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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Good question. The government essentially wanted to encourage the less academically able to go to university, so lesser degrees were introduced so that they'd have a chance to say that they'd at least been to university.
    OK, fair enough. But it is maybe a bit dim for the government to do that if the degrees won't be very useful anyway.
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    Thank you for all your advice, I'll try and put it into action!
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    Journalism... Honesty...? Please.
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    If that's the case, then why does it even exist in the first place?
    Journalism degrees can be useful in terms of gaining experience in the skills required, however the degree needs to be accredited for it to be of any real ''worth''. Also I think it's important to choose a Uni that will maximise the chances of you getting employed, I mean a London university will arguably give you more contacts and oppurtunities than some of the other unis, since most newspapers/magazines etc are based in London.

    Most employers prefer you to do traditional degrees because then you have a specific are you can go into, e.g politics, history. Then the common path is to gain as muh experience as possible at Uni and try for internships then speialise post grad. Of course there are other ways, but that seems to be the most common one. It's certainly the one I intend on taking, if I decide not to go to a London Uni I have deided to do a post grad there in journalism.
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    (Original post by Anabolicminds)
    do whatver u want and then a NCTJ journalism degree, its very interesting and hard subject

    Absolutely correct.

    I've met so many people who have completed a journalism degree and called it a waste of time. There are some people on my course now who are in that boat and are STILL doing an NCTJ. So yeah, follow Anabolicmind's advice :borat:
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    For what reason do they say this though? What's the point in the journalism and media degrees existing if they're "useless"?

    Because any media org worth its salt will train you in their particular style rendering your journalism degree as useless.

    They exist because there is a 'market' for these qualifications but most people who are journalists do not rate them. One editor I met even told me to my face journo school is a waste of time.
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    (Original post by unknown demon)
    Because any media org worth its salt will train you in their particular style rendering your journalism degree as useless.

    They exist because there is a 'market' for these qualifications but most people who are journalists do not rate them. One editor I met even told me to my face journo school is a waste of time.
    How about getting into journalism with no degree at all? Is it viable? Possible to get some work experience in a magazine/newspaper/weblog and work one's way up from a low position to a higher position?
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    How about getting into journalism with no degree at all? Is it viable? Possible to get some work experience in a magazine/newspaper/weblog and work one's way up from a low position to a higher position?
    This doesn't happen often nowadays but if it were to happen then you'll need very high level contacts think editor/deputy editor/lead writer.

    I'd say the best things to do are:

    1) Go to a top (or the best university you can get into) and study a traditional subject (arts/science/maths)
    2) Do as much student journalism as possible across several platforms (print, broadcast, social media, television etc and so forth)
    3) Build up contacts in the media, if you have none go and find them. There are so many inroads but it'll still be hard, you'll face countless rejections and have your time wasted or be completely ignored. However, networking is the best way in and usually in many cases the only way in.
    4) Have an online presence i.e. blog, twitter, bookmarks etc and so forth
    5) Pick a specialization i.e. a sub-field of journalism like politics, history, economics, business etc and so forth. Ordinary wannabe's in news journalism are 10 a penny. Do something to stand out.

    While I have been told by many senior people in media that a journo qualification is largely seen as a waste of time I'd make an exception if you go somewhere like Columbia/Stanford for J-School from what I've seen and friends I know attending/graduated/applying is you'll definitely end up with a job but its a very expensive route to take for an industry which isn't known for its remuneration.
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    Everyone's given great advice. I can only add: learn shorthand. I have quite a few friends who've gone on to do journalism and they've been learning shorthand. It'll help with taking notes in lectures aswell :p:
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    Read Nick Davies' Flat Earth News. It'll give you an idea of what to expect from the profession.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Not Oxford, by any chance? No, really? Didn't think so.
    What's Oxford got to do with anything?
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    Specialise - the best journalists know a lot about their subject, rather than a lot of stuff about journalism.
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    Having done an NCTJ certified course at the University of Central Lancashire I can highly recommend it. I graduated in 2009 and am now an Editor of a weekly magazine.

    My course included shorthand and it is useful, particularly in Newspapers they ask for it, but honestly I rarely use it on a day-to-day basis because dictophones are much easier and more reliable.

    The advice around here is great, DO start a blog, DO get as much relevant experience as you can (including student media) and most importantly be patient and don't give up! It took me and plenty of people I graduated with to get anywhere so you need to stick with it and do whatever you can for free.

    I'd say most important of all is to enjoy what you're doing, since Journalism isn't well paid you have to enjoy it. Good Luck
 
 
 
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