Should organ donation be made compulsory with an oupt out option int the UK? Watch

sellasi6290
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#21
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#21
(Original post by History-Student)
New rule: if you don't agree to donate your organs when you die, you're not allowed other people's when you need one.

That'd up the donor rate I reckon.
however I pay tax which some goes to the NHS if i didn't want to donate organs and someone told me that I cant have an organ if i needed one then can I have my money back? Because the organ is the final step, do't the need money to car out these procedures?

bu loool anyway
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slacker07906
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#22
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NO. Just NO, I just dont believe in such a motion and would go against all my religiou beliefs.
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sellasi6290
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#23
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#23
(Original post by VaVe)
I believe it should be opt out. Maybe with an option so parents could choose to opt their children out at birth so that religious people had an easier time. It would save many lives and if people are too lazy to opt out then they obviously aren't too worried about it.
thats the me thing with the opt in

is it a problem of awareness do you think?
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sellasi6290
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#24
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#24
(Original post by slacker07906)
NO. Just NO, I just dont believe in such a motion and would go against all my religiou beliefs.
what are your religious beliefs
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ily_em
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#25
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#25
(Original post by VaVe)
I believe it should be opt out. Maybe with an option so parents could choose to opt their children out at birth so that religious people had an easier time. It would save many lives and if people are too lazy to opt out then they obviously aren't too worried about it.
No way. The child should be able to decide when they're an adult, not have it forced upon them...
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Munchies-YumYum
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#26
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#26
(Original post by TomInce6666)
And if you really didnt want to you wouldnt do it?

What point are you making?
Why should it be "compulsory" if there is an option to or not to donate? I'm sorry but I don't understand the coherence of this argument.
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History-Student
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#27
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#27
(Original post by sellasi6290)
however I pay tax which some goes to the NHS if i didn't want to donate organs and someone told me that I cant have an organ if i needed one then can I have my money back? Because the organ is the final step, do't the need money to car out these procedures?

bu loool anyway
No you can't have your money back. It's a set price. You have a free and easy option to get extra value for your money in the form of free organs, if you choose not to take them up on this deal then that's your business.
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WelshBluebird
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#28
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Personally I think it should be. There is no real reason not to (unless its for religious reasons - and even that is BS IMO). Its not like you'll know any different after your dead, and you help another person stay alive.

(Original post by History-Student)
New rule: if you don't agree to donate your organs when you die, you're not allowed other people's when you need one.

That'd up the donor rate I reckon.
Agreed.
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sellasi6290
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#29
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(Original post by TomInce6666)
And if you really didnt want to you wouldnt do it?

What point are you making?

opt in: people say they will but do no, therefore you do not want to because if you really wanted to do it you would have thought about that poor little girl who needs a kidney and went to become a organ donor.

Why should the rest of the country suffer for something that one person should have just went and done, plus i dont ink the opt out thing is going to be easy, how easy is it to steal money from charity? this is basically the same thing
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girlwithsharpteeth
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#30
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I have just done an essay on this for my English discursive assignment lol.

A lot of people point out Spain as a shining example of the "opt out" option working wonders but what they don't say is that it's impossible to prove that it was the change to the law that caused the increase in donation rates. It was actually a decade after they changed the legislation to an opt out system before donation rates improved and that was AFTER they changed other things (e.g. employing more specialised staff and setting up a 24 hour donation task force) - even the guy in charge of Spain donation system says that he believes it was these changes and NOT changing to an opt out system that improved donation.

This is just one of the big points I would say.

If you have a look at any survey on organ donation, there is always a much higher rate of people for donation than are actually signed up to it. BUT in countried with opt out systems that still give relatives the final veto, the number of people who say they are for donation is also much higher than the percentage of relatives who agree to having their loved one offered as a donor. The reason for this is, it doesn't matter how much you try to rationalise it, it is an incredibly difficult decision to make - not least because the donor often has to be alive while the organs are harvested I believe (even if brain dead). The reality when you are faced with it is very different to facing it in the hospital.
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Drunk Punx
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Guru Jason)
What about all the smokers and the heavy drinkers and the drug abusers. hate to be the one who needs there liver, heart etc. Thats one good reason not to introduce it.
Does anyone have anything to say about this point?

I would imagine that the organs would be "inspected" before being used for transplants.
But it could also create a hell of a lot of paperwork.
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sellasi6290
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#32
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#32
(Original post by History-Student)
No you can't have your money back. It's a set price. You have a free and easy option to get extra value for your money in the form of free organs, if you choose not to take them up on this deal then that's your business.
did I not pay a set price to receive that organ or my money doesn't cover that?
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InsaneFandom
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#33
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#33
I'm all for it, plenty of people don't care what happens to their organs once they die and don't bother registering to be an organ doner. As long as people are made aware of it and opting out is a fairly straightforward process I don't see why not.
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Shuvel
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#34
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#34
Bar religion and the emotional distress for certain organs like someone feeling uncomfortable that someone would be using their eyes, I don't think there is really a good arguement..

"Oh sorry sir, the car crash has critically damaged some of your internal organs and we have several hundred matches from recently deceased persons....but no-one opted in for organ donation so...yeah...enjoy your last few painful hours."
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sellasi6290
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#35
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#35
(Original post by girlwithsharpteeth)
I have just done an essay on this for my English discursive assignment lol.

A lot of people point out Spain as a shining example of the "opt out" option working wonders but what they don't say is that it's impossible to prove that it was the change to the law that caused the increase in donation rates. It was actually a decade after they changed the legislation to an opt out system before donation rates improved and that was AFTER they changed other things (e.g. employing more specialised staff and setting up a 24 hour donation task force) - even the guy in charge of Spain donation system says that he believes it was these changes and NOT changing to an opt out system that improved donation.

This is just one of the big points I would say.
brilliant!
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TomInce6666
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#36
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#36
(Original post by Munchies-YumYum)
Why should it be "compulsory" if there is an option to or not to donate? I'm sorry but I don't understand the coherence of this argument.
Think im not making myself clear there. Its not compulsory to donate in an opt out system, its optional to make a choice, however that choice is made for you if you do not make that choice.
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Guru Jason
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#37
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#37
(Original post by Drunk Punx)
Does anyone have anything to say about this point?

I would imagine that the organs would be "inspected" before being used for transplants.
But it could also create a hell of a lot of paperwork.

yes but those that have used drugs, drink and smoke must total a large percentage of the population. wouldn't it create too much hassle if this is the case?
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VaVe
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#38
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#38
(Original post by ily_em)
No way. The child should be able to decide when they're an adult, not have it forced upon them...
Obviously they'd be able to opt back in, when they're an adult. Maybe a notice sent when they are 16 (along with their national insurance number, saves paperwork) saying 'you are currently opting out, if you want to continue to opt out call this number'
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Munchies-YumYum
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#39
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(Original post by Drunk Punx)
Does anyone have anything to say about this point?

I would imagine that the organs would be "inspected" before being used for transplants.
But it could also create a hell of a lot of paperwork.
Only healthy organs are used in organ transplantations.
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Laura2602
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#40
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#40
(Original post by sellasi6290)
but don't youhink the same thing will happen again, like right now those who can't be bothered to opt in dont, but this time it's a serious thing were those who don't opt out or have the means to opt out get their organs taken away despite of family objection just because they were as lazy as the people who claimed tht they wanted to opt in but somehow didnt have the time?
Not wanting to sound too harsh but if that's the case then it's their tough luck, they will have had plenty of time to do something about it, whereas how it is now, if someone doesn't get round to registering it's the patients that suffer not the potential donor.

If somebody is against something they are more likely to do something about it than someone who wants to register but never gets round to it.
Thats my opinion anyway, I know not everyone will agree
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