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    (Original post by Steph90)
    I might actually give it a go in the new year. I've decided I am going to download and burn the DVD/CD tomorrow.
    Hehe, sweet . Let us know how it goes ^_^!
    EMZ=]
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    (Original post by Steph90)
    Ah.. I remember using Slackware. I started when I was around 13-14 years old (21 y/o now). By far my favourite distro.

    Its been years since I stopped using *nix, I've considered returning to it several times but just haven't had the time.

    Since I purchased this Sony Vaio and I was never going to use 500gb (I use an external 1TB HD for my media), I partitioned the drive with the hope that I would soon install some form of Linux on it. Its been over a year and I still haven't.

    The fact I'm doing a non-computer related degree doesn't help and I always find myself extremely busy. Lol, this reminds me that I used to be a geek before. #

    Edited to add: Do any of you guys have a link to any software that will detect all my hardware and then somewhere I can check it against and see if my install will have any difficult elements to it?

    I don't mind going through it and I think the days of waiting 3hours for a full Slackware install to complete are probably over? Also, most driver issues have probably been dealt with?

    I've managed to get a mostly complete Slackware install done in under two hours, I think it's moved on a bit since then though . It'll run on anything though, that's why I love it so much.
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    I love Ubuntu (Gnome, not Kubuntu) and I think it works just fine. Unfortunately some windows programs will not run (or not smoothly enough, anyway) on it, so probably dual-boot is still the best solution.
    However, thumbs up to Linux !!!
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    For all those who dual boot
    download
    "plasma desktop"
    in the package manager

    "plasma desktop" is much faster less memory etc
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    (Original post by Emor)


    Hehe, sweet . Let us know how it goes ^_^!
    EMZ=]

    (Original post by NS17)
    I've managed to get a mostly complete Slackware install done in under two hours, I think it's moved on a bit since then though . It'll run on anything though, that's why I love it so much.
    What do you guys think of installing Slackware inside a VMware instead of doing a dual boot?
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    I dont get how any one can even work with slackware let alone install it
    where do you get your tutorials from?
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    (Original post by Steph90)
    What do you guys think of installing Slackware inside a VMware instead of doing a dual boot?
    I previously had it installed on VMWare before doing a dual-boot. It works quite well on VMWare if all you want to do is mess around configuring stuff.
    It's easier for me to dual-boot because on Mac OS X I can resize the partitions of my HDD without them being wiped. I'm not sure if I'd be that bothered to wipe my primary OS' partition just so Slackware can run faster and stuff.
    EKZ=]
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    On my mac i can use that boot camp properly it says i cant install something on it without doing a full reinstall ?
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    Ubuntu 10.10 here.

    Awesome OS.
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    Ah Linux. I used it for about two years on my old PC (as the sole OS) before I got my Mac.

    There was a time when you had to know a lot about using the command line and manual editing of config files and all that good stuff, now thanks primarily to the Ubuntu-based distros, it's easy enough for anyone to use.

    It's also a great learning OS for people interested in the inner workings of computers. All the source code is available freely for you to have a look at and there's loads of great tools included for tinkerers or people who want to learn UNIX, if that's your sort of thing. Because of my experiences using Linux, I use the OS X Terminal an awful lot as I've realised that sometimes, the command line is the best, most efficient way of doing something.

    Another nice thing is that if you're not afraid to get your hands dirty, you can customise every aspect of the system to suit you. Although that can get slightly addictive. :laugh:

    It's a really great OS, I mean it's got a few bugs and a few things that perhaps don't work as they should - and if you want any commercial apps working out of the box then forget it. But it's free, fast, has inherent protection against viruses, and did I mention that it's free? Also, the desktop effects are insane - I'd suggest that anyone who uses Ubuntu has a look at compiz, although I think it comes with newer versions as standard these days.

    I still run Linux in VirtualBox just so I can keep up to date with what's going on over there. :yep:
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    What is the best computer code / script that a person can learn
    ie in terms of usefulness
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    I personall don't like Linux. I have used Ubuntu before and although it has a much faster start up time than windows, wine doesn't support all programs and there aren't as many features as there are in Windows. But then again, I had been using windows for about 10 years and so was used to it. If you have an old computer that runs quite slowly, then you should get Ubuntu (the best operating system on Linux).
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    old pc = light weight linux distro not ubuntu
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    (Original post by alex12alex11)
    I personall don't like Linux. I have used Ubuntu before and although it has a much faster start up time than windows, wine doesn't support all programs and there aren't as many features as there are in Windows. But then again, I had been using windows for about 10 years and so was used to it. If you have an old computer that runs quite slowly, then you should get Ubuntu (the best operating system on Linux).
    You said that the only used Ubuntu before but claim it's still the best distribution for Linux? I have been using both Wine and many different Linux distributions for over 10 years (see my post on the first page) and once you get to know the inner-workings and architecture of the source code you can do anything you want, so please don't say it has less features than Windows because that simply isn't true.

    Sure Wine doesn't support all Windows applications but once you get to know Wine itself things because insanely easier and you can simply use a 3rd party application to manually configure Wine to accept, run and use certain Windows DLLs.

    Unfortunately, not nearly enough people know about Linux for it to be anywhere near as well known as Microsoft but once you understand that it's all (essentially) free and open source and I think that once the realisation of the philosophy behind the project hits people they will turn away from the megacorps. (Although, admittedly most distributions besides Ubuntu aren't very user-friendly at first and certainly aren't for the computer illiterate thus making the jump between the user-friendly, out of the box, closed source Windows to the lesser known, basement dwelling Linux even more daunting.)
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    (Original post by Atrozius Faatz)
    ...
    Because of my experiences using Linux, I use the OS X Terminal an awful lot as I've realised that sometimes, the command line is the best, most efficient way of doing something.

    Another nice thing is that if you're not afraid to get your hands dirty, you can customise every aspect of the system to suit you. Although that can get slightly addictive. :laugh:

    ...

    I still run Linux in VirtualBox just so I can keep up to date with what's going on over there. :yep:
    I'm scared to use the OS X terminal now. I tried to change the file permissions for a system folder and then everything messed up and sudo stop working and then the password for default user stop working and I need to use sudo to reset the user or something and it was just a paradox :P. And then everything graphically started to stop working and I had to re-install :P. The directory was /private I think. But yeah, I find OS X quite locked down tbh.
    And btw if you want any terminals for dual-booting Linux on your Mac, esp. Ubuntu, Debian or Slackware, I can PM you some if you want since I've spent quite a while trying to find decent tutorials :P.
    (Original post by blueray)
    old pc = light weight linux distro not ubuntu
    There's Xubuntu which uses the XFCE window manager, which would run quite well on most PCs with-in the last 5 years or so... though if we're talking very old PCs then you're right you'd probably be better with something simpler. Though you could just install a simpler window manager on xubuntu like flubox. Though afaik it's not very userfriendly.
    (Original post by blueray)
    I dont get how any one can even work with slackware let alone install it
    where do you get your tutorials from?
    This is a tutorial I think I used. I'm not sure though because it says it's for 13, and I've got 13.1. It goes through in depth how to install it step-by-step. I also recommend checking out the Slackbook after install since it explains a lot of the basics. And I'd do it in VMWare first rather than doing a full install incase you mess up the first time like I did :P.
    (Original post by blueray)
    On my mac i can use that boot camp properly it says i cant install something on it without doing a full reinstall ?
    That's weird . Though I wouldn't recommend using boot camp for a linux install but yeah(some tutorials say you should/can but I prefer disk utility).
    A couple of times I've had to reinstall Mac OS X and format the HDD because I've messed up the partitioning- for some reason bootcamp's quite specific, but it's never produced an error that specifically said I'd need to reinstall in order for it to work.
    (Original post by alex12alex11)
    If you have an old computer that runs quite slowly, then you should get Ubuntu (the best operating system on Linux).
    Highly debatable :P. There is no best distribution really, it's down to what the user wants.
    EMZ=]
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    (Original post by blueray)
    What is the best computer code / script that a person can learn
    ie in terms of usefulness
    Python is pretty good as a general coding/scripting language, though if you want to work on most proper applications you'll need C/C++.
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    (Original post by Emor)
    I'm scared to use the OS X terminal now. I tried to change the file permissions for a system folder and then everything messed up and sudo stop working and then the password for default user stop working and I need to use sudo to reset the user or something and it was just a paradox :P. And then everything graphically started to stop working and I had to re-install :P. The directory was /private I think. But yeah, I find OS X quite locked down tbh.
    Ouch. Yeah /private is one of those directories I'd stay well away from. That's the thing with the CLI; it's incredibly powerful but can also be incredibly dangerous (sudo rm -rf / comes to mind). Still, as the old saying goes: "UNIX was not designed to stop you from doing stupid things, because that would also stop you from doing clever things." :p:

    Sometimes reinstalling is all that you can do when something like that happens!

    As for OS X being locked down - it's certainly more locked down than Linux, but I've found it surprisingly pliable, I find MS Windows more suffocating than OS X in terms of openness. On my Mac I can do some coding in vi, run some shell scripts - really as long as I've got command line access so I can see what's going on in there, I'm not too fussed about being able to mess with the system. About the only thing I've really altered on my Mac (that wasn't available in system preferences) is changing the dock to 2D mode, apart from that the out of the box settings are fine by me. :yep:

    (Original post by Emor)
    And btw if you want any terminals for dual-booting Linux on your Mac, esp. Ubuntu, Debian or Slackware, I can PM you some if you want since I've spent quite a while trying to find decent tutorials :P.
    Thanks for the offer but I'm happy using Linux in a VM for now, I think my days of dual-booting are over now I've got enough RAM and CPU to have Linux open alongside my Mac apps.
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    (Original post by Emor)
    I previously had it installed on VMWare before doing a dual-boot. It works quite well on VMWare if all you want to do is mess around configuring stuff.
    It's easier for me to dual-boot because on Mac OS X I can resize the partitions of my HDD without them being wiped. I'm not sure if I'd be that bothered to wipe my primary OS' partition just so Slackware can run faster and stuff.
    EKZ=]
    Good to hear that I can install it on VMware.

    Yeah I just primarily wanna get used to it again so a dual boot isn't important. I've got 4Gb Ram and 500gb HD so i should be OK. Since yesterday I've slowly been typing into google, one by one my hardware specs to see if its compatible and everything seems good to go so far

    I've had some pretty complex setup before with different unix systems (i've even used FreeBSD and OpenBSD :tongue:), so I should get the hang of it pretty quick I'm guessing.

    How much ram/HD space do you think I should allocate to it to get as much software on it as possible?


    (Original post by Emor)
    I previously had it installed on VMWare before doing a dual-boot. It works quite well on VMWare if all you want to do is mess around configuring stuff.
    It's easier for me to dual-boot because on Mac OS X I can resize the partitions of my HDD without them being wiped. I'm not sure if I'd be that bothered to wipe my primary OS' partition just so Slackware can run faster and stuff.
    EKZ=]
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    (Original post by Atrozius Faatz)
    Ouch. Yeah /private is one of those directories I'd stay well away from. That's the thing with the CLI; it's incredibly powerful but can also be incredibly dangerous (sudo rm -rf / comes to mind). Still, as the old saying goes: "UNIX was not designed to stop you from doing stupid things, because that would also stop you from doing clever things." :p:

    Sometimes reinstalling is all that you can do when something like that happens!

    As for OS X being locked down - it's certainly more locked down than Linux, but I've found it surprisingly pliable, I find MS Windows more suffocating than OS X in terms of openness. On my Mac I can do some coding in vi, run some shell scripts - really as long as I've got command line access so I can see what's going on in there, I'm not too fussed about being able to mess with the system. About the only thing I've really altered on my Mac (that wasn't available in system preferences) is changing the dock to 2D mode, apart from that the out of the box settings are fine by me. :yep:



    Thanks for the offer but I'm happy using Linux in a VM for now, I think my days of dual-booting are over now I've got enough RAM and CPU to have Linux open alongside my Mac apps.
    Yeah, it's kind of silly. I was trying to edit the hosts file in some stupid way, can't really remember how tbh. I probably shouldn't have even attempted using sudo on mac os x if the operation I was trying to do wasn't allowed under normal user permissions.
    I've never really had a problem with sudo when it comes to using Linux really. The few times I've messed up I've always been able to undo the mistakes I've made.
    And okay ^_^. Probably better, for some reason though I just like running OS' not from a VM :P.

    (Original post by Steph90)
    Good to hear that I can install it on VMware.

    Yeah I just primarily wanna get used to it again so a dual boot isn't important. I've got 4Gb Ram and 500gb HD so i should be OK. Since yesterday I've slowly been typing into google, one by one my hardware specs to see if its compatible and everything seems good to go so far

    I've had some pretty complex setup before with different unix systems (i've even used FreeBSD and OpenBSD :tongue:), so I should get the hang of it pretty quick I'm guessing.

    How much ram/HD space do you think I should allocate to it to get as much software on it as possible?
    Hehe awesome about the compatibility ^_^. And cool, Slackware's probably the most complex OS I've used really. Maybe in a year or two I'll install Gentoo...
    For me I gave it 1.5 GB RAM... I think(I have 3 GB RAM btw) and 20 GB HDD space, for the VM. You've probably taken this into account, but if you're using FAT 32 then it'll complain about files above 4 GB.
    If all you want is applications then 10-15 GB should be fine really. A full install takes up around 5-6 GB.
    On my dual-boot install it's only 20 GB too(I removed the VM) and I've never really felt the need for anything more, even though I'll occasionally download podcasts, tv shows, films and stuff and then delete them after watching.
    EMZ=]
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    Wow slackware does my head in
    i think ill stick with kubuntu by far the most coolest in terms of looks features and you can use compiz as well
 
 
 
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