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    I'm just loving the clash of your username with the Biology related thread Natural Sciences was the thing that first leapt out at me, too. Maybe try applying for that?
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    Obviously this varies between universities - but there is typically not a great deal of human biology in a general biology degree (compared to say a biomedical degree) - the emphasis is on ecology, zoology, maybe plant biology, cell biology, evolution etc. Look into individual module descriptions on university websites to get an idea of how you'll be straying from what you find interesting.
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    (Original post by BioSam)
    Obviously this varies between universities - but there is typically not a great deal of human biology in a general biology degree (compared to say a biomedical degree) - the emphasis is on ecology, zoology, maybe plant biology, cell biology, evolution etc. Look into individual module descriptions on university websites to get an idea of how you'll be straying from what you find interesting.
    Well thats reassuring. Also, I have begun to look at modul content in some unis and I do think I would enjoy both a Biology or Zoology degree.
    However, Now I have to decide if I really dont want to take the Physics and Maths rout.
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    I'm going on to do a degree in Ecology which is classed as a biological science, however I struggle with the majority of biology (all apart from the ecology, conservation and biodiversity section) and even managed to fail one of my AS exams. From what you are thinking of studying there will be many things which you do not like in Biology which you will not study. Try to choose a degree which leaves out what you don't want to do. I applied to Bournemouth and then after they published the course content which includes cells. Needless to say I now do not want to go there as I cannot do cells and that was the paper I failed. Look at the course content thats probably the best you can do. Even with my lack of ability in biology I've had offers from all of my Unis.
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    That is another degree I looked into. Fortunately UCL have just introduced it (Cambridge I think would be a little optimistic). Theres a great selection of modules aswell.
    But looking at their website I could do a first year in Biological sciences and then in my second year follow a zoology rout and end with a degree in zoology.

    Would you happen to know if you could do a mix of physical and biological modules in a Natural sciences degree?
    Well I am not particularly knowledgeable about natural sciences degrees, the only one I have looked into in any detail is durham's because I have applied for it.

    But in this case then yes: http://www.dur.ac.uk/natural.science...sci-biol-phys/ as long as you have the relevant a levels, I'd have a look around the site and see if you can work out whether it would be flexible enough, you dont have to do a joint degree like the one I posted.
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    (Original post by sam1am)
    Well I am not particularly knowledgeable about natural sciences degrees, the only one I have looked into in any detail is durham's because I have applied for it.

    But in this case then yes: http://www.dur.ac.uk/natural.science...sci-biol-phys/ as long as you have the relevant a levels, I'd have a look around the site and see if you can work out whether it would be flexible enough, you dont have to do a joint degree like the one I posted.
    Thanks for the link, that looks intresting, and would possibly be perfect however the biology section is structured about cell biology! The path I was trying to avoid.
    Im meeting with an Imperial physicist due to them knowing my parents. Hopefully this will allow me to decide if I really do not want to persue physics. Then it will be Biology/Zoology all the way
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    You could be involved in Biology with a maths degree, especially if you add to it with a masters in statistical or quantitative biology. It would only really exclude you from the areas of biology that you've stated you're largely disinterested in.
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    Thanks for the link, that looks intresting, and would possibly be perfect however the biology section is structured about cell biology! The path I was trying to avoid.
    Im meeting with an Imperial physicist due to them knowing my parents. Hopefully this will allow me to decide if I really do not want to persue physics. Then it will be Biology/Zoology all the way
    Ever heard of Francis Crick?

    He did a physics BSc at UCL.
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    Thanks for the link, that looks intresting, and would possibly be perfect however the biology section is structured about cell biology! The path I was trying to avoid.
    Im meeting with an Imperial physicist due to them knowing my parents. Hopefully this will allow me to decide if I really do not want to persue physics. Then it will be Biology/Zoology all the way
    Your name says you love physics? So perhaps that is the way to go. Or, if you are good at maths, actuarial science which pays well as a career because so few people do it. If you don't like biology A level then I think its a bit risky going for a biology degree.
    It is important to do what you enjoy at university because you will not only spend a lot of time doing it but you are going to get into significant debt to pay for the privilege.
    There are other degrees like engineering, govt and planning, materials science, materials and management etc you could do.
    Further education in health related fields, not involving pure biology, leading to good careers, might be health based qualifications such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, radiotherapy optometry etc all of which lead to good jobs and a career structure and you could get an NHS bursary for some of these.
    Then there are all the management degrees
    It is worth looking at the website or getting the paper prospectus of a university you like the look of and literally flicking through all the courses offered to see what you might like. Or there is the penguin careers book which will be in your local library.
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    Ok, keeping this short.

    Im considering a career in Zoology, Entomology (Insects) or Marine Biology. I find these subject areas fascinating and the idea of studying them.

    THE BIG BUT(s); I find alot of the biology at A level (and quite probably at degree level), dull. Many topics, such as infection, the human body, etc.
    I do not like the idea of straying too far from maths. I would want maths to play a role in what I study.


    AS Subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths, Further Maths.

    I forget my question, or if I even have one. Im just looking for arguments for a degree in Biology, Or against it, considoring my doubts.
    why not go for a degree in marine biology? at some unis you get to go on really cool field trips to awesome places and you can get years out researching cool things. my cousin did a zoology degree and she's now living her life's dream travelling and working in south africa. but there aren't very good career prospects in that field...
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    (Original post by Llamageddon)
    You could be involved in Biology with a maths degree, especially if you add to it with a masters in statistical or quantitative biology. It would only really exclude you from the areas of biology that you've stated you're largely disinterested in.
    That is true. But then again statistics isnt the most appealing furture to be frank (despite chosing to do S2 over D1) but yes this is the second time quantative Biology has been suggested so I think Iwill have to really considor doing it.
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    Look at the modules you'll have to do/the ones you get to pick.
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    (Original post by ollie82)
    why not go for a degree in marine biology? at some unis you get to go on really cool field trips to awesome places and you can get years out researching cool things. my cousin did a zoology degree and she's now living her life's dream travelling and working in south africa. but there aren't very good career prospects in that field...
    I have seriously considered marine biology. However I cant find a uni that I like that offers it! And thats another concern that I didnt mention in the OP, job prospects. Id feel more confident about finding a job after ding a Physics degree, even if it was away from the field of Physics
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    I have seriously considered marine biology. However I cant find a uni that I like that offers it! And thats another concern that I didnt mention in the OP, job prospects. Id feel more confident about finding a job after ding a Physics degree, even if it was away from the field of Physics
    they offer marine bio at aberdeen, aberystwyth, st andrews, bangor, hull, newcastle and plymouth i think.

    have you tried doing the stamford test online?
    or this: http://search.ucas.com/cgi-bin/hsrun...wordSearch.run
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    STAMFORD TEST:

    https://update.ucas.co.uk/cgi-bin/hs...nalDetails.run
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    (Original post by ollie82)
    they offer marine bio at aberdeen, aberystwyth, st andrews, bangor, hull, newcastle and plymouth i think.

    have you tried doing the stamford test online?
    or this: http://search.ucas.com/cgi-bin/hsrun...wordSearch.run
    Well thats what I ment by I havnt seen any Unis that I like offer it. Im yet to find a well respected uni that offers it, which is irritating
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    I have seriously considered marine biology. However I cant find a uni that I like that offers it! And thats another concern that I didnt mention in the OP, job prospects. Id feel more confident about finding a job after ding a Physics degree, even if it was away from the field of Physics
    I'm a research scientist (developmental biology) and I love Biology. However, it is widely considered a "soft science". (Generally people seem to think if you had any brains, you would have studied Chemistry, Physics or Maths instead.) If you do not stay in research or go into teaching, you will have much better job and salary prospects with Maths, Physics or Chemistry. (If you do stay in research, you will have a **** salary no matter what and very insecure career progression.)

    I love Biology and think it is the most interesting science and research field, but I really regret not studying Physics, because I think that would not only have been the most useful (in terms of transferable skills), but also the safest in case I have to look for a job outside research or teaching.

    I did not have the option of Natural Sciences in my country or I would have studied that. If I were you I would try to find a course where you can mix Maths, Physics and those Biology modules that interest you.
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    natsci looks a fantastic degree programme - cambridge, notts, brum, soton, durham, bath all do it. (and others I assume)

    if medicine didn't exist I would probably do that.
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    (Original post by llys)
    I'm a research scientist (developmental biology) and I love Biology. However, it is widely considered a "soft science". (Generally people seem to think if you had any brains, you would have studied Chemistry, Physics or Maths instead.) If you do not stay in research or go into teaching, you will have much better job and salary prospects with Maths, Physics or Chemistry. (If you do stay in research, you will have a **** salary no matter what and very insecure career progression.)

    I love Biology and think it is the most interesting science and research field, but I really regret not studying Physics, because I think that would not only have been the most useful (in terms of transferable skills), but also the safest in case I have to look for a job outside research or teaching.

    I did not have the option of Natural Sciences in my country or I would have studied that. If I were you I would try to find a course where you can mix Maths, Physics and those Biology modules that interest you.
    Well im certainly not money driven, but the prospect of findung no job at the end of my degree is occuring to me now.

    I understand by what you mean when you say it isnt look upon as the most difficult science, however surly there is the need for biology students (outside of Medicine)?

    Ahh, I just dont know!! Even if I did chose NatSci, I would still have to, at some point chose which path to take!
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    (Original post by Organ)
    natsci looks a fantastic degree programme - cambridge, notts, brum, soton, durham, bath all do it. (and others I assume)

    if medicine didn't exist I would probably do that.
    Yep, and UCL! So If I chose to do it I would have a range of places to appy to.
 
 
 
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