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    (Original post by ElectronicPanda)
    !:zomg:!
    wait, so do different genres in music do different shapes/colours? what type of sounds have what kind of shapes?

    it's so intriguing... :beard:

    ......is there a way to induce synesthesia? :teehee:
    LSD?
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    Nope I don't have it, but I think it would be very interesting to have.
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    (Original post by kerily)
    I have both Asperger's and mild synaesthesia, and I suspect that the two are related. When I hear music, I get the feeling of being touched, and see patterns at the same time. I also think in geometric patterns, not in words (think Kandinksy's 1920s period) and have to translate from how I think whenever I want to say anything.
    The two are very unlikely to be releated.

    Synesthesia is alot more common than they thought it was. Quite a bit of research is being done now...I think eventually they will find that nearly everyone has it, and the oddity will come from people who don't 'have' it.
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    (Original post by refref)
    The two are very unlikely to be releated.

    Synesthesia is alot more common than they thought it was. Quite a bit of research is being done now...I think eventually they will find that nearly everyone has it, and the oddity will come from people who don't 'have' it.
    Considering that Asperger's is basically your brain working in a very different way to others', I would imagine that the two aren't entirely unrelated - I'm not saying that everyone with synaesthesia has AS, for example, but I feel that my hypersensitivity to sound comes from the fact that sound for me also means vision and touch, and so I get triple the sensory overload that a non-synaesthesic person would get, which reinforces my asperger traits.

    I don't think that everyone would qualify for a medical diagnosis of synaesthesia at all. Yes, I imagine a lot of people associate colours with sounds or whatever, but there's a big difference between thinking 'ooh, this music sounds a bit blue' and actually having blue polygons appear in front of you whenever you hear a certain piece.
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    yes i have it graphemically and strong.
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    Yea, it can be very common, but people need to realise there is a difference in perception between strong and weak synesthetes. Saying that, it is a bloody astonishing phenomenon. We covered it a lot in my third year at uni; one of the lecturers has it as a special research interest

    So jealous of everyone having it though, I'd love to meet someone that could tell me what my name tastes like!
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    (Original post by kerily)
    Considering that Asperger's is basically your brain working in a very different way to others',
    I don't think that everyone would qualify for a medical diagnosis of synaesthesia at all. Yes, I imagine a lot of people associate colours with sounds or whatever, but there's a big difference between thinking 'ooh, this music sounds a bit blue' and actually having blue polygons appear in front of you whenever you hear a certain piece.
    Synesthesia isn't the brain working in a different way, it's the brain working as it should be, all brains have a cross over of senses. Many blind people have trained their visual and sound senses to interact, they can see the world around them by listening to sounds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_echolocation) , just like bats.

    At the moment it seems quite strange as not many studies have been done. Most synesthetes are unaware of their 'condition' and probably will never be aware of it, and they assume it's completely normal and everyone perceives colours as tastes, words as colours and numbers as patterns.
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    I've had it when I've been tripping.
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    What are the colours based on? it is consistent?

    For instance if you were to play a C note on a guitar and piano would it produce the same colour or perhaps similar shade?
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    I do - I see letters and numbers as having specific colours as well as days of the week and months of the year (usually related to the first letter of the word but not always).

    Didn't realise it wasn't 'normal' til I was about 10 when I said something so my mum about 'S' being purple, and she had no idea what I was talking about, and didn't know it had a proper name til I was about 16.

    Honestly cannot imagine what people who don't have it (the colour-letter/number kind) see when they read a book or a newspaper etc, nor for that matter how people with the same kind of synaesthesia can see different colours to me, even though I know they do.

    Always interesting to hear about people with other types, though, as I think mine is the most boring/common type around.
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    Synesthesia is an important feature of Daniel Tammet's book on growing up with Asperger's, Born on a Blue Day


    http://books.google.fr/books?id=gGrB...page&q&f=false

    I have a friend with Aspergers who talks about it all the time, especially about the colour he hears in music.. and in people's voices. Fascinating!
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    (Original post by crazybored)
    I do - I see letters and numbers as having specific colours as well as days of the week and months of the year (usually related to the first letter of the word but not always).

    Didn't realise it wasn't 'normal' til I was about 10 when I said something so my mum about 'S' being purple, and she had no idea what I was talking about, and didn't know it had a proper name til I was about 16.

    Honestly cannot imagine what people who don't have it (the colour-letter/number kind) see when they read a book or a newspaper etc, nor for that matter how people with the same kind of synaesthesia can see different colours to me, even though I know they do.

    Always interesting to hear about people with other types, though, as I think mine is the most boring/common type around.
    I think this is really interesting, I found out about it recently and am now starting to look into it just out of interest. Can i ask, when you're reading, say the letter S, does it look purple when you are reading it on a page? I don't like i 'have' (i know probably not correct term) synesthesia, but I wonder if you can get 'mental' synesthesia. Because say when I tihnk of the word "wednesday" it feels like it should be orange, or the number 5, what feels like it should be bright, bold red.

    I know I'm a little late responding, well about 2 months, but oh wells
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    (Original post by Quackers93)
    I think this is really interesting, I found out about it recently and am now starting to look into it just out of interest. Can i ask, when you're reading, say the letter S, does it look purple when you are reading it on a page? I don't like i 'have' (i know probably not correct term) synesthesia, but I wonder if you can get 'mental' synesthesia. Because say when I tihnk of the word "wednesday" it feels like it should be orange, or the number 5, what feels like it should be bright, bold red.

    I know I'm a little late responding, well about 2 months, but oh wells
    Hi,

    That sounds like synaesthesia to me! There's a whole bunch of different ways people experience it (and by it, I mean colour-letter/number/word synaesthesia, cos there's a whole load more types) - some actually see the letter/number etc as a particular colour, some get a sense of it, some see the colour floating above the letters etc etc

    I, for one, would probably describe mine as having a sense of the colour but a really really strong one - I can see that what I'm typing now is black but I can also "see" the other colours the letters are supposed to be - it's hard to describe!

    The one thing I would say "defines" this type of synaesthesia (and this is just my opinion) is that the colours you associate with letters etc never ever change; they're pretty much hardwired into your brain...

    Hope that makes some kind of sense!
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    (Original post by crazybored)
    Hi,

    That sounds like synaesthesia to me! There's a whole bunch of different ways people experience it (and by it, I mean colour-letter/number/word synaesthesia, cos there's a whole load more types) - some actually see the letter/number etc as a particular colour, some get a sense of it, some see the colour floating above the letters etc etc

    I, for one, would probably describe mine as having a sense of the colour but a really really strong one - I can see that what I'm typing now is black but I can also "see" the other colours the letters are supposed to be - it's hard to describe!

    The one thing I would say "defines" this type of synaesthesia (and this is just my opinion) is that the colours you associate with letters etc never ever change; they're pretty much hardwired into your brain...

    Hope that makes some kind of sense!
    Ah, right, cool I did a little online synaesthesia test yesterday just to see what it'd come out with and I think it might be a little. It does make sense - to me anyways Definatly going to look into it more
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    I have spatial sequence synesthesia, which means I can see time. Right now, I'm near to the top right hand corner of the year, with summer below me and past years and decades trailing off to my left.

    I also have colour synesthesia which isn't as strong. Different places have a different sense of colour and light, for example, which kind of influenced my uni choices

    It's interesting to hear about other people's synesthesia- it's rare to find someone else who has it in real life.
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    (Original post by Quackers93)
    Ah, right, cool I did a little online synaesthesia test yesterday just to see what it'd come out with and I think it might be a little. It does make sense - to me anyways Definatly going to look into it more
    http://www.synesthete.org/

    Not sure which one you found but the above is one of the more accurate kinds of tests - I did it to make sure I was eligible to take part in the synaesthesia research at Uni (the 'how quickly can you spot a triangle of 2's in a sea of 5's' kinds of tests are a bit rubbish IMO)

    (Original post by Kallistrate)
    I have spatial sequence synesthesia, which means I can see time. Right now, I'm near to the top right hand corner of the year, with summer below me and past years and decades trailing off to my left.
    That sounds so interesting! I'm fascinated by other kinds (they tend to be more interested to be honest!)
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    I have orgasm synesthesia, which is pretty rare. Basically, I see colours and shapes when I orgasm. Quite interesting in a way, but I wish I just had normal synesthesia and could see music and the like.
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    (Original post by crazybored)
    http://www.synesthete.org/

    Not sure which one you found but the above is one of the more accurate kinds of tests - I did it to make sure I was eligible to take part in the synaesthesia research at Uni (the 'how quickly can you spot a triangle of 2's in a sea of 5's' kinds of tests are a bit rubbish IMO)
    Yeah, thats the one I went on Think I got 0.32 and 0.55 for weekdays and months which I think it says is considered synesthetic and 1.14 for letters and numbers which is less so I wonder how they analyse it :rolleyes:
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    Yeah I have this. I didn't really think anything of it until I watched a video on YouTube about Daniel Tammet (aspergic savant who also has synaesthesia) and found out there was a name for it. I experience very vivid mental imagery when I listen to certain types of music and I see the days of the week and the months of the year as shapes. I associate letter patterns with moods as well. It's very weird .
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    (Original post by lolawonder)
    Just wondering if any fellow TSR people have this 'condition'?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia

    I have sound to colour synesthesia, which means that when I hear music I see colours and shapes in my head, according to the pitch and timbre of the sound. It's very psychedelic!

    I've never spoke to anyone else with this condition, but I've done quite a bit of research into it. It's very interesting Does anyone else have any forms of it?
    I have the sound - colour synesthesia too..(it's not so strong though)
    AND I also have
    Colour-Number Synesthesia

    For years I thought everyone saw numbers and letters in colour, but as I got older and talked about it to other people, I found that it only seemed to be me.

    I tried to ignore it because it started to take over my life. For instance, I would always leave things “On” because the word “On” portrayed a light-yellow color and the word “Off” was black and I didn’t like that because it gave me a negative feeling which made me uncomfortable.

    Also, I perceive letters and numbers to have a negative & positive feel because of the colour the are. For example, I don’t like the letter “T” because it is a dark nasty green and as a result is negative.

    It’s odd because I see the world the same way you do. I know I am typing in black but each letter projects a certain color which projects a certain feeling. This is the same with numbers....
 
 
 
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