Does getting AAA in A-level require, proportionally, intelligence or hard work? Watch

Phantom Lord
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#21
Report 7 years ago
#21
(Original post by Hannahismee)
I got AAB and dossed around quite a lot throughout the year, I just revised super hard when it got to exam time, apart from the B, I did absolutely nothing for the B. Bad timing on my part.
How did you get the B then? That's still about 70-80%.
0
reply
Last Chance
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#22
Report 7 years ago
#22
What would your perception of intelligent be? GCSE grade wise. :3
0
reply
Hannahismee
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#23
Report 7 years ago
#23
(Original post by AkaJetson)
How did you get the B then? That's still about 70-80%.
A lot of time for A level subjects, it's either remembering stuff or common sense. You'll be fine, your success will equal the effort.
0
reply
...mo...
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#24
Report 7 years ago
#24
(Original post by Alison1992)
i would say it's 50/50 on work/intelligence
i got A*A*A in my A levels this year and whilst i've always been quite bright i'm by no means exceptionally clever
i just put in about 250 hours of revision for my exams, started early and practiced exam technique so i could answer the questions in the way the examiner is looking for
managed to get 100% ums in 4 modules
Can i ask how?
0
reply
!-Twisty-!
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#25
Report 7 years ago
#25
70% exam technique 20% hard work 10% remembering things.
0
reply
SophiaKeuning
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#26
Report 7 years ago
#26
(Original post by Osman1993)
My teacher told us that "you can't get an A at A-levels by just working hard, especially in the sciences. You need to be 70% intelligent and 30% hard working to achieve an A" - Tutor, Bio teacher.

How true is this?
Don't lose heart by anything a teacher says. People sometimes need to remember that a teacher is a person, they are not omniscient and one has every right to challenge them. My friend was told by her science teachers, form tutor and head of year that she will categorically not get into veterinary school. They told her many times and even had the audacity to phone her parents and tell them that she should give up. Safe to say, she's proved them wrong.
0
reply
nickbob00
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#27
Report 7 years ago
#27
To get an A in science subjects, you need to know both be good at the subject, and then also revise the facts you will need to regurgitate. For example, in chemistry you will need to both memorise piles of reaction conditions and recite definitions, but also be able to visualise molecules and imagine what happens to them. If you only could do one or the other, you would stick on a C. With Physics, it is more important to have the natural aptitude, as there are far fewer facts you need to know (a whole lesson of notes can fit on one side of A4 usually, and 95% of them are on handouts for us). For Biology, you need to memorise loads, but you get a little more flexibility, for example there might be 10 possible ways to gain a mark on a 5 mark question.
0
reply
Alison1992
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#28
Report 7 years ago
#28
(Original post by ...mo...)
Can i ask how?
like i said
"i just put in about 250 hours of revision for my exams, started early and practiced exam technique so i could answer the questions in the way the examiner is looking for"
0
reply
Aivicore
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#29
Report 7 years ago
#29
Not necessarily "intelligence" so much as "aptitude for that particular subject".

Personally I think it's swaying more towards effort, and a little bit of luck on exam day.

I got A*AD, not because I am super-intelligent or stupid, but because I put a reasonable amount of effort into two of them and slacked off on the other, which is why I think it's more effort than brains.

Oh, and also intelligence =/= exam technique, although a-levels would have you believe otherwise...
0
reply
eggnchips
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#30
Report 7 years ago
#30
You can probably do it on hard work alone, a girl I know is a dumb as they come got AAB at a-level a first at uni walked right into a 30k a year job and yet only a week ago asked when did unicorns go extinct...

Achieved so much on just hard work and aggressive parents!
0
reply
House Dagoth
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#31
Report 7 years ago
#31
a combination of both.

I have a friend who worked everyday at college until about 6 in his AS year, but his AS grades weren't too great.

So no, hard work cannot suffice without some intellect.
0
reply
d_aan
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#32
Report 7 years ago
#32
I think it's a combination of both, I've learnt after the first year of AS levels that hard work doesn't necessarily mean you will get A's in everything, as I did so much revision for history and came out with a B, whilst in Literature, I did the least and came out with an A. I think the moral of the story for me, was that it's about working hard but also working smart.
0
reply
affleming
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#33
Report 7 years ago
#33
(Original post by eLECTROLOSIS)
Exams are a test of knowledge not intelligence... And in my own experience as someone who is intelligent but didn't work hard enough to achieve my potential, I know that hard work plays a larger part than people think.
maybe you are not as intelligent as you think?
0
reply
JayReg
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#34
Report 7 years ago
#34
Totally depends on the A levels your doing, some subjects like maths, further maths and physics (to some extent) do not necessarily require hard work assuming your academic enough (though that doesn't mean hard work wont get you to the same level). On the other hand there are definitely A levels which require substantial effort to remember vast amounts of info such as biology and psychology etc.

However there's also a huge element on luck and exam technique which is not to be over looked.
0
reply
Is it a bird!?
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#35
Report 7 years ago
#35
Obviously, the teacher plays a BIG part in whether you understand it, and therefore, your grades. But it's hard work as well. I don't believe people are naturally smart (unless they're geniuses), they're just used to that subject more from a young age and so understands it more. It's luck as well! I had a nose bleed in my biology exam, and that unit didn't go so well.. still an A though no complaints
0
reply
785695
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#36
Report 7 years ago
#36
basically, you need to be clever to get good grades, but to be clever, you need to work hard, and to work hard, you need to be determined, so all in all, be determined to do well and success will follow.
reply
eLECTROLOSIS
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#37
Report 7 years ago
#37
(Original post by affleming)
maybe you are not as intelligent as you think?
To go from being an 'A' student throughout my academic life up until to getting BBCC in the second year of A-levels.

There is an element of being able to 'wing it' which I did at AS and got AABB but I definitly neglected A2 and frequently missed some classed for various reasons...
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Solent University
    Careers in maritime Undergraduate
    Sat, 2 Feb '19
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    City and Collegiate Campus Undergraduate
    Sun, 3 Feb '19

Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?

Remain (520)
80.62%
Leave (125)
19.38%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed