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    (Original post by ily_em)
    Not everybody knows how medical schools work and your answer doesn't do anything to help clear things up for the OP, does it?
    Those who have been on this forum for a long while get sick of the same questions again and again which can be easily answered with a search. The OP is lucky Renal didn't find this thread. :p:
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    (Original post by ryan118244)
    True, but I still think biology should be taken because it allows you to apply to way more med schools.
    yes, definately agreed. as well as finiding the work easier at med school (especially in first year) which is invaluable. however, if people have already not taken biology (and cant take it up just for a year) its important to let them know that all is not lost
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    (Original post by ryan118244)
    Haah, well is it the fact you want to go to Oxbridge or do medicine, you have to decide one or the other, you may not even get into Oxbridge for physics, in which case would you enjoy doing physics at another uni or would you prefer medicine. Also if you choose a subject like physics I doubt you would get into grad medicine, though you never know. And if your looking at it front a power career point of view then either will give you a great career, medicine maybe giving you a more powerful one though. Also if your looking at it from a wow point of view doing either is just impressive. Saying that you really need to be passionate about medicine to get in because it's such a hard gruelling process and it's one hard degree!!
    That's my problem, I genuinely don't know. I love physics, and medicine is intriguing. If I do physics, I really want to do it at a great uni, for three reasons. Firstly, I have two cousins who both did physics at Oxford, and they both loved it and recommend it, since I like physics There's also a hint of competition here, in my family. Secondly, I want to go to a university which is nice, in a really nice place. Lastly, loads of my teachers have strongly recommended I go for oxbridge, because they think I'm good enough, based on my grades.
    (Sorry if that sounded really arrogant, I didn't mean it like that)

    But on the other hand, I really want to do medicine because it's interesting to me, and because it'll get me a job at the end of it, whereas physics isn't quite as certain. I'm starting some medicine experience/volunteering in January, after my modular exams, so that should help me make my decision.


    (Original post by adam_zed)
    Sacred Hearts?
    Scrubs reference? If so, Heart*
    If not, I feel stupid.

    (Original post by blonde-beth)
    southampton. obviously :rolleyes:


    no, but there is a best medical school for everyone, depending on what you want. for example, oxford for me would have been a rubbish medical school, whereas cardiff (which is quite a lot lower down the 'rankings'( :rolleyes: ) would have been fantasic.


    but really, southampton.
    So oxford do lots of lectures I guess?

    (Original post by blonde-beth)
    not truee. keele, oxford and southampton all dont requite it (amoung others) and i know a few people who have got in without it, as it makes no difference at these places.

    however, i would highly recommend the op takes at least one year of it, as the people in my year who havnt done it are struggling with the work a bit.
    Yep, hopefully I'll be able to get onto a Biology AS course next year. The problem is I don't want to drop any of my 4 current AS levels... if I drop further maths, I won't even get an AS in it because of the way my school structures the course with the modules. I can't drop Chemistry. And if I drop Physics, then if I change my mind and want to go and study physics after all, I'm stuck. And if I'm doing 4 A2s and an AS... :/

    (Original post by Beska)
    When you're trying to decide on a medical school (or narrow down choices), there are lots of things to consider. The main one is obviously the course structure, the location, the accommodation, the city, etc. but the prestige of the medical school is not something that you need to consider, at all. The consensus is that it makes no difference on what job you get at all. As has been said, all medical schools are GMC accredited which means when you graduate, you're a doctor. The only difference is the way they teach.

    If you're a independent self-learner who doesn't like lectures, Oxbridge will be the worst medical school while somewhere like Manchester will be the best, for example.
    Yeah, I'm pretty thankful for the first bit, that it doesn't matter prestige-wise. And yep, I plan to go and look around at open days to find out course structures at different places.

    (Original post by ily_em)
    Not everybody knows how medical schools work and your answer doesn't do anything to help clear things up for the OP, does it?
    Thanks, but I confess, my title was an attempt to condense my question down, but it over simplified it and made me look stupid for asking such a pointless, unanswerable question. I like to think my question was more in-depth than the title would suggest


    (Original post by ryan118244)
    True, but I still think biology should be taken because it allows you to apply to way more med schools.
    ^^ A couple of quotes up, I've outlined my dilemma. I want to take Biology AS, but I don't know what to drop.

    (Original post by Vanny17)
    He will finally catch up, he is new on TSR.
    I plan to catch up soon. A couple of comments up, I explained what I really meant by my title.

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    (Original post by M1F2R3)
    It depends what you mean by "the best". Cambridge has a very high employment rate but so do most medical schools, in terms of equipment and teaching quality... I don't have the information to say, sorry.
    Which medical schools don't have a very high employment rate? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Those who have been on this forum for a long while get sick of the same questions again and again which can be easily answered with a search. The OP is lucky Renal didn't find this thread. :p:
    My thread wasn't quite as simple (I hope) as the title implied; check my previous post. I didn't mean to ask as simple a question as the thread title.

    (Original post by blonde-beth)
    yes, definately agreed. as well as finiding the work easier at med school (especially in first year) which is invaluable. however, if people have already not taken biology (and cant take it up just for a year) its important to let them know that all is not lost
    Thanks
    All is not lost
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    (Original post by Beska)
    The OP is lucky Renal didn't find this thread. :p:

    (Original post by Renal)
    Which medical schools don't have a very high employment rate? :rolleyes:

    Uh-oh.
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    John Hopkins
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    (Original post by Beska)
    The OP is lucky Renal didn't find this thread. :p:
    Too ****ing late.

    To be fair to the OP they are just ignorant. The people that really **** me off are the utter ***** who think that they should answer with a pile of *******s despite clearly knowing the square root of **** all about the subject at hand. We're it left to me, they'd have their eyes cored out with a potato peeler and their typing fingers worn down to dibbers with a belt sander.
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    (Original post by tcrwt)
    My thread wasn't quite as simple (I hope) as the title implied; check my previous post. I didn't mean to ask as simple a question as the thread title.
    No I understand, you wanted more of a discussion of which if the best rather than a single answer. However like I said, it really (more than any other subject) depends more on the way you want to learn than anything else - every university will turn you into a doctor, it is just the process which is different.


    (Original post by tcrwt)
    Uh-oh.
    Haha. :p:


    (Original post by M1F2R3)
    It depends what you mean by "the best". Cambridge has a very high employment rate but so do most medical schools, in terms of equipment and teaching quality... I don't have the information to say, sorry.

    I recall Cambridge having one of the lowest graduate employment (98%) for medical schools in the 2011 rankings, so if you're going to arbitrarily pick out Cambridge for having a high employment rate then stop speaking out your ass.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    Too ****ing late.

    To be fair to the OP they are just ignorant. The people that really **** me off are the utter ***** who think that they should answer with a pile of *******s despite clearly knowing the square root of **** all about the subject at hand. We're it left to me, they'd have their eyes cored out with a potato peeler and their typing fingers worn down to dibbers with a belt sander.
    This ^^ helps me understand this:

    (Original post by Beska)
    The OP is lucky Renal didn't find this thread. :p:

    (Original post by Beska)
    No I understand, you wanted more of a discussion of which if the best rather than a single answer. However like I said, it really (more than any other subject) depends more on the way you want to learn than anything else - every university will turn you into a doctor, it is just the process which is different.
    Yeah, exactly. I'm looking for pros and cons. I'm looking for what to look out for and what to ask about when I go to open days. I'm looking for lively discussion.

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    (Original post by Beska)
    I recall Cambridge having one of the lowest graduate employment (98%) for medical schools in the 2011 rankings, so if you're going to arbitrarily pick out Cambridge for having a high employment rate then stop speaking out your ass.

    http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...e.htm?ipg=8727

    From here? Is this a trustworthy list?
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    (Original post by tcrwt)
    This ^^ helps me understand this:

    Yeah, exactly. I'm looking for pros and cons. I'm looking for what to look out for and what to ask about when I go to open days. I'm looking for lively discussion.

    Have a look at this for a list of pros and cons. It's not too early to order in lots of prospectuses and start reading them and start discounting universities straight away. Have a look at this wiki page and this wiki page for some more advice.




    (Original post by tcrwt)
    http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...e.htm?ipg=8727

    From here? Is this a trustworthy list?
    Yeh, that's The Independent's university ranking list. Generally, the rule of thumb don't pay attention to ranking for medicine but it is sometimes useful to look at the criteria which make up the sections - eg student satisfaction with the course/with the teaching.
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    Imperial college london!
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Have a look at this for a list of pros and cons. It's not too early to order in lots of prospectuses and start reading them and start discounting universities straight away. Have a look at this wiki page and this wiki page for some more advice.
    Ah, fantastic, thank you
    Do I just get prospectuses from uni websites? Or is there an easy way to get lots in without going to all the websites? (Sorry if that's a stupid, obvious question to all you uni experts)

    (Original post by Beska)
    Yeh, that's The Independent's university ranking list. Generally, the rule of thumb don't pay attention to ranking for medicine but it is sometimes useful to look at the criteria which make up the sections - eg student satisfaction with the course/with the teaching.
    Is the medicine ranking irrelevant? Why?
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    (Original post by tcrwt)
    Yeah, I did think it was the case that they don't know where you studied.

    Are there many that will accept me without Biology?
    Newcastle will accept you without biology and it is a great medical school!
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    (Original post by tcrwt)
    Ah, fantastic, thank you
    Do I just get prospectuses from uni websites? Or is there an easy way to get lots in without going to all the websites? (Sorry if that's a stupid, obvious question to all you uni experts)

    Is the medicine ranking irrelevant? Why?
    All from the individual websites. Look at the wiki links I posted so you have a list of all the medical schools, then just Google "<medical school> order prospectus" or something. There's no easier way than to just go to all the websites, nope. It is a massive pain. :p:

    The ranking is irrelevant because it really doesn't mean that much. For example, if you really like Keele's PBL course (and you hate Nottingham's traditional(ish) one) but you see that Nottingham has a higher ranking so you apply there, it is a mistake. You should apply to the one which you prefer. I know that is a little bit of a haphazard example, but do you get my point?
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    Personally I agree with your friends, its defintely Cambridge.
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    (Original post by tcrwt)
    Ah, I might struggle without biology then. I guess I'll do AS Biology next year then :/

    I did read that some don't require it, so I guess if Oxbridge isn't that much above the rest, I could just go somewhere else.

    Or, I could forget medicine and go for physics at Oxbridge :/

    I HATE THINGS LIKE THIS I CAN'T DECIDE!

    Thanks very much for your help btw
    It's perfectly possible to apply to medicine without any form of biology beyond GCSE.

    Check: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...l_Requirements

    Unless things have changed since 2008, you can most certainly get in to Oxford without A-level biology.


    (Original post by ryan118244)
    . You have to do biology, I think you would find it very hard to get into med school without it.

    Not necessarily true, it just limits which schools you can apply to

    . Oxbridge doesnt have a higher employment rate for mediicne because all med schools have 99% / 100% employment rate. Also you go onto do foundation years after your med degree, and the university you went to is annonymous and so prestige cannot affect you, therefore going to oxbridge would not give you any advantages as getting in depends on your exam results and where you rank in your med school.

    True to an extent. However, Oxbridgers generally rank higher in terms of first-time pass rates for post-graduate exams (although I do realise you addressed this below) but more recently in achieving first choice foundation programme spot (at least compared to London). Whether or not this reflects better doctoring is debateable, of course, but it does not mean it doesn't have some influence on progression.

    . Also oxbridge dosent have any better equipment, if anything the new med schools would probably be better. But all med schools will have grear facilities.

    Again, in many respects true. Then again, I've never had to buy a book - amongst other bonuses.

    . Usually this type of question sparks arguments as too who thinks there med school is the best and often this is caused because some people think oxbridge is best because they think its best for everything, thats why people probably commented about you in that way haha

    . It is true that oxbridge can lack clinically, but that could just be due to the type of students. Heres a link to a page which shows exam results of diff med schools:
    http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/6/5/

    BUT BE CAREFUL, as the results are dated and back then there use to be huge differneces in entry requirements which would have affected exam results greatly, also now adays you will find that pretty much everywhere does just as well in exams and they all the med school have pretty much the same entry requirements.

    . Yea med schools do have a teaching hospital attached, apart from St Andrews as there arent really any hospitals by it, they do there clinical training at another med school.

    . So basically go for a med school for which you LIKE the teaching style and the university and area etc etc, because then you will ultimately do better there

    Probably right here.

    (Original post by nerimon18)
    Personally I agree with your friends, its defintely Cambridge.
    This made me lol.
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    Bath. :bl:
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    oh, and the 'insiders guide to medical schools' is quite good (a book) but no substitute for actually visiting and chatting to current students.
 
 
 
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