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Thinking of quitting work without notice Watch

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    (Original post by TravelGuru)
    Ucas applications require references too you know. So unless you don't intend on using them then yes throw your middle finger up to them.
    I've volunteered for scouts since age 15 and have numerous others willing to provide reference.
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    Do you work for a private healthcare agency?

    I did and they more or less made my life hell. Obviously under different circumstances.

    Leaving them was like a huge weight off my shoulders. Leave them and go into your nursing. Well, apply.
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    (Original post by Guy Secretan)
    Just get another job and when they phone you up tell them to **** off
    That kind of behaviour is called a copout. I assume the OP has signed some kind of contract with his employer and it must have a provision about the amount of notice required. Although the way they are treating him may be unacceptable that is no excuse for breach of contract and even if he hasnt signed a contract human decency demands that he at least inform them of his decision to leave. To up and leave without telling them is downright irresponsible.
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    (Original post by Enchanté)
    Do you work for a private healthcare agency?

    I did and they more or less made my life hell. Obviously under different circumstances.

    Leaving them was like a huge weight off my shoulders. Leave them and go into your nursing. Well, apply.
    No, a Private Domicillary Care Agency. I basically work in service users own homes and help them to live independently. That ranges from assisting them with personal hygine (In cases wiping their bum, putting a pad on them), preparing meals, prompting and monitoring medication, monitoring their well being and enhancing their social/domestic lives in little ways.

    It's very rewarding, and I love the job, but it's unsustainable because the pay and general working conditions are abysmal. My care agency runs on a shoe string. There's a major shortage of staff, there are no bank staff (Go figure given the incentives), the second someone goes off sick we're held to randsom. Most importantly, the service users recive inadequate care as a result because of the short comings of the middle managment and the capitalist approach the company (Which is multi-national and widely diversified) has toward the living standards of those under it's care. It's sickening. My service users tell me they don't know what they'd do without me because they know I endeavour to do my best at all times for them and most importantly care.

    The logistics side is very disjointed and disconcerting for me because we often technically break clientside contract in the context of timeliness and staying for contracted hours (Because we're put under extreme pressue with regard to workload, they don't consider travelling time between calls, so they jam pack a period of time on rota, and it's your job to catch up).

    For example, I'm now rota'd down to start at 7am. But every bus into the area I work, which is 6 miles away, only starts at 7:06am. They've been told about this numerous times, and they don't care. It's so they can fit more in - on paper.

    I provide off my own back a consistent, quality and bespoke service for my clients because that's what they deserve - it's them I feel sorry for.
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    (Original post by PrettyBored)
    No, a Private Domicillary Care Agency. I basically work in service users own homes and help them to live independently. That ranges from assisting them with personal hygine (In cases wiping their bum, putting a pad on them), preparing meals, prompting and monitoring medication, monitoring their well being and enhancing their social/domestic lives in little ways.

    It's very rewarding, and I love the job, but it's unsustainable because the pay and general working conditions are abysmal. My care agency runs on a shoe string. There's a major shortage of staff, there are no bank staff (Go figure given the incentives), the second someone goes off sick we're held to randsom. Most importantly, the service users recive inadequate care as a result because of the short comings of the middle managment and the capitalist approach the company (Which is multi-national and widely diversified) has toward the living standards of those under it's care. It's sickening. My service users tell me they don't know what they'd do without me because they know I endeavour to do my best at all times for them and most importantly care.

    I provide off my own back a consistent, quality and bespoke service because that's what they deserve - it's them I feel sorry for.

    That's what I worked for. Domcillary
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    I know how awful it is to work for people who don't appreciate it. I had a job in newsagents with a really tight manager, he didn't spend money on anything. I was on 2.50 an hour and worked 6-10 at night Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Mondays.

    He was in such a bad mood by the time it was my shift... shouting at me, throwing loads of stuff off the shelves and making me re-do them. He made me do all of the hardest work for next to nothing.

    I'd recommend quitting. Find a Job with people who appreciate you.
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    (Original post by professortobe)
    That kind of behaviour is called a copout. I assume the OP has signed some kind of contract with his employer and it must have a provision about the amount of notice required. Although the way they are treating him may be unacceptable that is no excuse for breach of contract and even if he hasnt signed a contract human decency demands that he at least inform them of his decision to leave. To up and leave without telling them is downright irresponsible.
    It's not a breach for contract as they broke it by refusing him his right of sickness leave. They are the irresponsible ones by not giving him time off as it means he might not be able to donhis job effectively. Also all this stuff about references is a pile of **** as they prob wouldn't give him a good reference anyway and there are plenty of places you can get a reference from.
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    (Original post by Guy Secretan)
    It's not a breach for contract as they broke it by refusing him his right of sickness leave. They are the irresponsible ones by not giving him time off as it means he might not be able to donhis job effectively.
    I was extremely concerned by the Manual handling calls I had this morning, of which there were two. One of my clients has late stage parkinsons, and can only safely move with primary assistance. I have to bear his own weight and my own whilst vocally and physically co-ordinating his movements, shower him, and dress him in a poorly equiped, extremely small bathroom.

    With a sprained ankle, I would not be able to effectively compensate any leaning or sudden obtuse movements he is prone to.
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    (Original post by PrettyBored)
    I was extremely concerned by the Manual handling calls I had this morning, of which there were two. One of my clients has late stage parkinsons, and can only safely move with primary assistance. I have to bear his own weight and my own whilst vocally and physically co-ordinating his movements, shower him, and dress him in a poorly equiped, extremely small bathroom.

    With a sprained ankle, I would not be able to effectively compensate any leaning or sudden obtuse movements he is prone to.
    Yeah they are the ones in the wrong by trying to guilt trip you aboutt their own failings and understaffing, social work departments do this aswell. Also if you are thinking of going in to nursing it would be a good reference but you could get one just as easily from your school which is fine for ucas. Can I ask how much you get paid? Just wondered
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    (Original post by PrettyBored)
    £5.90 for an hour call
    £3.54 for a half hour call.

    No pay between travelling, I do about 2-4 hours travelling on foot every day.
    Yeah they are totally ripping you off, you could get 5.70 working in tescos it wouldn't be fun but I imagine a lot better than wiping old guys arses. Also if they are being privately contracted they probably get a lot more from the government for work which you are effectively doing on your own.
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    (Original post by Guy Secretan)
    Yeah they are totally ripping you off, you could get 5.70 working in tescos it wouldn't be fun but I imagine a lot better than wiping old guys arses.
    £5.90 for an hour call
    £3.54 for a half hour call.

    No pay between travelling, I do about 2-5 hours travelling on foot every day.

    Then theres dead time, your last tea call is at 16:30. But you have a singular bed call at 20:00. Nothing inbetween, miles from home. Hang around in ice cold, for £3.54. It's unbeliveable how they can get away with it.
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    If you wanna quit, give them your notice and tell them to take the hours you were due to work from your accrued annual leave.
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    To the OP, I would see your GP, explain your job, and ask if he considers you are fit for work. If he does you return to work and give notice as required if this is your wish.

    If he signs you of sick pass sick note to employer. Depending on past earnings/ length of service and/or contract you may be entitled to SSP (Statutory sick pay) or contractual sick pay if the contract grants same.

    Your contract of employment should stipulate the notice you require to give, this ought to have been issued to you. In the absence of a contract I expect you are due to give one week's notice. (Depends on length of service> I month < 2 years)

    I would do things correctly.
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    If he signs you of sick pass sick note to employer. Depending on past earnings/ length of service and/or contract you may be entitled to SSP (Statutory sick pay) or contractual sick pay if the contract grants same.
    I don't understand how I cant be eligible regardless, I pay national insurance.
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    (Original post by Guy Secretan)
    It's not a breach for contract as they broke it by refusing him his right of sickness leave. They are the irresponsible ones by not giving him time off as it means he might not be able to donhis job effectively. Also all this stuff about references is a pile of **** as they prob wouldn't give him a good reference anyway and there are plenty of places you can get a reference from.
    You may have heard the expression two wrongs dont make a right and in the case of contract law that is certainly the case. OPs employer is definitely in the wrong for refusing him sick leave but that doesnt give him an excuse to copout of the job without telling them. Just coz they are irresponsible doesnt mean a decent person should do the same back.
    Dont know if he signed a contract with them but if he did it will certainly have a clause about giving notice and although it should have a clause about sickness leave it may not. If it does he should definitely email his boss a copy of clause and say he is taking sickness leave under section x of his employment contract until further notice and that failure to allow him this may result in him taking legal action against them.
    If he doesnt have a contract with them he should at the very least call his boss and tell him that due to the unreasonable refusal of sick leave he will be forced to hand in immediate notice and will not be returning to work. It has nothing to do with references (which btw are not a load of **** they are important for getting into a competitive degree course like nursing) its just the decent thing to do.
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    (Original post by PrettyBored)
    I don't understand how I cant be eligible regardless, I pay national insurance.
    I had no knowledge when posting of your earning level, hence the caveat.

    Undernoted gives more detail:

    "Who can get Statutory Sick Pay

    You may be able to get Statutory Sick Pay (SSP), if you have:

    * been sick for at least four or more days in a row (including weekends, bank holidays and days that you do not normally work)
    * average weekly earnings equal to or more than the Lower Earnings Limit (LEL)

    Lower Earnings Limit (LEL)

    The LEL is the amount you would need to earn before you start paying National Insurance Contributions. From 6 April 2010, the LEL is £97 a week.
    How average earnings are worked out

    From 6 April 2010, you must have average earnings of £97 a week before tax and National Insurance contributions are deducted.

    Your average weekly earnings are calculated over the eight weeks before your sickness began. This period may vary slightly depending on whether you are paid weekly, monthly or have other pay patterns. If you have just started your job the calculation may be different, contact your employer for more information.

    Only earnings actually paid in this eight week period can be used for the average weekly earnings calculation. These earnings must be subject to National Insurance Contributions or would be if your earnings were high enough and may include:

    * your normal earnings
    * bonuses
    * holiday pay
    * overtime
    * other Statutory Payments"

    Trust this helps.

    The key is have you actually told your employer you are unfit for work?
 
 
 
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