or Warwick you'll have just as good employment prospects as you would if you went to Oxbridge if you are of the same calibre as the Oxbridge student you are competing with. If you went to UCL and felt like that then you simply have an inflated view of Oxbridge. Fair enough about Leicester and KCL, but in the time you could do a degree and a masters at UCL, you would only have done an undergraduate degree at Oxbridge (admittedly you would get an MA too automatically, but that's basically worthless and even they admit it otherwise nobody from any other university in the UK would get onto prestigious MPhils at Oxbridge without having done a masters first).

    So basically if you go to UCL you won't regret it academically and mixing in the circles that you will mix in, you won't regret it prestige wise or have it hold you back. The only difference it will make is when you tell people where you go who know nothing about the university system and they'll be like OMGZ OXBRIDGE!!!1111. However it's simply not worth a gap year to gain bragging for rights to people whose opinions mean nothing.

    Basically in terms of academia if you want to maximise your reputation and job prospects you would be better off going to UCL then doing a masters rather than taking a gap year and doing 3 years at Oxford. The qualification you would get in the same four year period would be superior. Furthermore even if you had got into Oxford this year, you would not get anything better having a degree from Oxford than you would having a degree from UCL in the same subject. Anyone who tells you otherwise is completely misinformed and I can guarantee that the standard of the papers you do at UCL will be very similar to the standard you would do at Oxford and for some subjects will actually be harder!

    Good luck and while some people will disagree I really think you're inflating how good Oxford is relative to UCL. In terms of graduate prospects what you say holds for Kings and Leicester however, but certainly not for UCL.
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    (Original post by invictus_veritas)
    This simply isn't true anymore. Not because Oxbridge has got worse, but because other places have got better.

    If you go to UCL, Imperial, LSE or Warwick you'll have just as good employment prospects as you would if you went to Oxbridge if you are of the same calibre as the Oxbridge student you are competing with. If you went to UCL and felt like that then you simply have an inflated view of Oxbridge. Fair enough about Leicester and KCL, but in the time you could do a degree and a masters at UCL, you would only have done an undergraduate degree at Oxbridge (admittedly you would get an MA too automatically, but that's basically worthless and even they admit it otherwise nobody from any other university in the UK would get onto prestigious MPhils at Oxbridge without having done a masters first).

    So basically if you go to UCL you won't regret it academically and mixing in the circles that you will mix in, you won't regret it prestige wise or have it hold you back. The only difference it will make is when you tell people where you go who know nothing about the university system and they'll be like OMGZ OXBRIDGE!!!1111. However it's simply not worth a gap year to gain bragging for rights to people whose opinions mean nothing.

    Basically in terms of academia if you want to maximise your reputation and job prospects you would be better off going to UCL then doing a masters rather than taking a gap year and doing 3 years at Oxford. The qualification you would get in the same four year period would be superior. Furthermore even if you had got into Oxford this year, you would not get anything better having a degree from Oxford than you would having a degree from UCL in the same subject. Anyone who tells you otherwise is completely misinformed and I can guarantee that the standard of the papers you do at UCL will be very similar to the standard you would do at Oxford and for some subjects will actually be harder!

    Good luck and while some people will disagree I really think you're inflating how good Oxford is relative to UCL. In terms of graduate prospects what you say holds for Kings and Leicester however, but certainly not for UCL.
    Do you have any proof of this? (I'm just curious, as I have no first-hand experience with employers yet and it contradicts what I have heard)

    To OP: How did the PAT go? If you really want to go to Oxford, I guess this is a part that you could improve. I haven't seen the test so I'm not sure about the format, but one year of preparation should enable you to score quite well, no?
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    (Original post by pinky198)
    Hi all,

    Just looking for a bit of guidance with the reapplication process really - recently got rejected from Oxford to read Physics & Philosophy, and am pretty gutted about it. Much moreso than I thought I'd be. After weighing up my options, I want to wait until I get the feedback from the colleges to which I applied, and if it turns out it was something which I can help, such as my admission test score, or some module results, then I will be very tempted to retake these, bolster my application, and try again next year.
    However, it's a very difficult decision - I already have offers from UCL, Leicester, and KCL, and I think I might just be better gritting my teeth and accepting one of these. I know they are fantastic Universities in their own right, but let's not beat about the bush - Oxbridge is second to none, reputation-wise, and it's the kind of thing I can see myself thinking 'what if I had reapplied?' about for years to come.

    Anyway, I wondered if you guys could give me some of the pros and cons of reapplying in 2011 (besides the obvious fee increase) which would allow me to make a decent decision when the time comes.

    Many thanks!

    I think the issue here has to be how much you want to do the philosophy part of the course - because that's the section which is going to be different at Oxford than anywhere else. UCL is a very good university for science so you won't loose hardly anything by going there instead of Ox for physics, but you will loose half of what you would have studied as your degree. Yes, there is a chance you could be rejected again but many reapplicants do get in. Are you willing to risk that, spend an extra year before you go to uni and pay extortionately higher fees just to make sure you get to study philosophy in your degree? I think if you are considering it for employment prospects or reputation solely it would be better to go with UCL, Durham etc.
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    (Original post by Abstractineum)
    Do you have any proof of this? (I'm just curious, as I have no first-hand experience with employers yet and it contradicts what I have heard)

    To OP: How did the PAT go? If you really want to go to Oxford, I guess this is a part that you could improve. I haven't seen the test so I'm not sure about the format, but one year of preparation should enable you to score quite well, no?
    If you have heard things that contradict this then it's from misinformed individuals who don't understand how university/ employment works. They may well be managers or in recruiting for lower end careers and thus if you were trying to enter these an Oxbridge degree might be an advantage because of the ignorance of these people, who don't know how the university system has changed now with other universities being just as good or even sometimes better than Oxbridge. However for top flight careers where employers really know what they're talking about (and which you really should be going for if you go to a top university), then Oxbridge won't make a difference over UCL, LSE, Imperial, Warwick for comparable subjects. Thus I think you've been given advice by the wrong people.

    I remember in school a lot of careers advice I was given simply turned out to be completely wrong. It was great general advice, particularly if you were thinking of going to universities like Nottingham Trent or Portsmouth but actually turned out to be awful if you were bright, ambitious and aiming for an elite career.

    One example was law: we were told a lot of companies prefer non-law graduates to become solicitors and you derived no advantage in terms of getting into law if you did a law degree. This is simply not true. If you go to a top target university as law students are intensely targeted by law firms, whereas non-law students aren't. Plus in terms of getting placements and work experience it's a lot more difficult. I was the only person I know who was a non-law student to secure a mini-pupillage and that's with an exceptional CV. So yeah if anyone ever tells you that your job prospects are better doing the same subject at Oxbridge than at Imperial, LSE, UCL or Warwick then just ignore then because they have absolutely no idea what they're talking about. Arguably you're better off going to LSE/ UCL/ Imperial or Warwick in some instances because Oxbridge tries to train you more to be an academic and actively encourage it, whereas in these universities in the appropriate subject comparatively few people want to be academics but everyone wants to be a banker so potentially you could learn more from each other and make better contacts.

    Finally there's a really interesting time article which discusses this in relation to American universities, specifically Harvard and questions whether it's actually necessary or even that beneficial to go there over other top (or even bottom) lesser known places in the US. However what holds for there holds for here too, so take a look if you have time.

    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...226150,00.html
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    Interesting reading
    I agree with the idea of choosing university based on preference over brand name (maybe obvious...). But in the same way, if you (OP) think like UCL would feel like a let-down, I say go for Oxford. I believe in gut feeling You may want to wait a few weeks to get some perspective though.
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    (Original post by pinky198)
    Hi all,

    Just looking for a bit of guidance with the reapplication process really - recently got rejected from Oxford to read Physics & Philosophy, and am pretty gutted about it. Much moreso than I thought I'd be. After weighing up my options, I want to wait until I get the feedback from the colleges to which I applied, and if it turns out it was something which I can help, such as my admission test score, or some module results, then I will be very tempted to retake these, bolster my application, and try again next year.
    However, it's a very difficult decision - I already have offers from UCL, Leicester, and KCL, and I think I might just be better gritting my teeth and accepting one of these. I know they are fantastic Universities in their own right, but let's not beat about the bush - Oxbridge is second to none, reputation-wise, and it's the kind of thing I can see myself thinking 'what if I had reapplied?' about for years to come.

    Anyway, I wondered if you guys could give me some of the pros and cons of reapplying in 2011 (besides the obvious fee increase) which would allow me to make a decent decision when the time comes.

    Many thanks!
    I went through this phase, I know exactly how you're feeling, it isn't pleasant. HOWEVER, I really don't think re-applying would be a wise thing to do. No doubt you're obsessively weighing up the pros and cons in your head, so there's no point me reiterating them. The way I see it, once you're at UCL (or Durham), you will have forgotten about Oxford. It hurts now, but you'll get over it. With a good degree from UCL, you'll be fine. Factor in the fact that you could apply for Oxford postgrad if you really wanted to, and the fact that there is no certainty that you would get in second time round, and I really think you would be better off going to uni next year. But I empathise with your situation completely, best of luck whatever you decide.
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    Lots of good points made in this thread, from both sides of the argument. I would give most weight to the experience of Rubberband. If your love for Oxford doesn't subside while at UCL, work towards getting a First, with the aim of applying to Oxford post-grad.

    Best of luck whichever way you go!
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    (Original post by Abstractineum)
    Do you have any proof of this? (I'm just curious, as I have no first-hand experience with employers yet and it contradicts what I have heard)

    To OP: How did the PAT go? If you really want to go to Oxford, I guess this is a part that you could improve. I haven't seen the test so I'm not sure about the format, but one year of preparation should enable you to score quite well, no?
    http://www.careers.ox.ac.uk/?o=8285

    This link is amazing for seeing what employers think of Oxford students, and says that 50% (out of 300 top employers) think Oxford students are as likely or less likely than other students to have the main 'employability skills'.

    So that means 150 think Oxford students might be better, but 150 think they might be worse, or no better. I don't have stats for any other top unis, but Oxford clearly isn't the be all and end all for job recruiters.

    From my own experience with law firms, they really couldn't care less that I went to Oxford, and in fact sometimes graduate recruitment people can be quite 'iffy' about it because they think you're going to be really stuck up.
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    I was in a similar situation last year, and I took the gap year. Before I decided to, I got some very good advice from a few lovely teachers:

    Don't reapply just for the sake of it. You have to want a gap year. I was able to justify this to myself by getting a paid internship which would give me experience and money. If you take a gap year, don't let reapplying be the sole focus of it (though of course it's good to read... but that's fun anyway). That way, another rejection wouldn't hurt too badly - wouldn't want to feel you'd wasted a year.

    Universities don't really care that you've turned them down before, if you're a good candidate. They know that lots of people who they give offers to won't accept them, so I guess the admissions tutors just don't get too 'offended'. I messed around Durham (deferred entry, then withdrew on results day) and the same college still gave me an offer this time round. As did Warwick.
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    If I were you I wouldn't bother reapplying... I was unsuccessful applying to Oxford 2 years ago and ended up going to my 4th choice uni, but I'm having such a great time and I'm taking advantage of different opportunitites that I wouldn't have got at Oxford like a placement year. You may not have the prestige of saying "I went to Oxford" but your other unis are still good alternatives and I'd personally argue that getting a 1st from UCL (or other good uni) is just as good as getting a 2:1 from Oxford. More and more people are applying each year as well (though admittedly might decrease significantly with fees increasing), so your chances of being accepted at Oxford next year aren't necessarily any better. Also, your feedback from the college might not be that great - although I was applying for a different subject at a different college, my feedback letter just said that I wasn't as strong as other candidates, with no specific advice. So by all means wait and see what the letter says, but I think you'll have just as good a time if you go to one of the other unis and won't miss out on that much by not going to Oxford.
 
 
 
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