MadCatChiken
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#21
Report 7 years ago
#21
Do a placement year between your 2nd/3rd years of uni, there are game studios that take on internships for people currently studying at uni. I know EA, Crytek, Lionhead offer internships this will get you the experience needed.
0
reply
Psyk
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#22
Report 7 years ago
#22
(Original post by miser)
Whilst you're doing university, volunteer making games. Join groups looking for programmers, or start your own project. Game programming is a very competitive industry; you must both be a strong programmer and have experience of game programming in order to get looked at for interviews. Get yourself a portfolio of projects you've been involved with - set up a website where they can see your work, or give them your games on CD. Impress them and make them want you, because it is unfortunate that in the games industry, if you don't, someone else will.
Or no one will. It's actually very hard for game developers to recruit because it's hard to find people that are good enough. They won't hire someone who doesn't meet their standards just because they were the best of a bad bunch.
0
reply
vox
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#23
Report 7 years ago
#23
(Original post by Psyk)
Well my job title when I first started was just 'Programmer', but I don't know how the job was advertised (I got it through an agency, so I never saw an ad for the job, if it even was advertised).
Agencies do like to tweak adverts for whatever reason...

OP: Do a search here with 'graduate vacancies' ticked to find out what is generally expected of a graduate programmer.
0
reply
vox
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#24
Report 7 years ago
#24
(Original post by Psyk)
Or no one will. It's actually very hard for game developers to recruit because it's hard to find people that are good enough. They won't hire someone who doesn't meet their standards just because they were the best of a bad bunch.
Certainly there's a skills gap with computer science courses not offering enough relevant content and many games technology courses not being up to scratch. My impression is that the problem can also lie with interviewers; most of them graduated a long time ago (if indeed they went to university), and expectations can become unrealistic.
0
reply
Psyk
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#25
Report 7 years ago
#25
(Original post by vox)
Agencies do like to tweak adverts for whatever reason...

OP: Do a search here with 'graduate vacancies' ticked to find out what is generally expected of a graduate programmer.
That's the company I used. I highly recommend them.
0
reply
vox
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#26
Report 7 years ago
#26
(Original post by Psyk)
That's the company I used. I highly recommend them.
They seem to be the largest graduate recruiter in the UK. Personally, they didn't help me to get a job (or even an interview), so it's a mixed bag with the vast number of students they work with. I got a job from a lone recruiter, but arranged most of my interviews myself.
0
reply
Outlaw1198
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#27
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#27
Thank you, guys for all the help you have given me.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you made up your mind on your five uni choices?

Yes I know where I'm applying (56)
66.67%
No I haven't decided yet (18)
21.43%
Yes but I might change my mind (10)
11.9%

Watched Threads

View All