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    (Original post by YhA_kaede)
    Same question for me last month and I chose to apply for Durham n Bristol, but not York.

    I am not sure if Durham or Bristol is better but they both seem better than York from the view of international student(ok, I mean Hong Kong)
    I see Durham and Bristol as equivalent (I applied for both), both have a slight edge on York, although York is still an excellent choice and has one of the best institutes for Health Economics in the country.

    "May I ask if u mean u can do module from the Msc course? Would u mind to tell me abit more abt it as it seems not an usual case for an BA to study any Msc module, many thanks for any details.

    PS: May I ask if there is any specific A-level requirement for any modules especially those more quantitative one?"

    Yes, in your third year you can chose to do Advanced Microeconomics and/or Advanced Macroeconomics, both are core MSc modules that undergrad finalists can do if they wish. There are about 10-15 undergrads taking Advanced Micro this year, I believe, and about double that number doing Advanced Macro. It's a tough course, as you would expect, but it's taught exceptionally well, and it's very interesting!

    And no, there are no extra A level requirements for any modules, although second and third year modules may be contingent on passing certain modules from the previous year.
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    mate the macro numbers defo arent that high. only about 15 too.
    I have to admit i did get a bit frustrated with the state of this because im only a 2.1 type of a student and found advanced macro outrageously difficult. however i wish to study macroeconomics at a higher level. One may say i should just try harder but after getting just below a first in second year macro I thought I would be able to cope with the work that third year macro brought. However I found myself spending countless hours trying to digest theory I just wasnt able to comprehend. Incidentally, around 30 undergrads started the module which has now dropped to about 15
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    (Original post by chidona)
    I see Durham and Bristol as equivalent (I applied for both), both have a slight edge on York, although York is still an excellent choice and has one of the best institutes for Health Economics in the country.

    "May I ask if u mean u can do module from the Msc course? Would u mind to tell me abit more abt it as it seems not an usual case for an BA to study any Msc module, many thanks for any details.

    PS: May I ask if there is any specific A-level requirement for any modules especially those more quantitative one?"

    Yes, in your third year you can chose to do Advanced Microeconomics and/or Advanced Macroeconomics, both are core MSc modules that undergrad finalists can do if they wish. There are about 10-15 undergrads taking Advanced Micro this year, I believe, and about double that number doing Advanced Macro. It's a tough course, as you would expect, but it's taught exceptionally well, and it's very interesting!

    And no, there are no extra A level requirements for any modules, although second and third year modules may be contingent on passing certain modules from the previous year.
    After I searched about the Msc degree, I found that most of the modules you learn in year 3 are actually modules from Msc too, is it right?:rolleyes:

    Btw, do u know if there will be ECON3281: BEHAVIOURAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ECONOMICS next year as I am really interest in it (hope to pursue in the Msc module :Behavioural Finance and Economics if I can)
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    (Original post by YhA_kaede)
    After I searched about the Msc degree, I found that most of the modules you learn in year 3 are actually modules from Msc too, is it right?:rolleyes:
    MSc students /can/ do some third year modules, but not many do. There's about 3/4 per third year module; there are about 150 MSc students doing Advanced Micro/Macro, however, which should tell you all you need to know.

    Think of it in this way: As a third year I /could/ do second year modules, but chose to do modules of my own level. As an MSc student you /could/ do third year finalist undergrad modules, but many don't; there's a good reason why our Business School performs consistently well for such a small university.

    Btw, do u know if there will be ECON3281: BEHAVIOURAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ECONOMICS next year as I am really interest in it (hope to pursue in the Msc module :Behavioural Finance and Economics if I can)
    It wasn't available this year, I think it was because the head lecturer was on research leave. I couldn't say whether it will be available next year or not, probably better to get in direct contact with the department.
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    is there a big difference between business economics and just economics??
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    (Original post by zanahoria)
    is there a big difference between business economics and just economics??
    Not really, business econ has more compulsory modules (so less choice), but you could take all those modules in the standard economics degree anyway.

    http://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/facul...works/l100.pdf

    http://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/facul...works/l112.pdf
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    (Original post by YhA_kaede)
    Why Durham is not a good option for a MSC then? Is there any reason for it?
    The person who stated that if you want to go to Durham for employment than its world class (top 25 in the world actually if rankings are to go by). Surely the whole point in studying economics is to go into a top job? If not, im sure u wont be disadvantaged when selecting for a masters course.
 
 
 
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