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    (Original post by Peteo)
    So he could even pay the fees direct to the university and they wouldn't check? Or would this mean i'm no longer entitled to the tuition fees, maintenence fees and grants?
    Get the tuition fee loan and put the money you would've been using to pay tuition fees in an isa or whatever.
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    (Original post by tiny hobbit)
    In that case, your household income had presumably already dropped by April 2009, so using the default year of April 2009-April 2010 would suit you anyway.
    Thanks for that Cleared up a few things, i appreciate your help.

    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    That is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard.
    How on earth is that ridiculous? It's be ridiculous NOT to do it as you would be literally throwing way money you're entitled to.

    (Original post by MylesXD)
    :eek:How can you say that when your from Scotland :eek:
    Haha that's so true!


    (Original post by ily_em)
    My parents' income combined puts me over the limit for maintenance grant (I think... or I'd just get 50 quid or something) but because my parents are divorced I qualify for the full amount of grants and bursaries. I've done nothing wrong; all me and my mum did was answer the questions on the student finance forms honestly with my household income etc, and I got a letter through saying what I was entitled to. I'm not exactly going to say no to more money, am I? What would you do in that position, reject it?

    I don't even know how I'd be able to ask for less grant as I had to ask for the full loan to be able to support myself, and I don't recall being able to reject grants; you either apply for both, or none at all. On the bursary side, I just got a letter from my uni halfway through the first term stating how much I'd get and when it'd go into my account, with no option to reject that either.

    Nice neg. Thanks for explaining your reasoning :rolleyes: I find it hard to believe that there are people who would reject grant money.
    Haters gonna hate! If people were offered cash legally I doubt anybody would reject it and if they say they would they are just trying to make you feel bad as a way of counteracting their jealousy


    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    If daddy pays the tuition fees you will not get a tuition fee loan!
    Depends how its done obviously... If he pays direct I won't no, but if he pays to me, I will yes as I could invest the money from my dad, and pay use the loan to pay for the fees. It's the same thing anyway, just done in the most beneficial way, and legal.
    This is explained well by the previous poster.

    (Original post by Taiko)
    Actually, the parent you are assessed on depends on their status for the academic year you're applying for, not the past financial year. For example they could've been together for the whole tax year, and split in the August before you start. Only one parent would be assessed in this case.

    Likewise, a parent could've been single for the financial year being assessed, but a partner moves in with them before the September you start. The partner also has to have their income assessed, but based on that previous tax year when they were not living together.
    Thanks, appreciate your input
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    (Original post by ily_em)
    My parents' income combined puts me over the limit for maintenance grant (I think... or I'd just get 50 quid or something) but because my parents are divorced I qualify for the full amount of grants and bursaries. I've done nothing wrong; all me and my mum did was answer the questions on the student finance forms honestly with my household income etc, and I got a letter through saying what I was entitled to. I'm not exactly going to say no to more money, am I? What would you do in that position, reject it?

    I don't even know how I'd be able to ask for less grant as I had to ask for the full loan to be able to support myself, and I don't recall being able to reject grants; you either apply for both, or none at all. On the bursary side, I just got a letter from my uni halfway through the first term stating how much I'd get and when it'd go into my account, with no option to reject that either.

    Nice neg. Thanks for explaining your reasoning :rolleyes: I find it hard to believe that there are people who would reject grant money.
    But the thing is my family isn't exactly rich - my mum's a part time lawyer and my dad's a full time lawyer. We can look after ourselves fine at the moment, but we can't afford the price of accommodation when I go to university. This means I'll be saddled with much more debt than people just below the threshold, as they'll be getting much more in the way of grants and bursaries. It's supposed to be a fair system that you only pay back when you're rich enough and to be honest I don't see how your parents income comes into it, if you earn over 15k after graduating then you can give a bit back.
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    (Original post by davidmarsh01)
    But the thing is my family isn't exactly rich - my mum's a part time lawyer and my dad's a full time lawyer. We can look after ourselves fine at the moment, but we can't afford the price of accommodation when I go to university. This means I'll be saddled with much more debt than people just below the threshold, as they'll be getting much more in the way of grants and bursaries. It's supposed to be a fair system that you only pay back when you're rich enough and to be honest I don't see how your parents income comes into it, if you earn over 15k after graduating then you can give a bit back.
    I'm not arguing that it's a fair system!! It's stupid imo that I can get so much money than you. All I'm saying is that not many people would say no to the money as it's practically handed to you on a plate.
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    (Original post by Peteo)
    Depends how its done obviously... If he pays direct I won't no, but if he pays to me, I will yes as I could invest the money from my dad, and pay use the loan to pay for the fees. It's the same thing anyway, just done in the most beneficial way, and legal.
    Lol this is basically stealing from your dad then? The goverment are paying your tutition fees, you will aqquire a debt, your dad is giving you money and you will be saving it rather then paying off the debt that your dad is giving you the money for.

    It might be fair saying well I will pay it off in 3/4 years when I finish and keep the interest I have earned but your dad could keep that money for his own use(and gain his own interest from it) until you need it to actually pay your loan off?
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    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    It is the advice moneysavingexpert.com give you.
    Putting your maintenance loan in an ISA is pointless for three reasons.

    1) As a student you're not paying tax

    2) The interest rate from ISA's at the moment are terrible and below inflation.

    3) You will never get any money as students constantly need access to the money meaning no interest gained.
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    (Original post by Peteo)
    Thanks for that Cleared up a few things, i appreciate your help.



    How on earth is that ridiculous? It's be ridiculous NOT to do it as you would be literally throwing way money you're entitled to.



    Haha that's so true!




    Haters gonna hate! If people were offered cash legally I doubt anybody would reject it and if they say they would they are just trying to make you feel bad as a way of counteracting their jealousy




    Depends how its done obviously... If he pays direct I won't no, but if he pays to me, I will yes as I could invest the money from my dad, and pay use the loan to pay for the fees. It's the same thing anyway, just done in the most beneficial way, and legal.
    This is explained well by the previous poster.



    Thanks, appreciate your input
    Read my reply to jap.
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    (Original post by whacks)
    Lol this is basically stealing from your dad then? The goverment are paying your tutition fees, you will aqquire a debt your dad is giving you money and you will be saving it rather then paying off the debt that your dad is giving you the money for.

    It might be fair saying well I will pay it off in 3/4 years when I finish and keep the interest I have earned but you dad could keep that money for his own use(and gain his own interest from it) until you need it to actually pay your loan off?
    It's not stealing, my dad offered to pay university so I may aswell do it in the most beneficial way or else i'm literally throwing money away..

    Also, the government do not pay your tuition fees, you have to pay it back because it's a loan!
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    (Original post by Peteo)
    It's not stealing, my dad offered to pay university so I may aswell do it in the most beneficial way or else i'm literally throwing money away..

    Also, the government do not pay your tuition fees, you have to pay it back because it's a loan!
    Yes you are, does your dad know this is what you intend?

    Have you told your dad that you will take his money and still take the tutition and maintainance loans? It looks to me that your dad is paying you this money so you dont have to take any loans out.
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    (Original post by Jmzie-Coupe)
    Putting your maintenance loan in an ISA is pointless for three reasons.

    1) As a student you're not paying tax

    2) The interest rate from ISA's at the moment are terrible and below inflation.

    3) You will never get any money as students constantly need access to the money meaning no interest gained.

    This is why I said "I'm planning on getting a student loan ETC, and investing it in ISAs or other more profitable investments" meaning if I can't find more profitable or aren't willing to take the risks associated with possibly more profitable I could always "fall back" on an ISA. What would you suggest i invest it in?

    I won't need access to the maintenence loan as my parents are paying for the costs of university, therefore can invest it without needing access to it so when I get it, it will be invested straight away. Also, I may aswell get a student loan even though my parents are paying for university as you will never have access to such a low interest loan (only inflation) so that can be profitable to invest etc
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    (Original post by whacks)
    Yes you are, does your dad know this is what you intend?

    Have you told your dad that you will take his money and still take the tutition and maintainance loans? It looks to me that your dad is paying you this money so you dont have to take any loans out.
    Yes, and it's fine as he said he would pay for it anyway, so it isn't costing him anything, and said it is sensible as it is making the best use off resources.

    I can't think of another way of getting money you can invest at such a low interest rate, so why not take advantage of it?
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    (Original post by davidmarsh01)
    But the thing is my family isn't exactly rich - my mum's a part time lawyer and my dad's a full time lawyer. We can look after ourselves fine at the moment, but we can't afford the price of accommodation when I go to university. This means I'll be saddled with much more debt than people just below the threshold, as they'll be getting much more in the way of grants and bursaries. It's supposed to be a fair system that you only pay back when you're rich enough and to be honest I don't see how your parents income comes into it, if you earn over 15k after graduating then you can give a bit back.
    The system is fair in your terms, why should someone like you get the same amount of money as someone who only has one parent hes father is on the side lines whereas his mum aint. Fair enough if he spends 1/2 of the week with both parents but i doubt it. So taking that into account your parents would have combined total of £55,000 compared to someone parents who earn less than 20,000 how can you justified it?

    I do believe that everyone should get at least £3750 which the new system sees to, but you shouldnt get more than that. If you need more money work for it! tbh your lucky
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    (Original post by Peteo)
    Yes, and it's fine as he said he would pay for it anyway, so it isn't costing him anything, and said it is sensible as it is making the best use off resources.

    I can't think of another way of getting money you can invest at such a low interest rate, so why not take advantage of it?
    Are you sure u ll be able to cope though? even with your dads money?
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    (Original post by MylesXD)
    The system is fair in your terms, why should someone like you get the same amount of money as someone who only has one parent hes father is on the side lines whereas his mum aint. Fair enough if he spends 1/2 of the week with both parents but i doubt it. So taking that into account your parents would have combined total of £55,000 compared to someone parents who early less than 20,000 how can you justified it?

    I do believe that everyone should get at least £3750 which the new system sees to, but you shouldnt get more than that. If you need more money work for it! tbh your lucky
    Agreed.

    (Original post by MylesXD)
    Are you sure u ll be able to cope though? even with your dads money?
    Is that sarcasm or something? Why wouldn't I be able to live off the same amount as everyone else?
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    (Original post by Peteo)
    Agreed.



    Is that sarcasm or something? Why wouldn't I be able to live off the same amount as everyone else?
    u kidding me right? most people get like £4000? and maybe £1000 grant?

    £4000 accomdation? £1000 to live off for the rest of the year?

    thats £25 quid week? for the next 40 weeks?

    Some people only get loan to cover the accomdation let alone food or travel
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    (Original post by MylesXD)
    The system is fair in your terms, why should someone like you get the same amount of money as someone who only has one parent hes father is on the side lines whereas his mum aint. Fair enough if he spends 1/2 of the week with both parents but i doubt it. So taking that into account your parents would have combined total of £55,000 compared to someone parents who earn less than 20,000 how can you justified it?

    I do believe that everyone should get at least £3750 which the new system sees to, but you shouldnt get more than that. If you need more money work for it! tbh your lucky
    Where did you pull 55k from? My dad alone probably earns more than that tbh...

    But what I was saying is that if it's truly based on how well you can pay later in life with your job, then surely your parents finances shouldn't come into play? How about everyone gets a loan, and those who can afford to pay it off in later life do so and after x years it is written off for those who can't. Giving people grants and bursaries just undermines the government's argument that it's based on wealth after university.
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    (Original post by Peteo)
    Yes, I agree with you to an extent that it is mad, but of course I am not complaining! In some respects I understand it as parents who split up often don't contribute at all, and it would be vastly unfair if people's parent's who were seperated were not entitled to the same benefits as the rest, and implementing a system to check this would cost a lot and end up in more beaurocracy or whatever they call it lol.

    Some people would also argue it's immoral but i'd say that if they were in this situation they would legally take what they are entitled to, I mean why the hell shouldn't I?

    So he could even pay the fees direct to the university and they wouldn't check? Or would this mean i'm no longer entitled to the tuition fees, maintenence fees and grants?
    As I said, I don't blame you for taking it, I would too, but it does show the problem with the system. You say it wouldn't be fair to assess both parents if parents are divorced as in some cases one parent wouldn't contribute - well there are thousands of students up and down the country whose parents earn over the threshold (combined or singularly) who refuse to give their children anything, and there's nothing they can do, just accept the minimum loan and get on with it. I am 24, my Mum is dead, I haven't lived with my Dad since 2005, but they very nearly assessed his income, meaning i'd have got the minimum loan (thankfully this didn't happen but it took me 6 months of writing a lot of letters and stuff to sort).

    If your dad pays the fees directly to uni, you won't get a tuition fee loan - it goes straight to the uni, not to you. You'd still get the maintenance loan, grants, bursarys etc. If you want the extra cash to live off/save, ask your dad to give you the £3300 or whatever for fees, get a fee loan, and keep the money your dad gives you.
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    (Original post by davidmarsh01)
    Where did you pull 55k from? My dad alone probably earns more than that tbh...

    But what I was saying is that if it's truly based on how well you can pay later in life with your job, then surely your parents finances shouldn't come into play? How about everyone gets a loan, and those who can afford to pay it off in later life do so and after x years it is written off for those who can't. Giving people grants and bursaries just undermines the government's argument that it's based on wealth after university.
    :eek: WTF and you are complaining, and you just mange to get by? what do your parents spend it on? you should serioulsy be able to afford accomadtions. Even with the lowest loan £2750

    The idea of the goverment is to make sure everyone has the oppunity to go to univerisity, BUT cant give everyone the highest amount of money.

    How can you say its NOT fair when your parents earn so much more compared to people who are not finacal better off, seems like the system is working if you ask me?
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    (Original post by davidmarsh01)
    Where did you pull 55k from? My dad alone probably earns more than that tbh...

    But what I was saying is that if it's truly based on how well you can pay later in life with your job, then surely your parents finances shouldn't come into play? How about everyone gets a loan, and those who can afford to pay it off in later life do so and after x years it is written off for those who can't. Giving people grants and bursaries just undermines the government's argument that it's based on wealth after university.
    Because parental achievement is often one of the best predictor of someone's child's achievement . Of coyurse this isn't 100% true but in more cases than not it is. This is because of a comindation of factors such as living in better areas with usually better schools which would make the person more likely to get better grades etc, or money for holidays that are educational, trips to museums, contacts with prospective employees and even parental input into work if they are not qualified themselves they may not be able to helpo somebody with a subject they are stuidyign with and many6 more reasons.

    That's why parents finances come into play.
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    (Original post by MylesXD)
    :eek: WTF and you are complaining, and you just mange to get by? what do your parents spend it on? you should serioulsy be able to afford accomadtions.

    The idea of the goverment is to make sure everyone has the oppunity to go to univerisity, BUT cant give everyone the highest amount of money.

    How can you say its NOT fair when your parents earn so much more compared to people who are not finacal better off, seems like the system is working if you ask me?
    Well we get by quite comfortably, but how much is accommodation usually? Around £100 a week? My household income it probably around £110k, then if you take off 40% tax, plus mortgage, plus living expenses I don't think I can afford accommodation without a loan.
 
 
 
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