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    Well I live in a village because that's where my parents live? :dontknow:
    It can be quite nice, but one thing that really bothers me is that nothing ever stays a secret for long. In secondary school I made some comment about my love life to my singing teacher, who then told one of her friends and then it somehow found its way back to my mum :rolleyes: And, more recently, one of my mum's best friend's husbands left her for another woman, and one of her biggest concerns was people gossiping about her. It can be really quite suffocating sometimes.
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    (Original post by Little_My)
    Dear God villages are life sucking. Would trade to live in a town or a city in a heartbeat, personally I hate it.
    agreed
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    (Original post by doubledot)
    I've spent my entire life travelling around the world, from the biggest of skyscraper cities to the most rural of villages found smack dab in the middle of a jungle. I honestly feel happier out in a village rather than the hectic chaos of a city. That's not to say I hate metropolitan places, but my preferences in life lean more towards the tranquility (which you probably see as boredom) of 'village life'. I like quiet evenings in a tiny house with a book and a bundle of blankets. I like early morning walks out in a forest with no noise made but the crunch of leaves beneath my feet. And for lacking in amenities? I don't think they're lacking in anything that I need. I'm even fine with not having to go to a supermarket and having to grow my own vegetables and fruit - it keeps me busy and the end product is more satisfying. Again though, this is all personal preference.

    No two people are the same, so it doesn't really matter what age you are - some will prefer living in the city because they love the busy, modern life where you can go out to a new, futuristic club every night, and some will prefer solitude out in the countryside where you can spend days roaming fields and not see a single soul. There's no right or wrong to where you want to live. You can't force somebody to like to live somewhere that makes them unhappy.

    -- EDIT: You say go into a house or plug in an ipod for peace and quiet.. Quiet usually means silence. You can't get as much silence out in the city as you can in the countryside. You can go into a house, but you'll still hear ambulances and police cars all night long. You can plug in your ipod, but that completely defies the 'wanting silence' point.
    Currently in a large town and i have heard one siren. went to sheffield and i probably heard about four. I think people can be misguided. To me what you just described is absolute hell. I find myself far too busy to grow my own food. I enjoy just popping to the supermarket because i can pick up some bargains, its warm and i occassionally meet people i know. Amenities is something a city will always have over a village
    I still cant understand why anyone would choose this life unless its the only one they know
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    because smoking a doob in a field looking at the night sky is better then smoking a doob whilst listening to traffic drone on and have light pollution ruin your view at night.
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    When I'm not at uni in the city I live in a tiny village with my parents. Being able to drive is essential, as it would take me over half an hour to walk to the nearest bus stop, where buses are irregular and slow. I really enjoy it though. I love the natural environment..the feeling of walking across grass and earth and beneath trees, knowing that it's not just artificially placed there by a human. I love the mini ecosystems, beneath the fallen leaves and in the rotting wood. It's so peaceful...you can lie in a field and hear absolutely nothing - that's something you could never have in a city. Your skin feels clearer and your pores and nose not clogged with pollution. I love seeing a horizon, and I love that when you turn the lights off at night it's pitch black.
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    (Original post by mike_mike)
    It's just you not having enough stress in your life, not having a job or too many responsibilities, that's why you don't understand people who want to live a healthier, calmer, satisfying life.
    Don't give me the financial argument, British people can make money in villages too.
    From the legal point of view we are both within that range
    From the mental point of view you are within that range, I'm not.



    I'd make the trade, let me know when it's the case.
    If you lived with my family then i think you would be yearning to live in a city, to me a job comes with peace rather than stress with living with them, that brings me nicely onto another point of why move where family is and why is extended family like parents and grandparents important to be close by ? they drag you down.
    If people make money in villages then why isnt Alan Sugar holed up in a little welsh village rather than London
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    (Original post by edd360)
    because smoking a doob in a field looking at the night sky is better then smoking a doob whilst listening to traffic drone on and have light pollution ruin your view at night.
    So you would rather live somewhere quiet because its nicer to get illegally high ? sensible. But ok then lets go down this path, wouldn't it be easier to score drugs in a city ?
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    (Original post by mike_mike)
    It's just you not having enough stress in your life, not having a job or too many responsibilities, that's why you don't understand people who want to live a healthier, calmer, satisfying life.
    Don't give me the financial argument, British people can make money in villages too.
    From the legal point of view we are both within that range
    From the mental point of view you are within that range, I'm not.



    I'd make the trade, let me know when it's the case.
    Villages aren't as wholesome as you think, there can be a lot of racism, homophobia and mistreatment of young people in some esp if the majority of the population are old and conservative.
    Literally everyone in mine is either a farmer or a chav. I guarantee you will be bored stiff within a month if you lived in one.
    It can also be really expensive, having to pay a lot of money to get a train or bus to go anywhere.
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    (Original post by glance)
    When I'm not at uni in the city I live in a tiny village with my parents. Being able to drive is essential, as it would take me over half an hour to walk to the nearest bus stop, where buses are irregular and slow. I really enjoy it though. I love the natural environment..the feeling of walking across grass and earth and beneath trees, knowing that it's not just artificially placed there by a human. I love the mini ecosystems, beneath the fallen leaves and in the rotting wood. It's so peaceful...you can lie in a field and hear absolutely nothing - that's something you could never have in a city. Your skin feels clearer and your pores and nose not clogged with pollution. I love seeing a horizon, and I love that when you turn the lights off at night it's pitch black.
    Lets look at this from a different slant. You could either live in a city and stay in the city where you have supermarkets and shops basically that stay supplied thanks to air, or same situation in a village with you having to grow your own food, find a well paid job, all of this without leaving, where would you pick ?
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    So you would rather live somewhere quiet because its nicer to get illegally high ? sensible. But ok then lets go down this path, wouldn't it be easier to score drugs in a city ?
    But if you were in a small village, it would be easier to grow your own
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    (Original post by Little_My)
    Villages aren't as wholesome as you think, there can be a lot of racism, homophobia and mistreatment of young people in some esp if the majority of the population are old and conservative.
    Literally everyone in mine is either a farmer or a chav. I Guarantee you will be bored stiff within a month if you lived in one.
    It can also be really expensive, having to pay a lot of money to get a train or bus to go anywhere.
    Woah woah, nothing wrong with being conservative, just depends on whether its new conserv or old. I am a proud conservative that has lived in a labour stronghold for 16 years
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    (Original post by edd360)
    But if you were in a small village, it would be easier to grow your own
    I was under the illusion police still operate in villages, look at hot fuzz
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    I am not disagreeing its probably lovely up there but still, i could go visit, why would anyone live there permenantly, why not have a second home there and have like monthly breaks.
    Don’t get me started on second homes, there is nothing more irritating than seeing houses lie empty for most of the time yet driving up house prices and ensuring the young in the country (some of the poorest) will never be able to afford to buy locally.

    Have you not considered there may be a reason that people from a faster and more exciting pace of life don't visit ? We are not arrogant but its plain to see that there is so much more to do in a city and that a village boasts of nothing but nice quaint little walks in the countryside which like i have stated earlier is nice one in a blue moon. Busses to me should be coming every 10 minutes or less.
    They do visit, how do you think our coffee shops and caravan sites survive. Many of them are, especially when it comes to agriculture and country sports. Tell most people from the city you go shooting for fun and you get a tirade against you, same when you tell them the realities of farming like the heaps of dead lambs at lambing time you have had to clobber over the head for some reason or another.

    Why is knowing everybody a good thing ? Villages are notorious for being *****y and have people who dont mind their own business and stick their oars in when its not needed.
    You just rise above all that stuff but its outweighed by the benefits, like if your ill you get people phoning to see if your ok and that’s nice.
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    Woah woah, nothing wrong with being conservative, just depends on whether its new conserv or old. I am a proud conservative that has lived in a labour stronghold for 16 years
    I mean old conservative, no disrespect
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    I'd like to live in a village, all the orgy malarky I assume goes on sounds like a laugh
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    I was under the illusion police still operate in villages, look at hot fuzz
    I don't really know why we are arguing over a hypothetical situation? But anyway for humours sake, I did say it would be easier to grow your own, which it would be. Police don't just randomly raid houses. And unless you are an idiot, it wouldn't be hard to keep a plant for personal use under the radar.
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    I've lived in a village all my life and love it, advantages being that there were only 14 people in my class, all my teachers lived within ten mins drive of the school, all the school staff are family friends.. Freedom, peace and quiet - we can go to the beach in the summer at nighttime and be the only people there, it's a three mile stretch so lovely. Can walk through the fields in summer to my friend's horses/sheep.. It sounds ridic. but we used to go raspberry picking too!.. We're only 30 miles north of the nearest city, and ten miles south from the nearest town - however most people I know only go through once a month or so .. Everyone knows everyone and there's always somebody there when you need them .. Can leave your back door unlocked too ! Disadvantages - a poor bus service, everyone knows your business, there's only a part time GP surgery, with one doctor and one nurse.. only three shops and only one sells mags, booze and that.. when it snows you get completely cut off, however miss a lot of school due to it... I think it depends where said village is - because I live in Aberdeenshire, the whole flipping area is villages, mountains and beaches so it's the norm for everyone! I do miss it when I'm at uni!
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    (Original post by Renner)
    Don’t get me started on second homes, there is nothing more irritating than seeing houses lie empty for most of the time yet driving up house prices and ensuring the young in the country (some of the poorest) will never be able to afford to buy locally.

    They do visit, how do you think our coffee shops and caravan sites survive. Many of them are, especially when it comes to agriculture and country sports. Tell most people from the city you go shooting for fun and you get a tirade against you, same when you tell them the realities of farming like the heaps of dead lambs at lambing time you have had to clobber over the head for some reason or another.

    You just rise above all that stuff but its outweighed by the benefits, like if your ill you get people phoning to see if your ok and that’s nice.
    i think the idea of second homes is a great idea, the young shouldn't buy locally, i am all for the population moving about and familys experiancing a little bit more culture. I have been shooting and as much as i enjoy it i wouldnt move my family from where we love to be closer to somewhere i could either drive to.
    If you are dissatisfied with farming then stop, i would, as like i said, im not a complete city boy, my grandad sells farm machinery around the north of england, i am well aware of the flip side of the discussion and people living in villages and in cities and that is where i am basing facts from my arguement from.
    Why not live somewhere without the close knit community, why not have a house on your own with no one around for 10 miles ? wouldnt that be better, im sure the kids would love to grow up not being able to visit friends when they pleased
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    I used to live in a rural area and loved it. Then I moved to london from uni and love it too. Now I am back fro christmas I just find it dull for now, in the summer I loved it though. In winter I just don't, poor weather is so much more of an issue back home simply because the things I love about a village is that you can be outside the whole time in a beautiful place. London in that respect feels rather dead, or at best synthetic.
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    The ideal is to live in a village that is not too isolated from other (bigger) towns and cities. I love my village, but I can be in a neighbouring town with pretty much any amenity you'd want in 15 minutes, or can be in Central London in 35 minutes. Though if you can't drive and don't have parents who'd be prepared to give you a lift other places, I can imagine it'd be a bit of a bugger.

    This way you get the best bits of country village life (fresh air, scenery, peace and quiet, personal space, ability to play music stupidly loudly into the night without disturbing anyone, etc) without all the drawbacks associated with cities (pollution, 24/7 noise, no personal space, have to be quiet at night, no greenery, etc).
 
 
 
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