First dog? Watch

Pheebs1201
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Magical Moogles)
I second what Emaemmaemily said. You need to be quite careful with staffys as they can have an aggressive nature, its sort of what they were bred for. Some are really lovely, but I've witnessed some really nasty ones as well. The fact that it's a rescue dog as well, might give it other problems you might not be prepared for.

A staffy attacked my dog at the park years ago, he ran away and suffered from some nasty injuries. He became really scared with other dogs afterwards. What makes it even more disastrous, is the owner actually released it on our dog, and was laughing, when it was attacking us! I get scared a bit now when I see one and always try to avoid.

But like I said above, some can be really nice as well. So I don't want to completely put you off the idea.

I think Labs are a good choice as well. We've now got a LabxCollie puppy. I recommend a cross breed, for the same reasons above. You'd need to do your research on both breeds, and possibly the temperments of the parents. If you get a rescue dog, its really important to try and find out their background. I would personally try and avoid a dog which has been mistreated, at least for your first time.

Just be warned, Labs aren't as well behaved as on the telly. They can be quite mischievous! They are intelligent, and I've yet to come across a Labrador with a bad temperment.
I agree that cross-breeds seem to make the best dogs!
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Emaemmaemily
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#22
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#22
Yeah, I had a similar experience to Magical Moogles.
A staffy attacked my dog (the xbread rescue dog i mentioned). She's terrified of other dogs now, it's horrible.

Of course, I'm not generalising, there can be some lovely staffies, but they were bred to fight, so especially if you don't know its past I'd be weary.

Rescue dogs can be some of the loveliest dogs in the world. We don't know our dog's history (she was just abandoned), and we're sure she had some issues because she was very frightful at first; but if you know how to handle dogs then you can over-come most issues from their past (as long as it's not really bad aggression or something).

I'd suggest choosing a more "loyal" or "obedient" breed for your first time, and not rushing the choosing process
I hope you're happy with whichever you choose
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brak3n
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Magical Moogles)
I second what Emaemmaemily said. You need to be quite careful with staffys as they can have an aggressive nature, its sort of what they were bred for. Some are really lovely, but I've witnessed some really nasty ones as well. The fact that it's a rescue dog as well, might give it other problems you might not be prepared for.

A staffy attacked my dog at the park years ago, he ran away and suffered from some nasty injuries. He became really scared with other dogs afterwards. What makes it even more disastrous, is the owner actually released it on our dog, and was laughing, when it was attacking us! I get scared a bit now when I see one and always try to avoid.

But like I said above, some can be really nice as well. So I don't want to completely put you off the idea. You just need to look into the history, and also observe how the dog acts with you. If it's nervous and avoids any contact, or worse, seems aggressive, I'd highly recommend looking elsewhere. If it's outgoing, and likes people then it should be fine, especially if its got a good history.

I think Labs are a good choice as well. We've now got a LabxCollie puppy, he was so easy to train, and has a lovely temperment. Most labradors do have a good temperment. I recommend a cross breed, for the same reasons above. You'd need to do your research on both breeds, and possibly the temperments of the parents. If you get a rescue dog, its really important to try and find out their background. I would personally try and avoid a dog which has been mistreated, at least for your first time.
I think that comment shows how it's irresponsible owners that lead to aggression problems, more than the breed. Staffies really seem to attract the terrible owners who don't discourage them from bad manners with other dogs, and breed them to make some easy money. So if you are after a Staffie I would make sure you get it from someone respectable, not just whoever is selling them nearby or cheaply. If it's from a breeder see what the mother is like with other dogs, or if it's from a rescue they'll be able to advise you on which dogs have a suitable temperament for you.
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M1F2R3
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#24
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#24
This is what you want
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MrsCrackFox
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#25
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If I were you, I'd get a dog breed book and flick through it.
Or just look online, what may seem like a suitable first time dog for some may not be suitable for others.
For example, one may be more suitable to city life with quick walks in the morning whereas others are more suited to long countryside walks, some dogs like larger families and children, whereas others get distressed easily and prefer a calm environment. Some demand attention all the time and some are happy keeping themselves to themselves and tend to sleep a lot.
Having said that, if you are a typical suburban family. Then I suggest a cocker spaniel. Very easy to look after, a little daily walk will suit them fine, they like to have attention, get on with children but aren't too demanding (unlike whippets!) they are happy snoozing in their basket and aren't fussy eaters.
And they are so loving and sweet!

(adult)

...And their puppies are the most adorable little things. :love:
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cdsmith1990
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#26
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^^ Awesome dogs when trained properly, seriously loyal and very intelligent, but they need firm training.

Edit: Referring to the Doberman.
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Mayden
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#27
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#27


Buster, my friends porkroll of a staffie.
(He has his ears back and he's howling because my boyfriend blew on his ears to wind him up! Buster then proceeded to pin him down and cuddle him. :cool:)

He hates cats. But he will greet you by bounding up to you and trying to pin you down and just lick you all over, tail wagging and the whole lot.

Asides from the cat issue - not an aggressive bone in his fat body!

I wouldn't like a staffie myself, but I would definitely recommend one, with good training and leadership, they can become wonderful dogs (although this one is terribly spoiled!)
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MrsCrackFox
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Magical Moogles)
I second what Emaemmaemily said. You need to be quite careful with staffys as they can have an aggressive nature, its sort of what they were bred for. Some are really lovely, but I've witnessed some really nasty ones as well. The fact that it's a rescue dog as well, might give it other problems you might not be prepared for.

A staffy attacked my dog at the park years ago, he ran away and suffered from some nasty injuries. He became really scared with other dogs afterwards. What makes it even more disastrous, is the owner actually released it on our dog, and was laughing, when it was attacking us! I get scared a bit now when I see one and always try to avoid.
I agree! Staffys can be quite unpredicable too. My dog was attacked by 2 staffys once, it's really horrible because you don't reall know what to do. :| I can't believe the owner was laughing though, disgusting. I would have reported the *******!
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death.drop
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#29
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#29
(Original post by 1.2.3.)
Thanks for your help everyone!

after looking at rescue dogs, we will probably be getting a staffy, theyre such happy little dogs
that's great, there are so many of them and the vast majority are brilliant dogs.

I've looked after several for my local rescue (I foster) and they were all lovely. I was incredibly tempted to keep the last one he was such a soppy thing, and incredibly well trained from the moment we had him.

The only drawback with staffies is that you may find that people can have quite a negative attitude towards them which can be upsetting. Particularly when other dog owners try to avoid you when all your dog wants to do is say hello and have a sniff.

Rescues are very honest about the dogs nature and always test them with other dogs so they can find them the right home and reduce the chances of a dog being returned to them.

Yes, staffies were originally bred for fighting but they have come a long way and how you see it in most of them is just that they like to play fight by rolling around and growling.
There are 37 staffies and staff crosses at the rescue I work with at the moment and only two of those aren't good with other dogs.
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death.drop
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#30
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#30
(Original post by MrsCrackFox)
I agree! Staffys can be quite unpredicable too. My dog was attacked by 2 staffys once, it's really horrible because you don't reall know what to do. :| I can't believe the owner was laughing though, disgusting. I would have reported the *******!
the problem there is clearly the owner though, not the dogs.


Just wanted to mention that my last foster staffy was attacked by 2 tiny jack russels when I had him and was so terrified he was trying to jump in to my arms. Born to fight, right? :rolleyes:
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MrsCrackFox
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#31
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#31
(Original post by death.drop)
the problem there is clearly the owner though, not the dogs.


Just wanted to mention that my last foster staffy was attacked by 2 tiny jack russels when I had him and was so terrified he was trying to jump in to my arms. Born to fight, right? :rolleyes:
Well the owner of the staffy I encountered was a nice woman.
Not all staffys are aggressive, some are very sweet, friendly and almost dopey.
But you should still be careful, especially if getting one from a rescue centre, as you don't really know what the owners can be like.
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Racheld25
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#32
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#32
http://www.channel4.com/programmes/h...uy-a-puppy/4od

Not watched it, but should imagine it covers the basics
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ScottishShortiex
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#33
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#33
(Original post by MrsCrackFox)
If I were you, I'd get a dog breed book and flick through it.
Or just look online, what may seem like a suitable first time dog for some may not be suitable for others.
For example, one may be more suitable to city life with quick walks in the morning whereas others are more suited to long countryside walks, some dogs like larger families and children, whereas others get distressed easily and prefer a calm environment. Some demand attention all the time and some are happy keeping themselves to themselves and tend to sleep a lot.
Having said that, if you are a typical suburban family. Then I suggest a cocker spaniel. Very easy to look after, a little daily walk will suit them fine, they like to have attention, get on with children but aren't too demanding (unlike whippets!) they are happy snoozing in their basket and aren't fussy eaters.
And they are so loving and sweet!

(adult)

...And their puppies are the most adorable little things. :love:

OMG...did you just steal my dog ? :p: This picture is the absolute double of our black cocker spaniel who's nearly 4 I'm in shock at how alike they are!! :eek:

Anyway OP...Cocker spaniels are fantastic dogs, they are smart and are great with all the family (especially children). BEWARE: They know how to look really cute and can manipulate you into getting their own way :p: I highly recommend! :yes:

Our first dog was a Golden Retriever who my mum got when she was 9 months. She was also a really good dog, and brilliant with kids too but can't remember much else. They're good, especially if you want a larger dog
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death.drop
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#34
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#34
(Original post by MrsCrackFox)
Well the owner of the staffy I encountered was a nice woman.
Not all staffys are aggressive, some are very sweet, friendly and almost dopey.
But you should still be careful, especially if getting one from a rescue centre, as you don't really know what the owners can be like.
you said she laughed when the dogs attacked yours

you should be careful with any breed of dog.
If you have it from a puppy it's your job to find a good breeder who breeds for temperament and take the time to socialise and train it properly.
If getting from a rescue center, you can be safe in the knowledge that they test their dogs so it's very unusual to be told a dog is fine with other dogs if it isn't.

I've had 2 dog-aggressive dogs in my time as a fosterer, one was a golden retriever and one was a collie. I also adopted a dog aggressive dog (we worked on it and the problem went away) who was a lab x whippet. I've had loads of staffs who have all been fine.
It's really stupid to judge a dog by the breed that it is over it's personality when it comes to rescue, not only because you could overlook some great dogs but because you could assume a dog is going to be perfect and it isn't.
You should ALWAYS be careful, and always judge each dog as an individual.
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Charlski
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#35
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I have two fab rescue Saluki x Greyhound lurchers. They're incredibly good tempered, very friendly and very gentle - something I've experienced in all sighthounds I've had anything to do with.

If I were you, for a first dog I'd definitely go for something Greyhound-ish as they really aren't at all demanding, and are very easy to have around the house - my two would sleep all day if I let them!

Just make sure that whatever you get will fit in with your lifestyle - some breeds make dreadful pets for some people whilst being another person's perfect pet - this applies particularly to those dogs bred to work, such as Collies, Spaniels and even Labs.

Whatever you get, I'd definitely, definitely go for a rescue - I was a bit wary of rescues before I got my two - dreading that something awful might surface when we got them home, but the worst we've had is a bit of separation anxiety from one, which is now getting much better and a fear of strange dogs in the other (understandable, as she has scars which would indicate being kept with another dog which was highly aggresive towards her) which, again, is now vastly improved. Otherwise they're aazing, and take everything into their stride - including my five year old nephew trying to ride them!
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MrsCrackFox
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#36
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#36
(Original post by ScottishShortiex)
OMG...did you just steal my dog ? :p: This picture is the absolute double of our black cocker spaniel who's nearly 4 I'm in shock at how alike they are!! :eek:

Anyway OP...Cocker spaniels are fantastic dogs, they are smart and are great with all the family (especially children). BEWARE: They know how to look really cute and can manipulate you into getting their own way :p: I highly recommend! :yes:

Our first dog was a Golden Retriever who my mum got when she was 9 months. She was also a really good dog, and brilliant with kids too but can't remember much else. They're good, especially if you want a larger dog
Aaaw, I envy you! I wish I still had one, they have to be one of my favourite breeds of dog.
So loving and loyal. And I have never seen a cuter puppy. :yep:

When your dog has her food, d'you have to tie her ears up? We used to always tie our cocker's ears up loosely in a bobble because they would always go in her food. She'd look so cute!
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MrsCrackFox
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#37
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#37
(Original post by death.drop)
you said she laughed when the dogs attacked yours

you should be careful with any breed of dog.
If you have it from a puppy it's your job to find a good breeder who breeds for temperament and take the time to socialise and train it properly.
If getting from a rescue center, you can be safe in the knowledge that they test their dogs so it's very unusual to be told a dog is fine with other dogs if it isn't.

I've had 2 dog-aggressive dogs in my time as a fosterer, one was a golden retriever and one was a collie. I also adopted a dog aggressive dog (we worked on it and the problem went away) who was a lab x whippet. I've had loads of staffs who have all been fine.
It's really stupid to judge a dog by the breed that it is over it's personality when it comes to rescue, not only because you could overlook some great dogs but because you could assume a dog is going to be perfect and it isn't.
You should ALWAYS be careful, and always judge each dog as an individual.
No I actually I never said...
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death.drop
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#38
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(Original post by MrsCrackFox)
No I actually I never said...
ah sorry, when you said "My dog was attacked by 2 staffys once, it's really horrible because you don't reall know what to do. :| I can't believe the owner was laughing though, disgusting." I got a bit mixed up and didn't realise you were referring to someone else.

Either way, if the dog was bought from a pup it's the owners fault for not going to a good breeder and socialising the dog. They don't just turn out bad for no reason.
If from a rescue then the owner should have known the dogs weren't good with others and they should have had them suitably restrained.
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11random
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#39
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All dogs need proper training and socialising so they are friendly, happy and will not cause you any problems.

As a first time owner I would probably advise you to stay away from breeds like rottwielers, dobermans and staffeys as they have a natural aggressiveness in them.

I would say something like a golden retriever makes perfect family dogs or solo dogs, and they have a happy temper.
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Lylat
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#40
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We had a German Shepherd from a police dog breeding centre (he wasn't suitable to be a police dog) so we bought him.

Heres some pictures:


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