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    (Original post by wherethebeaverlive)
    not necessarily. it's harder to get a law degree from east anglia (they require aab i think) than to get a sociology one from warwick-BBB
    Law is way harder than a degree like sociology or media studies no matter what uni you attend. Surely a degree should be more important?
    ...and what do you base that on, good sir?

    Sociology at LSE is easier than Law at London Met, by your logic.

    So a law graduate from London Met must have a more valuable degree than the LSE sociology graduate?

    Wrong.
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    (Original post by Doughnuts!!)
    Can you answer my question please? Nobody has actually given a definitive answer yet!!
    All the top banks have target unis. Generally speaking, the top 6 unis. Consensus is the less prestigious the uni, the more relevant your degree needs to be. Which is why it's not an unusual sight to see History grads from Cambridge going into banking, but you'd be hard pressed to find a Histrory grad from Lancaster in a front office job.

    Law is fairly competitive at the targets so you'll have the pedigree, but you're going to to have to be really convincing when explaining why you want to go into IB in your cover letters and interviews (as opposed to Corporate Law, for example).

    (Original post by i_hate_teeth)
    But don't most people use these graduate level FO postions as a stepping stone to something more tenable such as PE, VC, HF insurance etc.

    In the case of somebody wanting to work for for VC that specialises in biotechnology or software, wouldn't a scientific degree be more useful than something unrelated to science?
    Exit opps are more the rage in the US, culture in Europe is more so to stay in banking.

    Lots of hard science grads go into VC but your degree doesnt matter. Most good shops will want you to have been an analyst for at least two years at a bank before they'll take you on. Good deal experience and being able to show a genuine interest in Tech is what gets you into VC.
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    I've heard of people getting in IB after studying theology.

    Actually it was this guy: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/member.php?u=409500
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    (Original post by Doughnuts!!)
    I don't know much about IB but I vaguely know the difference between FO and BO. I'm just curious as to whether or not somebody could end up in FO with a Law degree. If it is possible, what sorts of roles are available for somebody with a Law degree?
    I work for an investment bank now. Generally speaking most of them have very similar requirements as to who can work there and who doesn't.

    Like most prestigious professional careers, it's still largely a "same school tie" club when it comes to hiring anyone. Just so you know, resume screenings are done by software these days not an actual person who reads resumes one by one.

    I started out with a US investment bank after my first degree in international finance from a US university.

    I did a 2nd degree in law from Aberystwyth University because after 8 years in IB I was getting a bit fed up with it. Thought it would be cool to be a lawyer But it turned out after graduating I couldn't foresee myself liking this either so I went back to....................... you guessed it an IB Though not the same one I was with before.

    Starting out at an IB as a graduate, I will be frank with you...... contrary to what everyone likes to tell themselves, what university you come from matters absolutely. The subject you studied at university, this one depends on the bank, some IBs will take in almost any discipline for as long as the university is on their "preferred" list. That list will almost always be the Top 10 in the country. Therefore even if you had a degree in some weird mickey mouse study but it came from Oxford and you had a 2.1, you will be invited for an interview at the bank.

    However some banks are quite strict with what their graduate trainees come in with, usually even if it says "any discipline" it will still invariably favour those who have taken business or financial related courses, economics, mathematics and most will have law as their favoured list as well.

    When it comes to hiring a law graduate, there is a certain "magic" formula, if it is Ox/Cam then a 2.1 or above is fine, though if the hiring manager is a Ox/Cam graduate himself, and he had gone back to his alma matter he may consider to interview someone who has a high 2:2, not to be sexist.... usually those who would stand a chance on this will almost always be a pretty female who can attract the attention of that manager due to her outstanding communication skills. Then it is the next top 10 universities, these the cut-off point would normally be a high 2:1 and a strong interest in financial services, you can prove this by having done internships at financial institutions, vac schemes with firms that specializes in banking work (good references are essential) and usually you can make a convincing case when you could show a transcript that displays courses which are commercial or financial by nature...... doesn't even have to be a law module..... could be a course from the business school for example.

    As for positions you can do, it is extremely rare that what you studied in university will determine what role or position you will have at a bank. But compliance is a common one, FO work is common but you could also be in the legal department. Nothing can be 100% certain where you would end up in, some banks will let you choose where you want to be and train you up for it..... some will see stream you in based upon what you already have.

    As a rule you should take it that your degree only earns you an interview........... and probably only for your 1st job after qualification
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    The answer is "of course you can, don't be stupid." end of thread.
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    (Original post by asdfg0987)
    I've heard of people getting in IB after studying theology.
    Through watching the apprentice :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by epc)
    Through watching the apprentice :rolleyes:
    ha! no, never really watched the program.
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    (Original post by epc)
    Through watching the apprentice :rolleyes:
    That dude worked in ops though right?
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    (Original post by The IC Guy)
    That dude worked in ops though right?
    He must have, i doubt he was a FO guy.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    Unfortunately mate, that is the way of the world.

    Whatever your degree, the university is more important.

    Now yes, I know you're never going to get a biology job ahead of a biology graduate if your English degree is from Oxford and his biology degree is from Edge Hill, but for non-specialist graduate jobs, the university takes precedence.

    The top universities take the top all round candidates, on the whole. Sure, you'll get some students with fantastic talent in certain subjects (mainly maths) at the top universities, but mostly they take the the best of the best who are well-rounded people.

    In essence, the university has done the pre-screening that the employers would do. They don't need your entire CV to know you're good at this that and the other, you went to Oxford and studied XXX, you're damn good and they can easily see that.

    It's very unfair if you've picked a university for the course, rather than the prestige, but most people go for prestige>suitability anyways.

    tl;dr - for non-specialist grad jobs, university>degree
    Gah this simply isn't true and I wish people would stop saying it.

    The reason top firms go to top universities more for careers events etc then go on to employ more of their graduates is because they generally have the best graduates. However many of the best graduates go to less decent universities too for whatever reason: some can't afford to leave home, others are looking after sick relatives etc. If what you claimed were true then nobody would ever get a job in IB FO from Manchester, Leeds, Exeter, Nottingham or other universities like them because there are more than enough applicants from key targets (Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, imperial, UCL and Warwick) to fill all the places in IB in the UK. However applicants from these far less prestigious (but still awesome) universities still get FO IB jobs over applicants from key targets.

    Targets are targets because of a general trend in certain universities containing the best graduates, but firms know that many of the best graduates go to less prestigious semi-target or non-target universities too for whatever reasons. Therefore they allow everyone to apply regardless of university and degree and if your application is good enough, you do well in the tests and interview well then you can get a job in FO IB even if you go to Nottingham Trent or Edge Hill University. The fact is the overwhelming majority of graduates from these places simply aren't up to it, but at the same time if they apply and do well in the assessments then banks will have no reason not to employ them to work in FO.

    To the OP: a law degree is perfectly sufficient for getting into IB if you have the aptitude, it might even be an advantage because you can demonstrate a knowledge of lots of different areas. GS allows lawyers to become partners too, so you can do very well in IB firms by just pursuing a legal career too.
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    (Original post by Zweihander)
    All the top banks have target unis. Generally speaking, the top 6 unis. Consensus is the less prestigious the uni, the more relevant your degree needs to be. Which is why it's not an unusual sight to see History grads from Cambridge going into banking, but you'd be hard pressed to find a Histrory grad from Lancaster in a front office job.

    Law is fairly competitive at the targets so you'll have the pedigree, but you're going to to have to be really convincing when explaining why you want to go into IB in your cover letters and interviews (as opposed to Corporate Law, for example).



    Exit opps are more the rage in the US, culture in Europe is more so to stay in banking.

    Lots of hard science grads go into VC but your degree doesnt matter. Most good shops will want you to have been an analyst for at least two years at a bank before they'll take you on. Good deal experience and being able to show a genuine interest in Tech is what gets you into VC.
    If I am correct in assuming that the Top 6 unis in IB are Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, ICL, UCL and Warwick does this top 6 still apply for graduates of non-quantative courses. This question is regarding Warwick in particular. I am under the impression that a large part of the reason it is in the top 6 is because of the high quality of its maths, economics and engineering depts. However, with its qualitative courses this is not the case and Warwick's law school doesn't hold as much clout as the aforementioned departments and there is much that sets it apart from unis which are generally regarded as semi targets in IB like Bristol, Nottingham and Durham. The same could be said for other courses such as History or English where obviously there is likely to be a gulf between on Oxbridge grad and a Bristol one but not so much with Warwick.


    Basically what I am asking is, will a Warwick law grad be more highly regarded than a Nottingham one because they go to Warwick despite the fact that Nottingham has an equal and possibly better law school?
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    (Original post by invictus_veritas)
    Gah this simply isn't true and I wish people would stop saying it.

    The reason top firms go to top universities more for careers events etc then go on to employ more of their graduates is because they generally have the best graduates. However many of the best graduates go to less decent universities too for whatever reason: some can't afford to leave home, others are looking after sick relatives etc. If what you claimed were true then nobody would ever get a job in IB FO from Manchester, Leeds, Exeter, Nottingham or other universities like them because there are more than enough applicants from key targets (Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, imperial, UCL and Warwick) to fill all the places in IB in the UK. However applicants from these far less prestigious (but still awesome) universities still get FO IB jobs over applicants from key targets.

    Targets are targets because of a general trend in certain universities containing the best graduates, but firms know that many of the best graduates go to less prestigious semi-target or non-target universities too for whatever reasons. Therefore they allow everyone to apply regardless of university and degree and if your application is good enough, you do well in the tests and interview well then you can get a job in FO IB even if you go to Nottingham Trent or Edge Hill University. The fact is the overwhelming majority of graduates from these places simply aren't up to it, but at the same time if they apply and do well in the assessments then banks will have no reason not to employ them to work in FO.

    To the OP: a law degree is perfectly sufficient for getting into IB if you have the aptitude, it might even be an advantage because you can demonstrate a knowledge of lots of different areas. GS allows lawyers to become partners too, so you can do very well in IB firms by just pursuing a legal career too.
    This probably counts for an incredibly small percentage of graduates.
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    (Original post by Tha_Black_Shinobi)
    If I am correct in assuming that the Top 6 unis in IB are Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, ICL, UCL and Warwick does this top 6 still apply for graduates of non-quantative courses. This question is regarding Warwick in particular. I am under the impression that a large part of the reason it is in the top 6 is because of the high quality of its maths, economics and engineering depts. However, with its qualitative courses this is not the case and Warwick's law school doesn't hold as much clout as the aforementioned departments and there is much that sets it apart from unis which are generally regarded as semi targets in IB like Bristol, Nottingham and Durham. The same could be said for other courses such as History or English where obviously there is likely to be a gulf between on Oxbridge grad and a Bristol one but not so much with Warwick.
    :hello:

    So you interested in going into IB after you graduate?

    Basically what I am asking is, will a Warwick law grad be more highly regarded than a Nottingham one because they go to Warwick despite the fact that Nottingham has an equal and possibly better law school?
    Possibly better? Nahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. I'd say equal. Though you do raise a good point and I'm quite interested in the answer.
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    (Original post by Tha_Black_Shinobi)
    If I am correct in assuming that the Top 6 unis in IB are Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, ICL, UCL and Warwick does this top 6 still apply for graduates of non-quantative courses. This question is regarding Warwick in particular. I am under the impression that a large part of the reason it is in the top 6 is because of the high quality of its maths, economics and engineering depts. However, with its qualitative courses this is not the case and Warwick's law school doesn't hold as much clout as the aforementioned departments and there is much that sets it apart from unis which are generally regarded as semi targets in IB like Bristol, Nottingham and Durham. The same could be said for other courses such as History or English where obviously there is likely to be a gulf between on Oxbridge grad and a Bristol one but not so much with Warwick.


    Basically what I am asking is, will a Warwick law grad be more highly regarded than a Nottingham one because they go to Warwick despite the fact that Nottingham has an equal and possibly better law school?
    It depends. If they're applying for a law career then certainly not because law firms will know that Nottingham is slightly better than Warwick for law, although the marginal difference is such that it won't make a difference in applications.

    However if a law grad from both is applying for a general non-law related job, then Warwick students is still rated higher in general, however as I said this is only averages, so a better Nottingham law grad will still get in over a worse Warwick law grad, as they would over a worse Cambridge/ LSE/ Oxford Law grad. Also the standards of Warwick's courses are generally higher than the standards of Nottingham's courses. I know this for a fact because i know people who struggled at warwick and dropped out, then went to Nottingham and did the same course, which they found a lot easier. Even Warwick's language courses which have low entry requirements are on par with the best in the country. Basically Warwick is well-respected by employers because its courses are all of a very high standard and comparable with the level of the best undergraduate courses in these subjects in the world. This is true across the board for all of the major target universities and is not just on the strength of very exceptional maths/ economics/ engineering departments. That is why they are target universities.

    Hell I think this is wrong: I think the standards should be the same at all universities and if people can't cope with this then they should just fail, but ultimately that's the reason why these 6 are the target universities. Nevertheless employers appreciate that bright graduates come from elsewhere too and are willing to give them a fair chance.
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    (Original post by epc)
    He must have, i doubt he was a FO guy.
    No real banker would subject themselves to that degree of inanity, the show has very little to do with real business. Not to mention, you'll be earning the salary within a few years of starting and much more afterwards.

    (Original post by Tha_Black_Shinobi)
    If I am correct in assuming that the Top 6 unis in IB are Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, ICL, UCL and Warwick does this top 6 still apply for graduates of non-quantative courses. This question is regarding Warwick in particular. I am under the impression that a large part of the reason it is in the top 6 is because of the high quality of its maths, economics and engineering depts. However, with its qualitative courses this is not the case and Warwick's law school doesn't hold as much clout as the aforementioned departments and there is much that sets it apart from unis which are generally regarded as semi targets in IB like Bristol, Nottingham and Durham. The same could be said for other courses such as History or English where obviously there is likely to be a gulf between on Oxbridge grad and a Bristol one but not so much with Warwick.


    Basically what I am asking is, will a Warwick law grad be more highly regarded than a Nottingham one because they go to Warwick despite the fact that Nottingham has an equal and possibly better law school?
    From a bank's perspective, Maths, econ and finance is definitely what puts Warwick on the map but it's a lot more than those three courses that makes Warwick one of the best unis in the UK. I think invictus's point about the general standard at the targets pretty much sums up why they're the most highly regarded.

    In another thread they were arguing whether KCL's law department was superior to Warwick. I dont know, maybe it is, but put both CVs in front of a bank interviewer and assuming ceteris paribus he'll go for the Warwick one. As someone mentioned earlier banking is still very much a "same school tie" club, and on average 80% of FO grads will come from the Top 6 targets.
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    (Original post by Zweihander)
    No real banker would subject themselves to that degree of inanity, the show has very little to do with real business. Not to mention, you'll be earning the salary within a few years of starting and much more afterwards.
    Exactly, not to add that no real bank would ever give a person like him a FO job.

    Although he did tell Alan that he would add value.
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    (Original post by Doughnuts!!)
    Wait...you are joking, right?
    Oh I'm sorry! really really sorry for not knowing such an obvious thing!! but gotta love it when a person who's just a kid themselves acts like they know the whole world like the back of their hand. If I were you I would drop the attitude mister. Doesn't matter how great you think you are, it won't get you anywhere.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    ...and what do you base that on, good sir?

    Sociology at LSE is easier than Law at London Met, by your logic.

    So a law graduate from London Met must have a more valuable degree than the LSE sociology graduate?

    Wrong.
    And of course, you know this because you have so much experience in employing people and judging their degrees, added to the fact that you have studied both subjects at undergraduate level so you can easily comprehend their differences?
    It was an opinion for the love of god!! take it or leave it
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    (Original post by wherethebeaverlive)
    Oh I'm sorry! really really sorry for not knowing such an obvious thing!! but gotta love it when a person who's just a kid themselves acts like they know the whole world like the back of their hand. If I were you I would drop the attitude mister. Doesn't matter how great you think you are, it won't get you anywhere.
    But I don't act like I know everything. Otherwise I wouldn't have made this thread. :confused:
    The only reason I was asking is because I posted this in the Investment Banking forum and so I thought that it'd be a bit obvious what IB meant.
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    (Original post by wherethebeaverlive)
    And of course, you know this because you have so much experience in employing people and judging their degrees, added to the fact that you have studied both subjects at undergraduate level so you can easily comprehend their differences?
    It was an opinion for the love of god!! take it or leave it
    He left it.
 
 
 
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