Negative aspects of Edinburgh University? Watch

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stargirl2012
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#21
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#21
(Original post by jemrock)
Too late...I've firmed it :L Let the consequences fall where they may...but I'm doing English lit and classics - I've heard the classics in particular is great at Edinburgh
My boyfriend does that at Edinburgh, PM me if you have any questions x
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oxymoronic
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#22
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(Original post by problemsolver)
You might think "Edinburgh has more to experience", but if you're quiet there's a good chance you won't take that opportunity (I don't honestly know whether there is that opportunity anyway), and all you'll be left with is a harder time getting good grades, at a bigger, less warm university.
And you know that because?

I'm sure you can look up the drop out rates for courses yourself, but I know lots of quiet people who dropped out of or were asked to leave Edinburgh for poor grades.
Yes, because the university do sit around going "yeah, this guy only contributed twice in tutorials last week.... he definitely should be failing the course" as that IS how they make decisions on students. In most subjects, assessment is exam or essay based. No amount of talking is going to help you to get a good mark on something like that as its about your knowledge and understanding of the subject coupled with your reflections, I'm not overly sure how you can equate being quiet to getting low grades. You could coincidentally be a quiet person and also fail courses which resulted in you being asked to leave the course in the same way an overly extrovert person might also get asked to leave the course, but the two are in no way connected.

To be honest, your assertions are pretty insulting and judgemental in terms of the abilities or potential of someone who happens to be naturally quieter or more shy than other people. Why would someone not take opportunities available to them at university purely because they're quiet? Or why would they be more likely to be asked to leave a course because they're quiet? That makes zero sense.

I grew up in a tiny village in the middle of the Peak District which is where I lived until I was 18 and I'm probably on the more reserved side of the scale. By your logic I must have hated Edinburgh because I didn't take up any of the things that were offered to me during my time there. I certainly wouldn't have been able to get a degree from there due to my lack of intelligence as a result of being quiet, right?
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problemsolver
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#23
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(Original post by oxymoronic)
And you know that because?



Yes, because the university do sit around going "yeah, this guy only contributed twice in tutorials last week.... he definitely should be failing the course" as that IS how they make decisions on students. In most subjects, assessment is exam or essay based. No amount of talking is going to help you to get a good mark on something like that as its about your knowledge and understanding of the subject coupled with your reflections, I'm not overly sure how you can equate being quiet to getting low grades. You could coincidentally be a quiet person and also fail courses which resulted in you being asked to leave the course in the same way an overly extrovert person might also get asked to leave the course, but the two are in no way connected.

To be honest, your assertions are pretty insulting and judgemental in terms of the abilities or potential of someone who happens to be naturally quieter or more shy than other people. Why would someone not take opportunities available to them at university purely because they're quiet? Or why would they be more likely to be asked to leave a course because they're quiet? That makes zero sense.

I grew up in a tiny village in the middle of the Peak District which is where I lived until I was 18 and I'm probably on the more reserved side of the scale. By your logic I must have hated Edinburgh because I didn't take up any of the things that were offered to me during my time there. I certainly wouldn't have been able to get a degree from there due to my lack of intelligence as a result of being quiet, right?
umad?

I have attended Edinburgh university.

Anyway, these quiet people were unhappy in Edinburgh, so they found it harder to concentrate on/care about their studies. In some courses, marks are taken off for not attending tutorials, and in some cases these people had poor attendance. Some had difficulty organising themselves in the big university to get to the right place for exams on time, and if you don't sit the exam, you get no credit.

I'm not saying they were stupid just because they were quiet. As I said in my other post, doing well in uni isn't all about how clever you are and how well you know your subject. I agree it's 100% exam based in many cases, but exams aren't 100% cleverness/ability/knowledge based. I do better in a quieter environment, which is why in secondary school my grades went up from 40% in most exams to 90-100% in most exams when I was moved from a massive school which I hated to a smaller one.
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nearlyheadlessian
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#24
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#24
(Original post by problemsolver)
Anyway, these quiet people were unhappy in Edinburgh
People are unhappy everywhere - Edinburgh doesn't have a particular knack of making more (or fewer) people unhappy.

(Original post by problemsolver)
In some courses, marks are taken off for not attending tutorials,
That's because you're supposed to attend.

(Original post by problemsolver)
and in some cases these people had poor attendance.
Not the university's fault.

(Original post by problemsolver)
Some had difficulty organising themselves in the big university to get to the right place for exams on time, and if you don't sit the exam, you get no credit.
Sorry, but that's nothing to do with the city or the university, that just disorganisation.

(Original post by problemsolver)
I'm not saying they were stupid just because they were quiet.
I'm prepared to say they're stupid. Anyone who can't get to an all-or-nothing exam, the date and venue of which are published months in advance, is stupid.

(Original post by problemsolver)
a bigger, less warm university
I have an excellent degree from Edinburgh thanks to a small, warm department.

(Original post by problemsolver)
I know lots of quiet people who dropped out of or were asked to leave Edinburgh for poor grades.
By poor grades, what you surely mean is multiple fails.

(Original post by problemsolver)
Some have assessed presentations, some don't. Sure it might be good for you to try and get better at communicating, but if you're not that good, you don't really want to have assessed presentations which could drag your degree grade down.
Complete *******s.

I'm afraid if you're not cut out for university education, then you should not be there.
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problemsolver
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#25
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#25
(Original post by nearlyheadlessian)
...
Fair enough I wasn't saying the uni is bad (or I didn't mean to). I'm sure that for lots of people it's great. Already a number of people in this thread have been ready to defend it, and said they like it. Obviously lots of people graduate with firsts every year, and have had a good, productive time. It's probably a good place for people who want to meet lots of new people and try a variety of new things as it's quite a big uni, and I'm sure there are other advantages.

It's just that for others, it might not be suited to them. For some people, exams and understanding their academic subject are easy, but organisation, communication and other stuff is more difficult (or just too uninteresting to want to work on). Of course it makes sense that they'd probably do better at a smaller uni where they'll know which building and room is which within months, and on a course where they won't be assessed for communication.

It's just playing to your strengths. Maybe in your opinion, finding it hard to communicate and be around people or finding it hard to organise yourself make you "stupid", and undeserving of a degree or being at uni (I don't know if that's what you think), but if these people can find a uni and course more suited to their needs where they can get a good degree, why shouldn't they go for it?

Also, "multiple fails" can be two fails: one in a main diet exam, one in a resit, and often on an "outside course" which you don't care about and which isn't related to the degree subject you applied for.

And "Edinburgh doesn't have a particular knack for making more (or fewer) people unhappy". Maybe not, and I agree that this isn't something which I can say marks Edinburgh down overall in comparison to other places. But it probably is the case that Edinburgh would make a quiet, withdrawn person who doesn't like crowds or people more unhappy than, say, St Andrews would. Just as an extovert might be happier in Edinburgh than St Andrews.
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oxymoronic
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#26
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(Original post by problemsolver)
x
I get the impression that you're going at this from your personal experience, but generalising isn't helpful to other people.
Again, I find it pretty insulting that you're insinuating that purely because I'm a quieter person I would definitely have struggled at Edinburgh. I didn't and I loved Edinburgh. Despite being quiet, I managed to do things like attend tutorials, sit exams and get a good degree despite my apparent unsuitability to being a student at Edinburgh. I know lots of people in the same position and I think its dangerous to paint stereotypes on TSR which certainly are not true because a lot of applicants read TSR and change their opinions because of what they read on here. I'd have hated to have read what you've got to say when I was applying because I loved Edinburgh so much yet you're implying that I wouldn't fit in there.

I honestly fail to understand your argument that someone who is quiet might struggle to find an exam room. That makes zero sense. I also fail to understand how you can blame someone's disorganisation on the university they chose to attend or say its excusable in someone who is shy. It isn't difficult to find an exam venue and ensure you turn up at the right time. Even if you do manage to go to a small town university where your bedroom, lecture hall, library and everything is neatly located in the same room so you can't lose it there will be a time once you've graduated where you do have to do something like find a location to attend at a particular time. If someone aged 21/22 is unable to do that then I'd honestly say its a failing that they need to sort out as that isn't just something you can apologise for with "ah well I'm a shy person so finding locations is really hard for me meaning I missed that really important meeting/exam".

Similarly, at most universities on most courses there will be some kind of compulsory tutorial thing. That's just part and parcel of going to university. With regards to presentations, it will entirely depend on the degree as I never had to do a presentation at any point during my four years at Edinburgh and I'm not aware of ever having had a conversation with someone who had to do a presentation. Everything I've ever come across has been totally exam or essay based.

I totally agree with you that Edinburgh isn't for everyone and St Andrews isn't either - I would have hated going there. However, saying that people will struggle and probably end up failing their degree if they go to Edinburgh purely because they're shy or quiet is ridiculous. This is the part of your argument to which I object.
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problemsolver
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#27
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#27
(Original post by oxymoronic)
I get the impression that you're going at this from your personal experience, but generalising isn't helpful to other people.
Again, I find it pretty insulting that you're insinuating that purely because I'm a quieter person I would definitely have struggled at Edinburgh. I didn't and I loved Edinburgh. Despite being quiet, I managed to do things like attend tutorials, sit exams and get a good degree despite my apparent unsuitability to being a student at Edinburgh. I know lots of people in the same position and I think its dangerous to paint stereotypes on TSR which certainly are not true because a lot of applicants read TSR and change their opinions because of what they read on here. I'd have hated to have read what you've got to say when I was applying because I loved Edinburgh so much yet you're implying that I wouldn't fit in there.

I honestly fail to understand your argument that someone who is quiet might struggle to find an exam room. That makes zero sense. I also fail to understand how you can blame someone's disorganisation on the university they chose to attend or say its excusable in someone who is shy. It isn't difficult to find an exam venue and ensure you turn up at the right time. Even if you do manage to go to a small town university where your bedroom, lecture hall, library and everything is neatly located in the same room so you can't lose it there will be a time once you've graduated where you do have to do something like find a location to attend at a particular time. If someone aged 21/22 is unable to do that then I'd honestly say its a failing that they need to sort out as that isn't just something you can apologise for with "ah well I'm a shy person so finding locations is really hard for me meaning I missed that really important meeting/exam".

Similarly, at most universities on most courses there will be some kind of compulsory tutorial thing. That's just part and parcel of going to university. With regards to presentations, it will entirely depend on the degree as I never had to do a presentation at any point during my four years at Edinburgh and I'm not aware of ever having had a conversation with someone who had to do a presentation. Everything I've ever come across has been totally exam or essay based.

I totally agree with you that Edinburgh isn't for everyone and St Andrews isn't either - I would have hated going there. However, saying that people will struggle and probably end up failing their degree if they go to Edinburgh purely because they're shy or quiet is ridiculous. This is the part of your argument to which I object.

ok bro you're a moderator i'm sure you can delete my posts if you want to
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ch0llima
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#28
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#28
As someone who studied at St Andrews for two years and is Edinburgh born-and-bred, I'm here to provide some perspective on both if asked. Just quote me and I'll see what I can do

(Original post by Imprimatur)
What makes Edinburgh a "stressful city"? And it isn't that busy at all, except during the summer months because of all the festivals.
Trust me, Edinburgh is hugely stressful. I've lived here my entire life and it has definitely got worse over the past ten years or so in terms of transportation and living costs. Something has definitely changed here and not in a good way, it's like the city has lost its soul and become very generic and bland.

I should also add that the festivals are a gimmick for tourists, and that most locals disregard them for the most part and go about their daily lives as normal. The sound of cash registers is the main benefit really
oxymoronic
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#29
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#29
(Original post by problemsolver)
ok bro you're a moderator i'm sure you can delete my posts if you want to
Yeah I can... but what's that got to do with anything?

Mods don't just go around removing posts they disagree y'know, we remove stuff that's against the site rules.
There's about 80 of us in total so if we went around removing stuff that we personally disagreed with purely because we can then I guess between all of our opinions, there wouldn't be much left of TSR!
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problemsolver
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(Original post by oxymoronic)
Yeah I can... but what's that got to do with anything?

Mods don't just go around removing posts they disagree y'know, we remove stuff that's against the site rules.
There's about 80 of us in total so if we went around removing stuff that we personally disagreed with purely because we can then I guess between all of our opinions, there wouldn't be much left of TSR!
You said that my posts were "unfairly generalizing" and "not helpful to other people", or something along those lines. Your concern is that people like you, who were quiet but liked edinburgh, might read my posts and decide not to apply, missing out on a good thing. If you deleted my posts, this would be unlikely to happen. If you can justify the feeling that my posts make TSR a less useful resource to other students, wouldn't you be allowed to delete them? Even if they aren't strictly against site rules? Not that I'm encouraging you to delete them. I don't mind too much either way.
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Static.
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#31
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#31
(Original post by problemsolver)
umad?

I have attended Edinburgh university.

Anyway, these quiet people were unhappy in Edinburgh, so they found it harder to concentrate on/care about their studies. In some courses, marks are taken off for not attending tutorials, and in some cases these people had poor attendance. Some had difficulty organising themselves in the big university to get to the right place for exams on time, and if you don't sit the exam, you get no credit.

I'm not saying they were stupid just because they were quiet. As I said in my other post, doing well in uni isn't all about how clever you are and how well you know your subject. I agree it's 100% exam based in many cases, but exams aren't 100% cleverness/ability/knowledge based. I do better in a quieter environment, which is why in secondary school my grades went up from 40% in most exams to 90-100% in most exams when I was moved from a massive school which I hated to a smaller one.
Y'know, I was really shy when I started uni and I'm hardly a massive extrovert now, but not every 'quiet' person at Edinburgh is automatically going to have a bad time. Some people might engage and get more confident, become better at public speaking or giving presentations, as I did. And I love the city itself, never found it stressful, despite coming from a small village.

If you're a really quiet, withdrawn person who finds it really difficult to integrate or has social anxiety or whatever, then whichever uni you go, it's going to be hard, you have to do tutorials and presentations everywhere. Edinburgh isn't particularly at fault. It's also good to keep in mind the fact that improving your speaking/social skills is going to be useful in job interviews and working in general, so I think it's a good thing uni makes you do these things...
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ch0llima
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#32
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#32
I'll also add that Edinburgh is one of those places where it's easy to fade into the background, be anonymous and do normal things among the local population. It is a normal, functioning city as opposed to a contrived and generic student bubble. St Andrews has an obvious student stench and it's a case of "sore thumb" when you're a student there.

My point is that if you're socially anxious, nobody need ever know.
GrantMac
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#33
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#33
(Original post by problemsolver)
Well you've firmed your offer now but if someone else has this choice to make ... I'd say if you've gone to a quieter school and are quiet yourself, maybe St Andrews would be better.

It's probably smaller and you might feel more like you matter there.

Edinburgh is a busy, stressful city.

You might think "Edinburgh has more to experience", but if you're quiet there's a good chance you won't take that opportunity (I don't honestly know whether there is that opportunity anyway), and all you'll be left with is a harder time getting good grades, at a bigger, less warm university.

I'm sure you can look up the drop out rates for courses yourself, but I know lots of quiet people who dropped out of or were asked to leave Edinburgh for poor grades.

Maybe look at what the courses involve at the unis too. Some have assessed presentations, some don't. Sure it might be good for you to try and get better at communicating, but if you're not that good, you don't really want to have assessed presentations which could drag your degree grade down. It's not purely about how clever you are or how good you are at the subject at a lot of unis.
I don't know what's stressful about Edinburgh. It's busy on Princes Street and during the festival but it's nothing like London and festival business is hardly stressful. It's a beautiful city with a lovely mix of being in a capital, accompanied by large green spaces.

I'm quiet and once I got past freshers week I adored my time at Edinburgh and don't know anyone who dropped out. I don't know if I know anyone who didn't love at least the city side of their time.

(Original post by ch0llima)
As someone who studied at St Andrews for two years and is Edinburgh born-and-bred, I'm here to provide some perspective on both if asked. Just quote me and I'll see what I can do



Trust me, Edinburgh is hugely stressful. I've lived here my entire life and it has definitely got worse over the past ten years or so in terms of transportation and living costs. Something has definitely changed here and not in a good way, it's like the city has lost its soul and become very generic and bland.

I should also add that the festivals are a gimmick for tourists, and that most locals disregard them for the most part and go about their daily lives as normal. The sound of cash registers is the main benefit really

I don't see what's stressful. My days consisted of walking through the very unstressful meadows to a lecture, sitting in one of the many nice cafes reading and going to the library and occasionally to a museum or sitting in princes street gardens. I wasn't once stressed by the city. And the only time I used transport was to go to Ikea or play intra-mural football.

As for the festival, it's not really a gimmick. But you'd probably be only there for it if you particularly want to be since it's the summer holidays. I was normally visiting home or travelling during it.
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Chi019
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#34
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#34
(Original post by jemrock)
Hey

I hold an unconditional offers to both Edinburgh and St Andrews universities, and I'm struggling to make up my mind as the deadline draws ever nearer..

I was wondering if any students could share any of the negative aspects of their university experience with me to help get a balanced view of the uni?

Thanks so much
Edinburgh Not big on academic freedom with controversial subjects.
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oxymoronic
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#35
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(Original post by jus2sik)
do you get paid or just have absolutely no life , no offense
Mostly, mods volunteer their time although there are perks to the job as well..... we still manage to have quite a normal life though, contrary to popular belief! :p:

What I do on TSR strongly relates to my job - the reason I'm a teacher is because I'm interested in supporting young people and ensuring that access to education isn't dependent on their background, and that everyone has access to the correct information/help rather than it being purely through their school. This is also the reason why I do the work I do on TSR - it makes zero difference whether its on the internet or face to face. Essentially, I oversee the PS help and UCAS sections of TSR in terms of managing 200+ PS helpers and working with around 4000 applicants a year, plus liaising with UCAS and other stake holders in education for my role in the UCAS forums where during the results day period we work round the clock (quite literally) to ensure our applicants are getting the advice/support they deserve because a lot of people can't get it from school due to their teachers not really understanding UCAS. This year TSR completely took over from UCAS in terms of getting advice/information out on results day as the UCAS website crashed and no one could get through on the phones, so our official advisor team stepped in and delivered without our site crashing meaning we ended up all over the BBC and other news channels as we were based at the UCAS HQ for the day. If I were doing this in any other context than the internet, would you consider me to have no life? I doubt it.

As a result of the voluntary work I do on TSR I've got to work really closely with the policy people at UCAS, with various government representatives from the Department of Education and also with Student Finance England. I'm also addressing a conference in December with regards to TSR involvement in the higher education process and how we can train teachers to help their students more effectively - because I'm a teacher I have a direct route/influence in education tmeaning I'm more able to work with the Acumen (admin) team on matters like this because I work in it on a daily basis. There's quite a lot of mods who are teachers as like I say, doing this is so related to our reasons for being teachers - its just an extension of the job except we're volunteering.

The experiences I've had and people I've met through TSR are the sort of things are highly beneficial in terms of my career as I eventually want to move on from classroom teaching into educational policy and the work I do on TSR goes hand in hand with my career. So all in all, I don't think its a bad way to spend my time and I know that there's quite literally tens of thousands of people who have benefited from our support during the university application process and that's all that matters as I enjoy it..... even though applicants can be a massive massive pain, just like my kids at school! Its like bringing my day job home with me sometimes
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