Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

How will having a mild-moderate stutter affect my future? Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I have a mild stutter and it has no affect on my life at all.

    I had an interview in which it happened a fair amount, and I just smiled/laughed, apologised, told them that i was nervous, took a deep breath and carried on. I got the job! Granted it wasn't a law job, but it did involve talking to people/using the phone.

    Just make sure you smile when it happens. If you start to look as awkward and uncomfortable as you sound - you're going to make them feel uncomfortable, thus they're less likely to pick you.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mapulet)
    Do not listen to anyone telling you to 'get rid of your stutter' !

    I have a stammer and have stammered for years.

    People will tell you that there are cures, that you need to calm down, that you're stressed, that perhaps your breathing needs to change.

    The only way (and I say this from going to speech therapy since I was 11, I am now 18) is to accept that your stammer is part of who you are.

    There is nothing wrong with it. It's how you speak. If people can't be bothered waiting a few seconds extra to hear what you're trying to say, quite frankly they're not worth talking to.

    As well as this, it will NOT AFFECT YOUR FUTURE WHATSOEVER.
    This is a common misconception. I have applied for law this year (and have had several interviews) and the way I handled it was by telling them I have a stammer before the interview begun.

    I aim to be a barrister- the fact that I stammer will only stop me realising this if I let it.

    PM me if you like- anyone telling you to change it/hide it/that it will stop you is speaking out of what they percieve to be right, not the truth.

    Good luck

    thank u soo much for ur help, ur much more useful than mostly everyone else who made a comment, especially that douche silverbolt.

    thanks, and i do go to a speech therapist, its just that its not a gud one and its the only one in my area
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am in the exact same boat as you in the fact that I have a mild to moderate stutter and going to uni next year. I feel that confidence is the key, if you feel confide t then the stutter won't occur as much however I accept this is easier said than done. Nevertheless when you are talking just take some deep breaths and pause when you feel the stammer coming along. People are very tolerant today so it won't affect if you go for a job, if you have the qualifications you have the qualifications no two ways about that. In the meantime if you want to do something about your stammer there is a program called starfish which I went on, it's about £200 but it does help. I'll leave you with my personal tip: just don't think about it. I don't know about you but I find with me if I don't think about it it does not happen and in the event that it does I am calm enough to deal with it (this is where I pause take a breath and resume/start again. I hope this helps you :-)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GGSTRT)
    I am in the exact same boat as you in the fact that I have a mild to moderate stutter and going to uni next year. I feel that confidence is the key, if you feel confide t then the stutter won't occur as much however I accept this is easier said than done. Nevertheless when you are talking just take some deep breaths and pause when you feel the stammer coming along. People are very tolerant today so it won't affect if you go for a job, if you have the qualifications you have the qualifications no two ways about that. In the meantime if you want to do something about your stammer there is a program called starfish which I went on, it's about £200 but it does help. I'll leave you with my personal tip: just don't think about it. I don't know about you but I find with me if I don't think about it it does not happen and in the event that it does I am calm enough to deal with it (this is where I pause take a breath and resume/start again. I hope this helps you :-)
    thank u v. much for ur help.
    please tell me more about this program and if it is available outside of the uk (now i live in the middle east but will hopefilly go to a uni in canada (most prboly mcgill in montreal)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by --Butters--)
    thank u soo much for ur help, ur much more useful than mostly everyone else who made a comment, especially that douche silverbolt.

    thanks, and i do go to a speech therapist, its just that its not a gud one and its the only one in my area
    You're very welcome

    If you want me to pass on the information/support I get from the speech therapy in my area then I can do if you think that will help.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by --Butters--)
    thank u v. much for ur help.
    please tell me more about this program and if it is available outside of the uk (now i live in the middle east but will hopefilly go to a uni in canada (most prboly mcgill in montreal)
    Your welcome. I don't think they have it outside the uk however you can check. Go to any search engine and put in the starfish programme I think they have sine tips to help people on the website, if you do need anything please don't hesitate to ask me :-)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I have a mild stammer which comes and goes. It is usually worst on the phone, even if I'm talking to my nearest and dearest. I find that taking regular breaths, and a deep breath before a word that you have particular trouble with, usually helps.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by --Butters--)
    I will study business at undergrad, next year, and then hopefully do law at graduate level.

    But i have a stutter. Im doing really well in my studies but I just think that having this stutter will affect my future.

    For example, imagine if i have to give an interview, then i start stuttering and blocking. Why would the company take me? If i had to meet someone and i start stuttering, what will there first impression be?


    thanks
    Hi

    The most important thing to do when speaking is not to THINK about your stuttering and how others will perceive your stutter. I find speaking spontaneously will ease my stutter as opposed to something I have prepared for - like a business presentation. But, don't think about what you are GOING to say, just say it like spontaneously.

    Also, I went on this program for stutters - Go to your GP and explain your problem and he/she might refer you to the local speech therapist - and they make you do stuff like speaking reaaalllly slowly. Basically, you have to disfigure the words as much as possible ( I still have the sample video of how to do it). They also work on your confidence and breathing techniques such as taking a deep breath and slurring the first words. (I used to have difficulties with some letters such as B, D, J and a few others). But that really helped me.

    Another thing you could try is slowing down the last few letters (stretching them out) by speaking really slowly, a bit like slurring your words and carrying the last letter over to the next word so you don't lose your breath and have to start again by stuttering.

    I have noticed that by speaking in a different accents (I still have to perfect it) I stutter less. I can do an American, Scottish and a Yorkshire accent. Basically, this method is like "adopting the persona" (Putting yourself in someone else's shoes - what actors/actresses do in films/movies) of another person and styling your words so that it comes out easier.

    Hopefully, some of the "solutions" above will help you. I am also applying for undegrad next year (LAW) and I am nervous. I hardly pick up the phone so I avoid talking to my relatives although I can talk to them quite fluently in person.

    Anyways, when talking, have CONFIDENCE (like you know what you are talking about), always be jolly (talk as if you are happy all the time, even when you are not!) and NEVER think "Am I going to stammer this time?"

    If you don't understand anything, just PM me
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bishy786)
    Hi

    The most important thing to do when speaking is not to THINK about your stuttering and how others will perceive your stutter. I find speaking spontaneously will ease my stutter as opposed to something I have prepared for - like a business presentation. But, don't think about what you are GOING to say, just say it like spontaneously.

    Also, I went on this program for stutters - Go to your GP and explain your problem and he/she might refer you to the local speech therapist - and they make you do stuff like speaking reaaalllly slowly. Basically, you have to disfigure the words as much as possible ( I still have the sample video of how to do it). They also work on your confidence and breathing techniques such as taking a deep breath and slurring the first words. (I used to have difficulties with some letters such as B, D, J and a few others). But that really helped me.

    Another thing you could try is slowing down the last few letters (stretching them out) by speaking really slowly, a bit like slurring your words and carrying the last letter over to the next word so you don't lose your breath and have to start again by stuttering.

    I have noticed that by speaking in a different accents (I still have to perfect it) I stutter less. I can do an American, Scottish and a Yorkshire accent. Basically, this method is like "adopting the persona" (Putting yourself in someone else's shoes - what actors/actresses do in films/movies) of another person and styling your words so that it comes out easier.

    Hopefully, some of the "solutions" above will help you. I am also applying for undegrad next year (LAW) and I am nervous. I hardly pick up the phone so I avoid talking to my relatives although I can talk to them quite fluently in person.

    Anyways, when talking, have CONFIDENCE (like you know what you are talking about), always be jolly (talk as if you are happy all the time, even when you are not!) and NEVER think "Am I going to stammer this time?"

    If you don't understand anything, just PM me

    AMAZING, amazing help. thank u so much for all these tips. im sure they'll help me.
    thanks, good luck with law
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by --Butters--)
    I will study business at undergrad, next year, and then hopefully do law at graduate level.

    But i have a stutter. Im doing really well in my studies but I just think that having this stutter will affect my future.

    For example, imagine if i have to give an interview, then i start stuttering and blocking. Why would the company take me? If i had to meet someone and i start stuttering, what will there first impression be?


    thanks
    My mum has a moderate to severe stammer - She usually stammers once or twice every sentence. She's a senior manager at Vertex, she's doing extremely well for herself for someone who didn't go to college or university. Obviously, me, my brother, my dad and her close friends and family don't notice when she stammers exactly, but other people do alot, she has got some abuse for it - When she started working at BT they put her on a special needs programme, they thought her speech impediment meant she had learning difficulties, and someone once called her a drunk and asked to speak to her manager when she was answering calls, so you're gonna have to be prepared for setbacks.

    When she goes for an interview, she plans what she's going to say beforehand, thinks of questions they might ask and rehearses her answers. As soon as she goes in, she tells them she has a stammer and that she may stumble over some of her words because she's nervous, but that it doesn't impede on her performance as an employee.

    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    Well, if you have to ever give a presentation it will affect that unfortunately. There are ways to get rid of your stutter of course, lots of documentation available on the internet.
    Neither are necessarily true; my mum give a presentation to 2,000 when she worked at BT and managed very well. Also, there aren't ways to cure, or 'get rid of' a stammer - even if the person manages to train themselves not to tumble over their words, someone with a stammer will never be able to talk off the cuff like people without speech impediments do, It stays with you even if its mild.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    It will r-r-r-ruin it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    Oh god, here she goes again bulldozing her way through peoples posts.

    That's your opinion, which is of course subjective. People who give presentations that stutter are not as good as people without one.

    There are ways and methods to overcome your stutter, as aforementioned it is well documented on the internet. My friend had a stutter when she was younger, but she grew out of it through techniques and training.

    Also, you 'saying your mum did very well' at a presentation is your opinion, not fact.
    There is nothing wrong with having a stammer.

    Good communication is not just how quickly you manage to get words out- it's about many other things.

    I give presentations all the time, am confident, get my point across and yes, I stammer.

    I run the law society at my college, actively take part in my debating club, am applying (and have successfully attained offers for) law and have never been held back by difficulty in pronouncing a few syllabuls.

    'Techniques' and 'training' change how you talk- it becomes unnatural. You're right- I don't stammer if I take a breath before a word, or if I change what I'm going to say, or if I cough to get a word out.

    The fact is however i'd rather s-s-s-say a w-w-w-ord like this than -breaaaaath- say, -something else- *cough* instead!

    It's nothing to do with confidence, it does not affect your life and essentially, it is not a big deal. When people realise this, their stammer gets less severe
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    Oh god, here she goes again bulldozing her way through peoples posts.

    That's your opinion, which is of course subjective. People who give presentations that stutter are not as good as people without one.

    There are ways and methods to overcome your stutter, as aforementioned it is well documented on the internet. My friend had a stutter when she was younger, but she grew out of it through techniques and training.

    Also, you 'saying your mum did very well' at a presentation is your opinion, not fact.
    There was nothing even remotely bulldozer-ish about that post, I wasn't blunt or sarcastic or any of those things I usually am.

    You saying that a stammer 'will affect' his ability to give presentations - How very negative, when in actuality people who have stammers can give presentations confidently and come across just like anyone else. Which is what I meant by doing 'very well'.
    You then go on to completely contradict yourself by saying 'there are ways to get rid of your stutter, of course' Which is another thing that's inaccurate and for most people quite untrue.
    If you don't want people to contradict you, don't post things which you obviously don't know much about :dontknow:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Boobies.)
    There was nothing even remotely bulldozer-ish about that post, I wasn't blunt or sarcastic or any of those things I usually am.

    You saying that a stammer 'will affect' his ability to give presentations - How very negative, when in actuality people who have stammers can give presentations confidently and come across just like anyone else. Which is what I meant by doing 'very well'.
    You then go on to completely contradict yourself by saying 'there are ways to get rid of your stutter, of course' Which is another thing that's inaccurate and for most people quite untrue.
    If you don't want people to contradict you, don't post things which you obviously don't know much about :dontknow:
    This is good, accurate information (based on years of speech therapy/research).
    Well done for not conforming to the general stereotype that those with stammers cannot act confidently/perform as well as other people.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    How on earth am I contradicting myself? Wtf. Like I said before, I know a lot about it due to my friend that used to have it. You haven't really counter-argued against my previous post, more backed up what I previously said, and if the OP does look on the internet there are a variety of sources to confirm this.

    What you have done is in fact not contradicted me, but just babbled a lot of over-opinionated nonsense again. If you don't want to get 'contradicted', post facts like I said before.
    Your friend used to have a stammer?

    Oh good then, that makes you extremely knowledgable :')

    Yes, you can block out your stammer with techniques as has previously been said. But you can never change the fact that a stammer is just how you talk, and there is nothing wrong with that. No matter how much you do breathing techniques, pay £250 for a course on hiding it or 'become more confident' (note: confidence has nothing to do with actually having a stammer, it may however make it worse when you're stressed/nervous), if you have a stammer, you have a stammer.

    I can 'hide' my stammer if I choose to. It's called blocking. I used to do it all the time and then decided it wasn't worth all the extra stress and effort.

    There's nothing wrong with a stammer, it doesn't affect your life unless you choose to believe it's going to, and persuading the OP to go on a course to try and mask is is going to not only be expensive, but utterly pointless in the long run.

    I have a stammer, and I like it ;]
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mapulet)
    Your friend used to have a stammer?

    Oh good then, that makes you extremely knowledgable :')

    Yes, you can block out your stammer with techniques as has previously been said. But you can never change the fact that a stammer is just how you talk, and there is nothing wrong with that. No matter how much you do breathing techniques, pay £250 for a course on hiding it or 'become more confident' (note: confidence has nothing to do with actually having a stammer, it may however make it worse when you're stressed/nervous), if you have a stammer, you have a stammer.

    I can 'hide' my stammer if I choose to. It's called blocking. I used to do it all the time and then decided it wasn't worth all the extra stress and effort.

    There's nothing wrong with a stammer, it doesn't affect your life unless you choose to believe it's going to, and persuading the OP to go on a course to try and mask is is going to not only be expensive, but utterly pointless in the long run.

    I have a stammer, and I like it ;]
    Glad you agree
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Boobies)
    I talk rubbish
    Oh, and I'd also like to point out to 'Boobies' these FACTS

    Among preschoolers, the prognosis for recovery is good. Based on research, about 65% of preschoolers who stutter recover spontaneously in the first two years of stuttering, and about 74% recover by their early teens. In particular, girls seem to recover well. For others, early intervention is effective in helping the child achieve normal fluency.
    Once stuttering has become established, and the child has developed secondary behaviors, the prognosis is more guarded, and only 18% of children who stutter after five years recover spontaneously.


    This backs up my previous statement about my friend losing hers at a young age.

    References taken from:
    Guitar, Barry (2005). Stuttering: An Integrated Approach to Its Nature and Treatment. San Diego: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
    Kalinowski, JS; Saltuklaroglu, T (2006). Stuttering. San Diego: Plural Publishing.
    Ward, David (2006). Stuttering and Cluttering: Frameworks for understanding treatment. Hove and New York City: Psychology Press.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    Glad you agree
    I just don't understand why you're commenting on something you have no personal experience with/ have any useful information about.

    I know that's what people do on TSR, but about something that can seriously affect people's lives I think that's pretty low. If the OP feels like he has to go and change how he talks now, as opposed to accepting that it isn't a problem, you've both affected his/her confidence and cost them money.

    It's people like you that make people who stammer think they need to go on these ridiculous courses in the first place!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    Oh, and I'd also like to point out to 'Boobies' these FACTS

    Among preschoolers, the prognosis for recovery is good. Based on research, about 65% of preschoolers who stutter recover spontaneously in the first two years of stuttering, and about 74% recover by their early teens. In particular, girls seem to recover well. For others, early intervention is effective in helping the child achieve normal fluency.
    Once stuttering has become established, and the child has developed secondary behaviors, the prognosis is more guarded, and only 18% of children who stutter after five years recover spontaneously.


    This backs up my previous statement about my friend losing hers at a young age.

    References taken from:
    Guitar, Barry (2005). Stuttering: An Integrated Approach to Its Nature and Treatment. San Diego: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
    Kalinowski, JS; Saltuklaroglu, T (2006). Stuttering. San Diego: Plural Publishing.
    Ward, David (2006). Stuttering and Cluttering: Frameworks for understanding treatment. Hove and New York City: Psychology Press.
    Yes, you can grow out of your stammer.

    No one was saying that you can't. Nor were they saying you can't be 'cured' of it.

    The point is, is that there is no problem, so you do not need a cure.

    There is nothing wrong with having a stammer.

    (And in terms of the cures, they do make your speech more unnatural than a stammer ever would. Have a listen to Gareth Gates and how he breathes very forcefully before every word that he's struggling on.)

    It just causes more stress.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mapulet)
    I just don't understand why you're commenting on something you have no personal experience with/ have any useful information about.

    I know that's what people do on TSR, but about something that can seriously affect people's lives I think that's pretty low. If the OP feels like he has to go and change how he talks now, as opposed to accepting that it isn't a problem, you've both affected his/her confidence and cost them money.

    It's people like you that make people who stammer think they need to go on these ridiculous courses in the first place!
    Firstly, the OP asked for everyone's opinion by creating this thread, you're not a moderator and have no right to tell anyone else not to post just because you don't agree with it, that's life, you're not going to like all the flavours of it, get used to it.

    Actually, I have posted some useful information above if you care to look, which is based on fact, not speculated opinion like Boobies has done. I originally posted my opinion which can't be negated unfortunately for you , and I am well within my right to do so, please stop trying to dissuade me, or others from posting because I won't. I've seen many presentations from different people due to the sector I work in, hence my original post.

    This is about bringing together information that could help this guy, and when I try to help him by showing that there are things that can help him, I am accused of being negative!

    Lastly, I hardly think anyone' life has been affected by posts on this forum, never mind my posts on this thread, that would be worrying if true. I think you're being a bit over-dramatic about the whole thing and need to calm down.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: February 24, 2011
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources
    Bizarre things students have spent their loans onThings you should budget for at uni

    Sponsored features:

    Making money from your own website

    Need some cash?

    How to make money running your own website.

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.