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Lack of UCAS points letting me down :( Watch

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    (Original post by cazmaj)
    Lol...

    I appreciate the advice guys!



    On the spelling police thing, if you weren't scrutinising others 4am spelling of a homophone then you might read what they were saying, I said "I don't seem to be even eligible to apply to most descent graduate jobs", not I think my UCAS points are responsible for me not getting jobs.

    Anyway...

    I have to agree with the people who are of the opinion that many applicants are filtered out solely on the basis of UCAS points. Even if an application gets viewed by an actual person it surely is not a stretch of the imagination to see them wanting to reduce their load on the basis of low UCAS scores and with the modern day electronic medium for applying the applicant is further restricted to draw attention to any reasons or alternatives for these UCAS scores (eg. a small "NB Please see reasons for low scores in 'Section B'" hand written beside the scores). While I think that some may not take recently achieved A Levels in the same regard as ones achieved just after school, I think they are almost certain to increase chances for the applicant to proceed.

    I think I just need to get more applications out and perhaps follow the advice from earlier to try calling the HR department of the company.

    For the minute I am going to continue trying for graduate jobs but the looming need for food and shelter will probably have me working wherever the hell I can soon enough!

    Thanks again for all the input! Happy Christmas guys! :wavey:
    My advice, don't do a masters like I did if you think that might help. You limit your options after doing it unfortunately. Spend a year doing 3 fast track A level courses (1 year courses) on jobseekers allowance you can get the courses paid for free by the government and after the year you will have your A levels. Failing that; then you could do your masters and i'd think you'd definitely be in for a shot at the top companies, because you can definitely say that you done your A levels prior to your masters.

    That's, of course, how I would have done it; given hindsight.
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    (Original post by akhan789)
    My advice, don't do a masters like I did if you think that might help. You limit your options after doing it unfortunately. Spend a year doing 3 fast track A level courses (1 year courses) on jobseekers allowance you can get the courses paid for free by the government and after the year you will have your A levels. Failing that; then you could do your masters and i'd think you'd definitely be in for a shot at the top companies, because you can definitely say that you done your A levels prior to your masters.

    That's, of course, how I would have done it; given hindsight.
    Thanks for the advice, very much appreciated!
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    Graduated with First Class Honours, but was unable to apply for certain jobs as my A levels were BBC. Instead, people who barely scraped a 2.1 (that barely understood the work and so I spent most my time helping) could apply for these jobs. Stupid system!
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    (Original post by Einheri)
    If you're going to criticize someone else's spelling then you can at least spell correctly yourself, use proper grammar, punctuate and capitalize. Just for you:

    And it's not all about UCAS points. Try and make your application stronger in other places, man.
    One of the commas is wrong. :mad:
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    (Original post by TheProdigy2k9)
    didn't know i made a spelling mistake?
    so **** youuuu
    Contracting it is to its is a spelling mistake.
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    (Original post by Kt.b)
    One of the commas is wrong. :mad:
    I don't see it. If you're referring to "places, man" then you'd be wrong.
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    (Original post by Einheri)
    Contracting it is to its is a spelling mistake.
    I said I didn't know I made a spelling mistake you ****ing retard.
    Read properly and then reply you ****ing idiot.
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    (Original post by TheProdigy2k9)
    I said I didn't know I made a spelling mistake you ****ing retard.
    Read properly and then reply you ****ing idiot.
    You said "didn't know i made a spelling mistake?", that's a question not a statement. The way you punctuated the sentence suggested that you didn't know what you spelled wrong. If you had wanted to make a statement to the effect that you didn't know when writing it you shouldn't have included a question mark as it completely confused the meaning of the sentence. How can I read it properly if you haven't punctuated it properly? You illiterate clown.
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    You're all a bunch of ********s, hijacking this post. Pathetic. If you're gonna say something, at least let it be on topic. Who actually cares about spelling?

    There are people like me and the OP that are concerned and would like advice on how we should get a job. And you guys on here just trying to start a flame war. Seriously grow up and get a life.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Try and think about the logic of that from the employers point of view. Why would an employer be rejecting a Masters degree candidate on the basis of their A level grades? There are two reasons - firstly, because they want candidates that have proven academic strength at all stages of their education or secondly because they want to filter out weak candidates.

    If you are being rejected by an employer because you do not have a continuous history of academic excellence, taking your A levels when you are about 23, and have completed a Masters degree does absolutely nothing to change that.

    If they use it as a filter to root out weaker candidates, then you need to contact them and ask them if this is an automatic filter or a human one. I have no point scores to my A levels (took them too long ago!) but I have asked HR in very many companies (PwC, Capgemini, OW, RB, McKinsey, Bain, BCG, Deloitte and half a dozen others I can't remember now) and they ALL said that a human being reads every CV and makes a decision based on all the facts available. In which case, they are either still making the decision to reject you based on the first option above, or because there is some other weakness in your application.

    I'm sorry, but employers are rarely complete idiots. If you have a Masters degree in a relevant subject, they will not exclude your application on the basis of your A levels. You need to take another look at how you are completing your applications, what you are applying for etc. Don't waste time re-sitting A levels.
    You are assuming that ALs are taught equally across the board, when the best schools have the best teachers, smaller class sizes and 1-1 tutors for struggling students. Meaning those that are not naturally clever still have a better chance of obtaining good marks. My state school had to stop teaching AL maths, because the pass mark was so low. Do you think that would ever happen at Eton?

    Tired to death of this argument, because I am facing the same problem as the OP with extremely good work experience where I have won industry awards/ represented my company at award ceremonies, and have press releases. Yet I am contemplating redoing my alevels 7 years on.

    I had mitigating circumstances at the time too - but still its all 50-50 for companies who essentially do the same thing as I what I am doing right now, on a larger scale
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    {Insert Thread Revival Memes here}

    I'm always confused as to how 2.5+ year old threads suddenly get revived. I'm not helping by posting either...
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    (Original post by bdj)
    {Insert Thread Revival Memes here}

    I'm always confused as to how 2.5+ year old threads suddenly get revived. I'm not helping by posting either...
    I revived it, because I was looking for the answer to this question too. Happened to have stumbled on this thread. After reading that girls comment, I was like
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    Another bump, but I think a deserved one with the recent news.

    It looks like PwC are scrapping UCAS requirements almost entirely save for a few of their positions like strategy consulting starting 1st June. The thread topic is something which concerns me and as a mature 1st year student at Southampton doing A + F it's good news. I've been doing everything in terms of planning to see how I could get around this for the next 3 years, including potentially doing a Masters at LSE/Oxford/Warwick like a lot of people tried to do in this thread. Seemed the logical thing to do, but looks like it wasn't successful for a lot of people, good luck to you guys by the way.

    Other things on the list to do in terms of standing out, potential internship with the central bank back home, thrown myself into all events and societies which include some element of finance/entrepreneurship/team work, elected course rep for next year. Sitting standardised tests (GMAT in the summer, LSATs summer 2016), learning Portuguese (already know 3 languages), sit Bloomberg test 2nd year, run a marathon for a cause 2nd year, learning MATLAB/Bloomberg terminal already. I think I will accomplish a lot of it, maybe not all, but i'll give it a try. And I guess it's no guarantee i'll score high in the standardised tests, my degree subjects etc as time progresses, but i'm certainly capable. I also have 4 ACCA exemptions and sitting CFA level II in June. I'll try make progress with these, but obviously it's difficult, if I can clear level II though that could help possibly?

    I guess my question is then, does anyone know how likely other firms are to follow suit after this announcement. I imagine not much luck with a McKinsey/BCG/Bain/Goldman/JP Morgan? One of the posters in here reckons the likes of McKinsey actually use a human rather than computer, would it be worth just calling the company HR departments for these companies and just forwarding my CV when the time comes round, if I do go on to build up a potential profile like that?

    I'm also an Int'l student not sure if that helps or hinders me tbh. I don't really want to stay in the UK long term but was hoping when I do leave i'd have something substantial whether that's a degree from LSE/Oxford or a big internship/2 years at a Mckinsey/Goldman or whatever. Ofcourse I'll apply to PwC eventually, and it's definitely a great company, was just curious whether other employers will follow soon or if there's a timeline or something.

    Any help appreciate. You're free to mock as well haha.
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    (Original post by TheEnt)
    Another bump, but I think a deserved one with the recent news.

    It looks like PwC are scrapping UCAS requirements almost entirely save for a few of their positions like strategy consulting starting 1st June. The thread topic is something which concerns me and as a mature 1st year student at Southampton doing A + F it's good news. I've been doing everything in terms of planning to see how I could get around this for the next 3 years, including potentially doing a Masters at LSE/Oxford/Warwick like a lot of people tried to do in this thread. Seemed the logical thing to do, but looks like it wasn't successful for a lot of people, good luck to you guys by the way.

    Other things on the list to do in terms of standing out, potential internship with the central bank back home, thrown myself into all events and societies which include some element of finance/entrepreneurship/team work, elected course rep for next year. Sitting standardised tests (GMAT in the summer, LSATs summer 2016), learning Portuguese (already know 3 languages), sit Bloomberg test 2nd year, run a marathon for a cause 2nd year, learning MATLAB/Bloomberg terminal already. I think I will accomplish a lot of it, maybe not all, but i'll give it a try. And I guess it's no guarantee i'll score high in the standardised tests, my degree subjects etc as time progresses, but i'm certainly capable. I also have 4 ACCA exemptions and sitting CFA level II in June. I'll try make progress with these, but obviously it's difficult, if I can clear level II though that could help possibly?

    I guess my question is then, does anyone know how likely other firms are to follow suit after this announcement. I imagine not much luck with a McKinsey/BCG/Bain/Goldman/JP Morgan? One of the posters in here reckons the likes of McKinsey actually use a human rather than computer, would it be worth just calling the company HR departments for these companies and just forwarding my CV when the time comes round, if I do go on to build up a potential profile like that?

    I'm also an Int'l student not sure if that helps or hinders me tbh. I don't really want to stay in the UK long term but was hoping when I do leave i'd have something substantial whether that's a degree from LSE/Oxford or a big internship/2 years at a Mckinsey/Goldman or whatever. Ofcourse I'll apply to PwC eventually, and it's definitely a great company, was just curious whether other employers will follow soon or if there's a timeline or something.

    Any help appreciate. You're free to mock as well haha.
    The news about PwC isn't as big as everyone makes out. Only 38% of graduate employers use A-levels as a pure screening filter. Of the 62% that don't, many still ask for A-level grades (PwC will still be asking for you to provide them or any equivalent).

    Very few organisations use computers to screen. Even those that do filter out by A-level tend to get a human to do it.

    Everything else you have said about building up your CV - great! Although honestly, I don't think sitting those tests will help though.

    If you have got international qualifications, why are you even worrying about this though?

    Also, if you don't want to stay in the UK too long, I suspect this will be your main issue with a number of employers. If they are going to train/develop you, they want a return on that investment locally. Your best bet will be to focus on organisations where they have a strong presence in wherever you want to work longer term.


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    (Original post by TheEnt)
    Another bump, but I think a deserved one with the recent news.

    It looks like PwC are scrapping UCAS requirements almost entirely save for a few of their positions like strategy consulting starting 1st June. The thread topic is something which concerns me and as a mature 1st year student at Southampton doing A + F it's good news. I've been doing everything in terms of planning to see how I could get around this for the next 3 years, including potentially doing a Masters at LSE/Oxford/Warwick like a lot of people tried to do in this thread. Seemed the logical thing to do, but looks like it wasn't successful for a lot of people, good luck to you guys by the way.

    Other things on the list to do in terms of standing out, potential internship with the central bank back home, thrown myself into all events and societies which include some element of finance/entrepreneurship/team work, elected course rep for next year. Sitting standardised tests (GMAT in the summer, LSATs summer 2016), learning Portuguese (already know 3 languages), sit Bloomberg test 2nd year, run a marathon for a cause 2nd year, learning MATLAB/Bloomberg terminal already. I think I will accomplish a lot of it, maybe not all, but i'll give it a try. And I guess it's no guarantee i'll score high in the standardised tests, my degree subjects etc as time progresses, but i'm certainly capable. I also have 4 ACCA exemptions and sitting CFA level II in June. I'll try make progress with these, but obviously it's difficult, if I can clear level II though that could help possibly?

    I guess my question is then, does anyone know how likely other firms are to follow suit after this announcement. I imagine not much luck with a McKinsey/BCG/Bain/Goldman/JP Morgan? One of the posters in here reckons the likes of McKinsey actually use a human rather than computer, would it be worth just calling the company HR departments for these companies and just forwarding my CV when the time comes round, if I do go on to build up a potential profile like that?

    I'm also an Int'l student not sure if that helps or hinders me tbh. I don't really want to stay in the UK long term but was hoping when I do leave i'd have something substantial whether that's a degree from LSE/Oxford or a big internship/2 years at a Mckinsey/Goldman or whatever. Ofcourse I'll apply to PwC eventually, and it's definitely a great company, was just curious whether other employers will follow soon or if there's a timeline or something.

    Any help appreciate. You're free to mock as well haha.
    Also if you are international as in non EU you need to meet requirements and be sponsored to stay in the UK beyond your degree
 
 
 
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