How would you split your time in SE Asia? Watch

Ewan
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#21
Report 7 years ago
#21
(Original post by johno090)
I'm planning on something similar but I've heard that the temperature is around 38 degrees in July which is surely too hot to do anything but stay inside next to an air conditioning unit? Is this true?
Temperatures are hotter than the UK, but as with everywhere you get used to it after a while. When I went to SEA I found the temperatures unbearable for the first few weeks (low 30s), but after a month or so it was fine. When I went to the middle east temperatures were reaching almost 50C & I didn't feel any worse than SEA despite the temperatures being far higher. Again I got used to it after about a month. When I got back to the UK I felt cold for a while as well because of the differential.

So yea, we adapt pretty fast
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kirstied
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#22
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#22
Also, I've been looking into doing some trekking when I'm out there. Not sure quite what yet, but say for now, maybe some short jungle ones and up volcanoes on Indonesia. I have my trusty old walking boots but I assume that I'm going to be way too hot in them!? I've never had trekking sandals before but am I much better off with them? It will be rainy season as well. I don't really want to buy them if I could have just made do with my boots or with decent trainers.
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Olibert
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#23
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#23
(Original post by kirstied)
Also, I've been looking into doing some trekking when I'm out there. Not sure quite what yet, but say for now, maybe some short jungle ones and up volcanoes on Indonesia. I have my trusty old walking boots but I assume that I'm going to be way too hot in them!? I've never had trekking sandals before but am I much better off with them? It will be rainy season as well. I don't really want to buy them if I could have just made do with my boots or with decent trainers.
I did trekking around Chiang Mai in trainers.
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Ewan
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#24
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#24
(Original post by kirstied)
Also, I've been looking into doing some trekking when I'm out there. Not sure quite what yet, but say for now, maybe some short jungle ones and up volcanoes on Indonesia. I have my trusty old walking boots but I assume that I'm going to be way too hot in them!? I've never had trekking sandals before but am I much better off with them? It will be rainy season as well. I don't really want to buy them if I could have just made do with my boots or with decent trainers.
I always take with me a good solid pair of sandals, with good soles. They don't cost that much and are good support for your feet. Generally I walk a lot though, perhaps like 10 miles a day is not uncommon. These kinds of shoes will be waay better than trainers for hiking. Don't underestimate how much walking you will do on a normal day sightseeing.

Personally though, in hot climates at least, I wear sandals at least 90% of the time.
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Olibert
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#25
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#25
If you wear sandals for most of your time you have to get used to putting your feet in some very questionable substances
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Ewan
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#26
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#26
(Original post by Olibert)
If you wear sandals for most of your time you have to get used to putting your feet in some very questionable substances
There's still a barrier between my feet and the floor, which is the most important thing to prevent parasites. That being said my feet do get dirty because of all the dust, but it doesn't really bother me.
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