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Christmas Dinner - A Size Zero Alternative? Watch

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    http://www.lmgtfy.com/?q=brussell+sprouts
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    (Original post by Nichrome)
    Half a sprout, boiled, with low fat spread. For pudding, ice cubes and some artificial sweetener.
    Mmm, Butterfield dietplan...
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    A bloody Mary.
    They're served with celery, right?
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Having been on the size zero diet for roughly 5 months and being very committed to this cause I am struggling to find a viable alternative of my usual routine for Christmas day. I obviously cannot find a milkshake in Roast dinner flavour, has anyone got any suggestions that abide my diet.
    And, out of interest, what does your size zero diet consist of on an average day?
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    (Original post by GildedButterfly)
    And, out of interest, what does your size zero diet consist of on an average day?
    Liquids.
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    You can always some low calorie man juice!
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    Anorexia isn't a joke.
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    (Original post by MelissaJayne)
    Anorexia isn't a joke.
    I was just about to say something like this. Though I'd have to add as a codicil, neither is it (in most cases) about size zero crap either.
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    (Original post by diamonddust)
    I was just about to say something like this. Though I'd have to add as a codicil, neither is it (in most cases) about size zero crap either.
    Couldn't agree more. Too many people think Anorexia is just a disease about not eating and being skinny, there's much more to it than that. It's a controlling, quite impossible condition. Ignorance is clearly the case among some people here though.
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    I agree with the latest point, being a male anorexic myself.

    Whereas I would probably speculate the topic itself to be something of a joke (although I apologise if I've wrongly judged that), the actual situation to an anorexic is no joke.

    Christmas day for me was really harrowing. I managed to fight through the intense anxieties I have on a daily basis to enjoy myself a little, but my body and mind fought it every step of the way. The disorder is a terrifyingly powerful one, and to endure it is no laughing matter.

    Christmas dinner should be enjoyed. ENJOYED. This is coming from an anorexic man here. There's no alternative to spending the day with the family feasting and enjoying one's self.
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    Ta-da!
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    (Original post by TotoMimo)
    I agree with the latest point, being a male anorexic myself.

    Whereas I would probably speculate the topic itself to be something of a joke (although I apologise if I've wrongly judged that), the actual situation to an anorexic is no joke.

    Christmas day for me was really harrowing. I managed to fight through the intense anxieties I have on a daily basis to enjoy myself a little, but my body and mind fought it every step of the way. The disorder is a terrifyingly powerful one, and to endure it is no laughing matter.

    Christmas dinner should be enjoyed. ENJOYED. This is coming from an anorexic man here. There's no alternative to spending the day with the family feasting and enjoying one's self.
    Well done on allowing yourself a little bit of enjoyment on Xmas day, a small victory in your battle against anorexia. But try to think, every dinner should be enjoyed. Not just Christmas dinner, try to allow yourself it more often. x
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    Thanks for the kind words MelissaJayne! But I really meant it, the topic creator clearly is in a very bad situation if this eating disorder has managed to grip them to the point of denying them Christmas dinner, of all things.

    Someone explained eating disorders to me in a really quite profound manner; instead of thinking of it as something inside you, it's actually more like a bubble around you. The real 'you', who loves a bit of cake and hates doing a trillion situps or purging food, that 'you' still exists within that bubble. The bubble, however, is the routine. The habit. Your shield from reality. And the sad thing is, as the bubble is a sphere, the reflection you see from the inside and the one you see on the outside differs quite dramatically; you'll only see a skewed representation of yourself, and those outside it see your deterioration with even more concerned eyes. It can't be popped from the outside, in fact, nothing from the outside can pass through; it's invincible. Your perfect defence. Your comfort blanket. But having nothing pass through, it's also suffocating you at the same time. It's a slow, and painful demise.

    Please, TC, think about what you're doing to yourself. Sometimes that 'bubble' reforms around me, but I know what I need to do to break free of it; please just try to break yours, even if it's periodically or temporarily...
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    (Original post by TotoMimo)
    Thanks for the kind words MelissaJayne! But I really meant it, the topic creator clearly is in a very bad situation if this eating disorder has managed to grip them to the point of denying them Christmas dinner, of all things.

    Someone explained eating disorders to me in a really quite profound manner; instead of thinking of it as something inside you, it's actually more like a bubble around you. The real 'you', who loves a bit of cake and hates doing a trillion situps or purging food, that 'you' still exists within that bubble. The bubble, however, is the routine. The habit. Your shield from reality. And the sad thing is, as the bubble is a sphere, the reflection you see from the inside and the one you see on the outside differs quite dramatically; you'll only see a skewed representation of yourself, and those outside it see your deterioration with even more concerned eyes. It can't be popped from the outside, in fact, nothing from the outside can pass through; it's invincible. Your perfect defence. Your comfort blanket. But having nothing pass through, it's also suffocating you at the same time. It's a slow, and painful demise.

    Please, TC, think about what you're doing to yourself. Sometimes that 'bubble' reforms around me, but I know what I need to do to break free of it; please just try to break yours, even if it's periodically or temporarily...
    I suffer from it to. And have never before heard something which has made quite so much sense. I've been in CBT for months but still I've never felt that kind of understand as that paragraph.
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    (Original post by MelissaJayne)
    Couldn't agree more. Too many people think Anorexia is just a disease about not eating and being skinny, there's much more to it than that. It's a controlling, quite impossible condition. Ignorance is clearly the case among some people here though.
    *nods* Tbh, I sort of wish anorexia was that simple. If it was a case of just wanting to be skinny, I would never have got it in the first place! Impossible is right, it's absolutely maddening! You can't explain it to people because you don't really know what's happening yourself. :hugs: Hope you're doing ok.

    (Original post by TotoMimo)
    I agree with the latest point, being a male anorexic myself.

    Whereas I would probably speculate the topic itself to be something of a joke (although I apologise if I've wrongly judged that), the actual situation to an anorexic is no joke.

    Christmas day for me was really harrowing. I managed to fight through the intense anxieties I have on a daily basis to enjoy myself a little, but my body and mind fought it every step of the way. The disorder is a terrifyingly powerful one, and to endure it is no laughing matter.

    Christmas dinner should be enjoyed. ENJOYED.
    This is coming from an anorexic man here. There's no alternative to spending the day with the family feasting and enjoying one's self.
    I totally agree with the bit in bold. I find non-sufferers tend to underestimate how hard it is to get through each day fighting. It tends to be seen as a case of 'just eat' and stop being so vain. Or worse, you get people like my mother pointing to themselves and going 'I'm fat, do you hate me?' People fail to understand it's a very... I don't know what word to use... inward? introspective? illness.

    Well done on managing to fight it on Christmas day! :hugs: Last Christmas was a total nightmare for me and I managed to actually sort of get through it this year but there were a lot of tears. And now the days after have been a bit crap, it's almost like my brain's given up on trying to maintain any idea of recovery. I still haven't got round to actually enjoying any sort of meal tbh, it's more of, like you said, an endurance. I tend to do the auto pilot thing I learned in hospital when I see a huge plate of food. Shut down, don't cry, try to breathe and close my eyes, concentrate on chewing and swallowing, don't taste a thing and eat it bite by bite until it's gone. The thought of someone joking- if it is a joke- about size zero and what to eat to maintain it on Christmas day really upsets me... mainly because size zero is not a normal adult size and shouldn't be aimed for and also because it's sad- if there's a time for eating lots without guilt, it's Christmas. It's also a tiny bit insulting if it is a joke. I've never wanted to be a size zero, it's absolutely grotesque.
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    (Original post by TotoMimo)
    Thanks for the kind words MelissaJayne! But I really meant it, the topic creator clearly is in a very bad situation if this eating disorder has managed to grip them to the point of denying them Christmas dinner, of all things.

    Someone explained eating disorders to me in a really quite profound manner; instead of thinking of it as something inside you, it's actually more like a bubble around you. The real 'you', who loves a bit of cake and hates doing a trillion situps or purging food, that 'you' still exists within that bubble. The bubble, however, is the routine. The habit. Your shield from reality. And the sad thing is, as the bubble is a sphere, the reflection you see from the inside and the one you see on the outside differs quite dramatically; you'll only see a skewed representation of yourself, and those outside it see your deterioration with even more concerned eyes. It can't be popped from the outside, in fact, nothing from the outside can pass through; it's invincible. Your perfect defence. Your comfort blanket. But having nothing pass through, it's also suffocating you at the same time. It's a slow, and painful demise.

    Please, TC, think about what you're doing to yourself. Sometimes that 'bubble' reforms around me, but I know what I need to do to break free of it; please just try to break yours, even if it's periodically or temporarily...
    ****. That's exactly it. Wow. And sometimes you miss the bubble and you forget how suffocating it is until you're in it again.
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    (Original post by diamonddust)
    ****. That's exactly it. Wow. And sometimes you miss the bubble and you forget how suffocating it is until you're in it again.
    Feel free to message me at anytime. About anything or everything. Even if just to rant. x
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    (Original post by MelissaJayne)
    Feel free to message me at anytime. About anything or everything. Even if just to rant. x
    Thanks hun and ditto xx
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    Count me in too. Sometimes a male perspective can help with these issues, because the social stigma attached to what these eating/living disorders are can often pigeonhole us quite unfairly, and people seem to forget that men suffer from these issues too.

    Once again, stressing that it's NOT all about just being skinny. If it was, we'd be easily curable.

    The topic creator has some real underlying emotional/psychological issues and by talking to myself, Melissa or Diamond, hopefully you can get the support you need.
 
 
 
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