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    (Original post by TheRealDarthVader)
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    You have made this sound like something I will sign up for when I am mega rich and can afford to spend 3 more years at uni :teeth:

    Thanks for all the info, my brother is looking to get into coaching or something related and it may be of interest to him so I will direct him towards this thread at some point as it looks like an awesome course :top:
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    (Original post by Colbert)
    You have made this sound like something I will sign up for when I am mega rich and can afford to spend 3 more years at uni :teeth:

    Thanks for all the info, my brother is looking to get into coaching or something related and it may be of interest to him so I will direct him towards this thread at some point as it looks like an awesome course :top:

    If he wants to go into coaching I wouldn't reccomend a degree in football. As interesting as it is, only about 1/3 of the content is of any use to coaching. If I had known more about the course all those years ago, I would probably have gone for a degree in sports coaching or sport psychology, simply because they spend more time looking at the aspects affecting performance.

    To gain employment from coaching you do not need a degree, but simply the FA coaching certificates. They also run courses in psychology, fitness, and do more age appropriate courses so that you can focus your learning in a specific area.

    As for tactics, just play Football Manager
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    (Original post by TheRealDarthVader)
    We have to figure out why that is though. I don't like the thought that just because you are born with a vagina, you will never make lots of money from football.

    I totally and wholeheartedly agree with you that currently the standard is quite low, and there is very little aggression (something which, as a Blackburn fan, I have become quite accustomed to). Also, the goalkeepers are useless, but that is more than likely down to the fact that women, in general, are much shorter than men. A 5'4'' woman is defending an 8' tall and 24' wide goal. That leaves lots of space, which is why they score goals from anywhere.

    You believe that nothing will change, so why is that? Do you feel that women can never achieve the same level of football standard as men?
    Nothing/little will change because the public attitude won't change and it doesn't want to/need to change. Sports-inclined women don't always go for football first and foremost. It's a sport more prevalent amongst men, largely because it is a more masculine sport, a contact sport with plenty of aggression thrown in. This is why football doesn't appeal as much to women as it does to men. It isn't a particularly feminine game.

    Women will never achieve the same level of football standard as men. It's a contact sport, one with aggression. Womens football is very different to mens football, a very different form of football and for this reason it appeals to far fewer people. Watching a game of womens football feels more like watching a gentle and friendly kick-about in the local park - as a male speaking, it's lacking competitiveness and steel and for this reason, womens football is a turn-off.
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    (Original post by TheRealDarthVader)
    If he wants to go into coaching I wouldn't reccomend a degree in football. As interesting as it is, only about 1/3 of the content is of any use to coaching. If I had known more about the course all those years ago, I would probably have gone for a degree in sports coaching or sport psychology, simply because they spend more time looking at the aspects affecting performance.

    To gain employment from coaching you do not need a degree, but simply the FA coaching certificates. They also run courses in psychology, fitness, and do more age appropriate courses so that you can focus your learning in a specific area.

    As for tactics, just play Football Manager
    Yeah he's doing a bunch of badges, general coaching and goalkeeper coaching (and some cricket ones :lolwut:) I think so he knows what he's looking for in a degree if he even does one. Not sure how usable a degree would be in the big picture anyway :dontknow: I've seen him browsing though UCAS and brochures so I think he is planning on something but will let him know your thoughts, so thanks.
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    (Original post by white_haired_wizard)
    Nothing/little will change because the public attitude won't change and it doesn't want to/need to change. Sports-inclined women don't always go for football first and foremost. It's a sport more prevalent amongst men, largely because it is a more masculine sport, a contact sport with plenty of aggression thrown in. This is why football doesn't appeal as much to women as it does to men. It isn't a particularly feminine game.

    Women will never achieve the same level of football standard as men. It's a contact sport, one with aggression. Womens football is very different to mens football, a very different form of football and for this reason it appeals to far fewer people. Watching a game of womens football feels more like watching a gentle and friendly kick-about in the local park - as a male speaking, it's lacking competitiveness and steel and for this reason, womens football is a turn-off.

    Football is currently the most popular sport amongst women in this country, and that is still rising at a very accelerated rate. Women do play with less aggression, but the male form of the game appears to be losing that in this present moment.

    Physically, we have yet to see if women can become as technically advanced as men when it comes to skill and ability. Perhaps a lower natural muscle density may inhibit them slightly, but that is still yet to be seen. Currently it is society that is preventing women from excelling at the game.

    Such comparatively small numbers of girls play football. Very few play at school, and a lot do not begin to play until they are much older, where as a lot of boys are given a ball to kick as soon as they can walk. From my research (although you don't need to be a genius to realise this) I can gather that the current social stigma is that all girls who play football are lesbians. Naturally, this is very offputting for all who may harbour an interest.

    For so many reasons it may not be possible for women to achieve the same standard as men, but we won't know that until they are given the backing to try. It is such dismissive attitudes towards the women's game that will forever keep them underneath the symbolic penis of male oppression.
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    (Original post by Colbert)
    Yeah he's doing a bunch of badges, general coaching and goalkeeper coaching (and some cricket ones :lolwut:) I think so he knows what he's looking for in a degree if he even does one. Not sure how usable a degree would be in the big picture anyway :dontknow: I've seen him browsing though UCAS and brochures so I think he is planning on something but will let him know your thoughts, so thanks.


    If he wants to know more about football, I would advise reading some books and getting an ESPN subscription, as well as attending more professional games. That will save around £9,000 in tuition fees

    A degree will probably be very beneficial in the long run, seeing as a lot of people within sport are under-educated idiots. Having a degree will be like having blue blood. "Mate, watch out, this one's clever" they will say as they gasp in awe.

    There are a few good looking masters courses available. I think there is a good coaching one in Newcastle, but I have personally been looking at a masters in sports performance analysis at Portsmouth. I'll have to leave it for a couple of years because I won't have the money, and with a predicted bad final grade, I will need further experience and qualifications to gain entry.
 
 
 
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