30-year-old mum wants to study medicine Watch

katiej149
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#21
Report 7 years ago
#21
Hi

I don't know if there is a specific UKCAT thread, but if you look in the medicine subforum, it will probably be described in one of the other threads. But to give you a basic idea, it's a computer-based aptitude test that takes 2 hours. It's got 5 sections: abstract, verbal and quantitative reasoning and decision analysis which are scored out of 900, and a personality test bit at the end. It is for those applying to medical or dental school at a uni which has specified that they want applicants to take it. Leeds is one of these. There are a number of uni's which don't require UKCAT but I can't remember which ones they are (a quick look on google will tell you!).

Hope that helped!
0
reply
Renal
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#22
Report 7 years ago
#22
(Original post by flashnazia)
I realise that I am severely limiting myself but I can't uproot my family and Leeds is the easiest place to get to from the rural-ish place I live in - still half-hour train ride away on rickety half-hourly trains!
How long to Harrogate, Steeton, Huddersfield, Halifax, Wakefield, Pontefract and all the other places that school would send you to?
0
reply
Wangers
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#23
Report 7 years ago
#23
(Original post by Subcutaneous)
Hi,

Going to sound random but have you considered nursing? You work in health (obviously) and although it's not as heavy science based you still need a good grounding on anatomy and physiology, pharmacology etc - and you're dealing much mire heavily in the broader aspect of a patient. However it may be a more stable career, no reason to move around and you get a lot more financial support. Along with flexible hours-and with the average age of a student nurse 29, more of your peers are in a similar situation.

Obviously if medicine is THE dream- go for it and follow it! However if you want to work in healthcare in generally I would advise nursing as an alternative option with more benefits for someone in your position! (plus the pay when you graduate isn't half bad! )
With the greatest of respect, if you want to sell nursing, sell it because it is a different, but vital role - not because the candidate might not be able to do medicine. It shows very little respect to both your medical and nursing colleagues.
1
reply
Gizmo!
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#24
Report 7 years ago
#24
its got to be said, very few med applicants would have the balls to apply for nursing, so in that respect you are right.

but i suspect 30 year old mum has long got past the prestige seeking desire at least a decade ago.
0
reply
yamamotootsu
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#25
Report 7 years ago
#25
(Original post by Subcutaneous)
Hi,

Going to sound random but have you considered nursing? You work in health (obviously) and although it's not as heavy science based you still need a good grounding on anatomy and physiology, pharmacology etc - and you're dealing much mire heavily in the broader aspect of a patient. However it may be a more stable career, no reason to move around and you get a lot more financial support. Along with flexible hours-and with the average age of a student nurse 29, more of your peers are in a similar situation.

Obviously if medicine is THE dream- go for it and follow it! However if you want to work in healthcare in generally I would advise nursing as an alternative option with more benefits for someone in your position! (plus the pay when you graduate isn't half bad! )
This. I think Nursing would suit you better OP. But I won't stop you to pursue your 'dream' of studying Medicine.
0
reply
DarkSenrine
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#26
Report 7 years ago
#26
Why is your name "flashnazia"? :confused:
0
reply
Gizmo!
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#27
Report 7 years ago
#27
(Original post by yamamotootsu)
This. I think Nursing would suit you better OP. But I won't stop you to pursue your 'dream' of studying Medicine.
why?
0
reply
OrmondDrone
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#28
Report 7 years ago
#28
(Original post by flashnazia)
I realise that I am severely limiting myself but I can't uproot my family and Leeds is the easiest place to get to from the rural-ish place I live in - still half-hour train ride away on rickety half-hourly trains!
I think pursuing your dream is great and I know the oldest on my course is 38 and loving every minute of it, that said you do need to consider your flexibility. If you can only apply to one medical school because of where you live that will stack the odds against you - and Leeds is one of the less transparent schools in some senses as its not totally clear what they want from applicants as it rejects a lot without interview who meet everything they publish that they are looking for. Also, not all your years at medical school will be based in the medical school building itself - in clinical years (and possibly before depending on the nature of Leeds' course) you will be scattered about West Yorkshire on placements at hospitals and community locations.

The other thing to consider is when you qualify and apply for Foundation training. You can apply for special consideration for a particular Deanery because of family commitments but (a) there is no guarantee you'll get it, and (b) the Deanery is a wide geographical area - so you may be lucky enough to get allocated to the Yorkshire and Humber deanery for training (that covers Leeds) but get allocated to programmes that base you in Scarborough, Scunthorpe, Sheffield, Skipton etc. These rotations are usually 4 months long so its impractical to uproot a family but you are expected to go where you are allocated - there is no concession in allocation to the training programme for people with families (only in allocation to the deanery). Then you will face the same issues all over again when you apply for specialty training.

You may find positing on New Media Medicine helpful - they have a lot of matures going for medicine (many successfully) and they will be able to give you advice / information.
0
reply
yamamotootsu
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#29
Report 7 years ago
#29
(Original post by Gizmo!)
why?
Because she'll be a fantastic nurse but if she'd like to aim higher I'm not stopping her.
1
reply
Renal
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#30
Report 7 years ago
#30
(Original post by yamamotootsu)
Because she'll be a fantastic nurse but if she'd like to aim higher I'm not stopping her.
If this is the quality of recruitment for nursing...
1
reply
Gizmo!
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#31
Report 7 years ago
#31
(Original post by yamamotootsu)
Because she'll be a fantastic nurse but if she'd like to aim higher I'm not stopping her.
i was asking why you said nursing preferentially to medicine.
0
reply
yamamotootsu
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#32
Report 7 years ago
#32
(Original post by Gizmo!)
i was asking why you said nursing preferentially to medicine.
Nursing feels more family oriented job. It would suit her more.
0
reply
Renal
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#33
Report 7 years ago
#33
(Original post by yamamotootsu)
Nursing feels more family oriented job. It would suit her more.
More shifts with more unsociable hours (typically)? Less pay?
1
reply
Gizmo!
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#34
Report 7 years ago
#34
(Original post by yamamotootsu)
Nursing feels more family oriented job. It would suit her more.
ah, thats interesting. why is it more family oriented.

and whart are you comparing her to when you say shes family oriented?
0
reply
Zafda
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#35
Report 7 years ago
#35
you can do crash courses (sorta) into medicine, plenty of mainstream colleges which do them and then you get into medicine! plenty of people who did this who're in my year of medicine at liverpool, and also, the grads/older students are SO much more hard working than everyone else... so as long as you have the determination you can do it
0
reply
Wangers
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#36
Report 7 years ago
#36
(Original post by OrmondDrone)
I think pursuing your dream is great and I know the oldest on my course is 38 and loving every minute of it, that said you do need to consider your flexibility. If you can only apply to one medical school because of where you live that will stack the odds against you - and Leeds is one of the less transparent schools in some senses as its not totally clear what they want from applicants as it rejects a lot without interview who meet everything they publish that they are looking for. Also, not all your years at medical school will be based in the medical school building itself - in clinical years (and possibly before depending on the nature of Leeds' course) you will be scattered about West Yorkshire on placements at hospitals and community locations.

The other thing to consider is when you qualify and apply for Foundation training. You can apply for special consideration for a particular Deanery because of family commitments but (a) there is no guarantee you'll get it, and (b) the Deanery is a wide geographical area - so you may be lucky enough to get allocated to the Yorkshire and Humber deanery for training (that covers Leeds) but get allocated to programmes that base you in Scarborough, Scunthorpe, Sheffield, Skipton etc. These rotations are usually 4 months long so its impractical to uproot a family but you are expected to go where you are allocated - there is no concession in allocation to the training programme for people with families (only in allocation to the deanery). Then you will face the same issues all over again when you apply for specialty training.

You may find positing on New Media Medicine helpful - they have a lot of matures going for medicine (many successfully) and they will be able to give you advice / information.
And pray tell, what happens when she has to do nursing placements? Isn't it the same arguments why she shouldn't do nursing either? If every possible problem has to first be overcome, nobody would ever get round to doing anything.
0
reply
Bslforever
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#37
Report 7 years ago
#37
(Original post by Zafda)
you can do crash courses (sorta) into medicine,
Lol this sounds so bad. I can imagine saying to a patient:

"Don't worry, I'm a doctor! I did a crash course...

sorta."
0
reply
Zafda
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#38
Report 7 years ago
#38
(Original post by Bslforever)
Lol this sounds so bad. I can imagine saying to a patient:

"Don't worry, I'm a doctor! I did a crash course...

sorta."
NOO i meant crash course at college of basic sciences etc, then do your normal training years... ma baad!

though if my doctor told me he did a crash course in medicine AND he was amazing, i'd think he was a genius... not such a bad interpretation after all
0
reply
Bslforever
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#39
Report 7 years ago
#39
(Original post by Zafda)
NOO i meant crash course at college of basic sciences etc, then do your normal training years... ma baad!

though if my doctor told me he did a crash course in medicine AND he was amazing, i'd think he was a genius... not such a bad interpretation after all
Lol, nice save
0
reply
OrmondDrone
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#40
Report 7 years ago
#40
(Original post by Wangers)
And pray tell, what happens when she has to do nursing placements? Isn't it the same arguments why she shouldn't do nursing either? If every possible problem has to first be overcome, nobody would ever get round to doing anything.
I wasn't suggesting that she shouldn't do medicine - just that she needs to go in with her eyes open and be aware that she would need to be flexible to at least some degree about location as its not something medical students or junior doctors get a lot of control over. It's obviously up to her whether she thinks that is manageable.

I've no idea whether nursing is of any interest to her or what the placement structure is like.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cranfield University
    Cranfield Forensic MSc Programme Open Day Postgraduate
    Thu, 25 Apr '19
  • University of the Arts London
    Open day: MA Footwear and MA Fashion Artefact Postgraduate
    Thu, 25 Apr '19
  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (264)
39.11%
No - but I will (46)
6.81%
No - I don't want to (50)
7.41%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (315)
46.67%

Watched Threads

View All