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I have a First Class Degree in Physics, what do I do next? Watch

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    Possibly email the institution of physics and explain your situation and see if they can find a specialised that meets your requirements.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Woah, woah, woah - really?

    What about universities like Harvard and Princeton and that?

    :eek:
    Well, those aren't in the space sector are they, they're universities..
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    (Original post by Mithra)
    Fairly irrelevant fact but only Americans can work in the space sector in the USA, even private companies can't hire foreigners. :dontknow:
    Pretty sure that isnt true - this guy worked for nasa and he is korean.
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    Do a postgrad - working sucks!

    But seriously, what could be better than sitting around all day thinking about the things you are interested in and not having to sign on?
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    If you get a PhD you'd bum your way in finance. Or just as is
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      (Original post by hoffman11)
      I have never known what to do with my life.

      I am 24 and have a 1:1 BSc in Physics, but am stumped as to which direction to take. I chose the subject due to interest but also due to lack of direction, as I was aware the Degree can be valued in varible situations. I am not largely motivated by money.

      I am more than competent socially, but am a geek at heart, and since finishing Uni I have regressed to working part time and spending the remainder practising advanced mathematics. I do have a keen interest in sound physics, but most jobs in that sector tend to be allocated on a 'who you know' rather than a 'what you know basis'.

      Not quite sure what to expect in terms of a reply to this ambigous question, but it feels better just writing it down.

      Wrong, most jobs in this sector require postgraduates studies. If you don't want to study further then you can apply for jobs in consultancy/management/banking.
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      Teaching is a viable option, just need to get a PGCE I think
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      (Original post by obbsidian)
      Pretty sure that isnt true - this guy worked for nasa and he is korean.
      I think they probably make exceptions for those they hand-pick. Also he worked there like 40 years ago, rules could have changed since then :p:.

      http://www.spacex.com/careers.php
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        (Original post by Mithra)
        Fairly irrelevant fact but only Americans can work in the space sector in the USA, even private companies can't hire foreigners. :dontknow:
        He doesn't need to go that far, we have the European Space Agency (ESA) but as I said in my previous post you can't make it make in there without postgraduate studies.
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        banker?
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        which uni did you get your degree from?
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        I thought/had always been given the impression that a physics degree was a highly sought after degree by employers, and finding a job afterwards wouldnt be difficult
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        (Original post by bloomblaze)
        I thought/had always been given the impression that a physics degree was a highly sought after degree by employers, and finding a job afterwards wouldnt be difficult
        It is, it's just there's not a lot of jobs that you can go into that are directly related to physics. It's great degree to have but unless you do a phd you'll probably never do it again after you've left uni. Unless you go into teaching physics.

        Op do whatever you want. I know guy with a first in physics, he got it last year. Now he's a trainee analyst for morgan and stanley.
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        A degree in physics?

        If what admissions tutors told me was correct then "anything/everything"
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        (Original post by Attlee_party)
        It is, it's just there's not a lot of jobs that you can go into that are directly related to physics. It's great degree to have but unless you do a phd you'll probably never do it again after you've left uni. Unless you go into teaching physics.

        Op do whatever you want. I know guy with a first in physics, he got it last year. Now he's a trainee analyst for morgan and stanley.
        i would be put off doing a physics degree because of the fact that so many physics graduates seem to go into finance and never use the physics knowledge again.

        unless im mistaken, there are very very few jobs out there which require a degree in physics 9except being a physics teacher)
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        I'll be beginning my physics degree next year in september and I'm worried i'll be in the same position as the OP when I graduate.
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        oil up and have a toss for all that time you've missed out on some pussy
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        (Original post by bloomblaze)
        i would be put off doing a physics degree because of the fact that so many physics graduates seem to go into finance and never use the physics knowledge again.

        unless im mistaken, there are very very few jobs out there which require a degree in physics 9except being a physics teacher)
        Well yeah pretty much, so it's either do phd or never do physics again really. Although getting a job is pretty easy, because the degree is very versatile.

        I'm going to do physics next year knowing that if i only do a honours I'll probably end up in a totally unrelated job. But the prospect of learing physics for those years is worth it in my opinion.
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        (Original post by hoffman11)
        I have never known what to do with my life.

        I am 24 and have a 1:1 BSc in Physics, but am stumped as to which direction to take. I chose the subject due to interest but also due to lack of direction, as I was aware the Degree can be valued in varible situations. I am not largely motivated by money.

        I am more than competent socially, but am a geek at heart, and since finishing Uni I have regressed to working part time and spending the remainder practising advanced mathematics. I do have a keen interest in sound physics, but most jobs in that sector tend to be allocated on a 'who you know' rather than a 'what you know basis'.

        Not quite sure what to expect in terms of a reply to this ambigous question, but it feels better just writing it down.

        If you have a physics degree what are you asking us for..
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        (Original post by Attlee_party)
        Well yeah pretty much, so it's either do phd or never do physics again really. Although getting a job is pretty easy, because the degree is very versatile.

        I'm going to do physics next year knowing that if i only do a honours I'll probably end up in a totally unrelated job. But the prospect of learing physics for those years is worth it in my opinion.
        from what ive read, a vocational degree like engineering or computer science would yield greater employment opportunities upon graduation than physics.

        it puzzles me how anyone could study physics at uni and then wholeheartedly work in, say the financial sector where theyd never use your physics knowledge again, especially considering that physics is such a demanding degree

        if i did a degree in physics, id want to end up working in a physics related area, if i wanted to work in finance, id have studied something finance related at uni

        its just a pity there are so few jobs which actually NEED a physics degree
       
       
       
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