What A Levels for Medicine? Watch

Huw Davies
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#21
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#21
(Original post by ser00)
ohhh dear...what about for oxbridge do they mind if you dont have any variety??
No, as long as you meet the stated requirements.
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wer343lit
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#22
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#22
(Original post by ser00)
I want to study medicine but I'm not sure what A Levels I need. I've heard unis want a humanity or something as well as biology, chemistry and maths but everyone keeps saying different things!!

I was thinking of doing biology, chemistry, maths, further maths and economics, but I don't know whether I should do physics instead of economics, or would that just be too sciency?
Do Biology and Chemistry.

Then do 2 other subjects that you enjoy and are good at. It does not matter what those subjects are.

You'll get a huge amount of false information on here. Some people will be adamant that as much science as possible is the best, and some will tell you that universities want a humanity for "variety". Both are wrong. It simply doesn't matter.
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wer343lit
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Renal)
They do? Many people I know who assess these things don't give a flying ****, those that have an opinion tend to want interesting people and not more ****ing science drones, most schools state (where there is a policy) that they prefer variety.
How on earth does having a variety of subjects prove you are an "interesting person"?

I'm fairly sure that's what interviews are for, not subject choices.
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Taffy Duck
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#24
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#24
If you're looking for an application advantage based on your choice o subjects - sorry, you won't find it.

Academic achievements are more of a minimum requirement for getting into medicine than a way to stand out.

If you do choose maths, do it because you enjoy it, or do it because it'll be useful down the line. Don't look to guess what. you think the admissions tutors want.
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Renal
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Jonty99)
How on earth does having a variety of subjects prove you are an "interesting person"?

I'm fairly sure that's what interviews are for, not subject choices.
It doesn't. But the people I know who do admissions have, generally, expressed an opinion that they prefer people who have not done four science A-Levels because they are "boring".
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radmuffin
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#26
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#26
(Original post by ser00)
I want to study medicine but I'm not sure what A Levels I need. I've heard unis want a humanity or something as well as biology, chemistry and maths but everyone keeps saying different things!!

I was thinking of doing biology, chemistry, maths, further maths and economics, but I don't know whether I should do physics instead of economics, or would that just be too sciency?
You require A2 Chemistry and AS Biology, although AS Biology is preferred. A few colleges in Cambridge want maths, I believe, but apart from that you can pick any subjects you want (as long as they're 'strong.') My friend got in with Biology, Chemistry and English at A2; and I have two interviews with Biology; Chemistry; and French at A2.

To be frank, as long as you have 'strong' subjects (and Chemistry & Biology), admissions won't give your A Level choices a second look - they honestly don't care, and will never choose one person over the other due to A Level choices.

As long as your subjects meet the minimum requirements that the universities look for (on their websites), you're fine.
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jimbo139
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#27
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the only essentials are biology and chemistry. Apart from that you can do what you like, although if you pick non-challenging subjects they may conclude that you aren't very academic.

I did physics & ancient history, but in retrospect maths (statistics) might have been more useful than physics.
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Taffy Duck
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#28
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Everyone i've spoken to in admissions has said that choice of a-levels are generally only a minor consideration in the application process beyond box-ticking. Whether the extra subjects are sciences or humanities is irrelevant. Whether or not a candidate is 'interesting' is something they assess from interview and/or PS.
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wer343lit
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Renal)
It doesn't. But the people I know who do admissions have, generally, expressed an opinion that they prefer people who have not done four science A-Levels because they are "boring".
Wow, that seems incredibly unfair.

How on earth can they attempt to judge someone's personality based on their subject choices? Liking English doesn't make someone less boring than liking Physics.
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Unbiased Opinion
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#30
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If you enjoy and it and your school offers it I'd recommend Philosophy and Ethics (RE Edexcel)... the second unit is medical ethics investigation topic so you research into an area of medical ethics that you find interesting. I've been looking into consent... it's quite fun and I imagine it'll be really useful for interview prep.

BUT don't take it unless you enjoy RE because unit 1 was all philosophy of religion/ethics stuff and A2 is also that type of jazz.
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Renal
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Jonty99)
Wow, that seems incredibly unfair.

How on earth can they attempt to judge someone's personality based on their subject choices? Liking English doesn't make someone less boring than liking Physics.
Of course it's a generalisation, probably a fair bit of truth in it.
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wer343lit
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#32
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#32
(Original post by Renal)
Of course it's a generalisation, probably a fair bit of truth in it.
It just seems so bizarre to me though.

They have the person's personal statement, and they can interview them.

Why would they even need to make an unfair generalisation about how "interesting" they are based on subject choice?
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Ataloss
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#33
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#33
The new A level medicine course will be essential starting from next year.
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Renal
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Jonty99)
It just seems so bizarre to me though.

They have the person's personal statement, and they can interview them.

Why would they even need to make an unfair generalisation about how "interesting" they are based on subject choice?
What would be bizarre is if we didn't talk about applicants, do you think we're uninterested in the people who're joining the profession? Do you think we want to see medical schools fill up with thousands of 18 year-olds with A*s in biology, chemistry and maths who've only stopped studying long enough to get a token amount of shadowing a GP's receptionist?
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wer343lit
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#35
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#35
(Original post by Renal)
Do you think we want to see medical schools fill up with thousands of 18 year-olds with A*s in biology, chemistry and maths who've only stopped studying long enough to get a token amount of shadowing a GP's receptionist?
Not at all, which if why, if you read my previous post, I said medical schools should be using interviews and personal statement, rather than subject choice, to make judgements on the character of the medical applicant.

I fail to see how using subject choices will tell you how much work experience an applicant has done, so I'm not sure what point you are trying to make here.
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Taffy Duck
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#36
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Renal, having a mixture of a-levels is a non-factor when applying for medicine. Medical schools do not make assumptions on applicants' social skills or whether or not they're 'interesting' based on their choice of a-levels.

Individuals involved in the selection process may voice opinions one way or another regarding what they want from applicants (i've spoken to a few who think maths should be mandatory for example), but the application process is systematic. As a result, a-levels are treated objectively, while subjectivity is reserved for PS and interview.
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laura94
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#37
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#37
You're choices are fine
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Renal
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#38
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#38
(Original post by Taffy Duck)
Renal, having a mixture of a-levels is a non-factor when applying for medicine. Medical schools do not make assumptions on applicants' social skills or whether or not they're 'interesting' based on their choice of a-levels.

Individuals involved in the selection process may voice opinions one way or another regarding what they want from applicants (i've spoken to a few who think maths should be mandatory for example), but the application process is systematic. As a result, a-levels are treated objectively, while subjectivity is reserved for PS and interview.
Thank you for reminding me, it's been a few years... :shifty:
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Renal
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#39
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#39
(Original post by Jonty99)
Not at all, which if why, if you read my previous post, I said medical schools should be using interviews and personal statement, rather than subject choice, to make judgements on the character of the medical applicant.

I fail to see how using subject choices will tell you how much work experience an applicant has done, so I'm not sure what point you are trying to make here.
The point I am trying to make is that many people I know who assess these things don't give a flying ****, those that have an opinion tend to want interesting people and not more ****ing science drones, most schools state, where there is a policy, that they prefer variety.
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Mr Inquisitive
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#40
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#40
Biology, Chemistry, x, y.

x & y being anything traditional (not that you even need y, three is sufficient).

with the exception of Further Mathematics; Medical Schools don't regard it as a separate A-Level to Maths.
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