I'm a nervous driver and **** at clutch control/traffic lights :( Watch

lubus
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Advisor)
Your instructor is a very bad one. I hope you didn't recommend him to others.
i passed first time. so did everyone else i know who went there. To be honest with you, i dont know anyone who uses the handbrake in regular traffic. I've never been in a car with someone who did this. Beginners shouldn't do it either, its like you're avoiding learning how to control the clutch on steep hills.
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ROG.
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#22
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#22
Roll back more than an inch and look out for the fail !!

To the OP -
Your first problem is in your thinking that you MUST get away quickly at lights with others behind you

If you start thinking - I will go when I am good any ready - then it will all fall into place

Your own thinking process in this situation is making you nervous

No other road user EXPECTS a learner to get away quickly - they might LIKE them to but they KNOW it is not likely to happen - why do you think most like to use the other lane if there is one ......
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HappyBappy
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#23
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#23
(Original post by ROG.)
To the OP -
Your first problem is in your thinking that you MUST get away quickly at lights with others behind you

If you start thinking - I will go when I am good any ready - then it will all fall into place

Your own thinking process in this situation is making you nervous

No other road user EXPECTS a learner to get away quickly - they might LIKE them to but they KNOW it is not likely to happen - why do you think most like to use the other lane if there is one ......
Thanks!

You're right, it's all just a mindset issue that's making me nervous- before I began learning I never appreciated how many potential problems there were at a traffic light so I should make allowances for myself- even if the drivers around me don't.

From now on, I'm just going to take my time, so that I avoid nerve induced mistakes!

I'm actually not that bad a driver, or so I'd like to think.
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Lumos
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#24
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#24
(Original post by HappyBappy)
Just had a lesson and let's just say it could've been better...

I'm fine with open/give way junctions in both directions, hill starts, controlled rolls, basic maneuvers- provided they aren't on a main road.

I just turn into a nervous wreck when there are other road users around me, cyclists that sneak up behind me and pedestrians to smoosh...

Also, how the **** am I supposed to move off at traffic lights. I have the car in first gear, with my hand on the hand break but when the amber appears, I panic lift my foot off the clutch too quickly and stall while my instructor stares at me and says "what the hell are you doing!?" The queue of frustrated drivers behind me just makes me panic more.

Sorry for the novel but how do I deal with road nerves? Also, how you supposed to move off in traffic?
your driving instructor doesn't sound too great... putting you down like that? it probably affects your confidence. I would advise trying with someone else.

Other than that, just try to forget about everyone around you and go at your own pace. It's not an offense to move off in less than 3 seconds, although a lot of people seem to think so! remember everyone was a learner once, and you'll improve soon. try putting the clutch down a little lower than usual, and adding just a few more revs when you take off the handbrake before you move the clutch up. do it very slowly, adding more revs as you loosen the clutch.

try practicing with your parents in a quiet road or estate, it will be less stressful. good luck!
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timothytom
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#25
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id change instructors.

We all have times when we stall even us more experienced drivers.

Practice makes perfect. don't panic yourself.
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Annie72
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#26
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#26
That driving instructor sounds awful, not what you need if you are a nervous driver.Bin him off and find another, more empathetic instructor.
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ColourDog
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#27
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#27
(Original post by HappyBappy)
Just had a lesson and let's just say it could've been better...

I'm fine with open/give way junctions in both directions, hill starts, controlled rolls, basic maneuvers- provided they aren't on a main road.

I just turn into a nervous wreck when there are other road users around me, cyclists that sneak up behind me and pedestrians to smoosh...

Also, how the **** am I supposed to move off at traffic lights. I have the car in first gear, with my hand on the hand break but when the amber appears, I panic lift my foot off the clutch too quickly and stall while my instructor stares at me and says "what the hell are you doing!?" The queue of frustrated drivers behind me just makes me panic more.

Sorry for the novel but how do I deal with road nerves? Also, how you supposed to move off in traffic?
It's frustrating, but I have a similar problem :/ I can drive... Just not when there is anyone behind me LOL!
However, I'm quite good at moving off (I've never stalled?! ).
When i see the light turn to amber, I find the bite, release the hand break, have a quick look and blend it up smoothly Just relax!
I had an *** behind me the other day- I hadn't had a lesson in 3 months (so was v nervous!) and we were stopped at a traffic light and my driving instructor was talking about some driving crap I had no interest in (No offense to him, but it's so dull? :confused: :rolleyes:) and I didn't see light turn to green and the car behind got so angry I then quickly tried to start up, rolled backwards and seriously panicked! Hate, hate, hated it- completely ruined the whole lesson for me. Had to wait for the next green light, so had to listen to the guy shouting out his window at me... WAA I'm just a learner!
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inksplodge
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#28
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The only thing you can do is take your time - within reason of course! Better to take a second extra and do it properly than to stall and get into a panic cos you're holding everyone up :tongue: I was awful at clutch control but you do get better with practice.
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aspirinpharmacist
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#29
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#29
I'm the same! I feel like I have to shoot off because I'm holding up the people behind, but of course, I never put my foot on the accelerator fast enough when I shoot my foot off the clutch. Then of course I'm holding people up because I've stalled. Also, when there's a really small gap on a roundabout and I'm like "I need to get in that gap!!!" *stalls* "S***". I am not a natural driver :rolleyes: I'm so much worse when there are people behind me though. Also, country roads. No matter how many times my instructor tells me I don't need to nudge over to the left a bit when a whopping great big tractor comes along, my instincts are telling me "Huge tractor. Huge wheels. Going to get flattened. Shift to the left a bit and crawl past..."
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HappyBappy
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#30
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#30
A few people are telling me to change instructors. I'm moving in three weeks for uni so I'll have to anyway I'm surprised to see that this happens to other drivers, but it makes me feel better at the same time! I was expecting loads of pleas for me to stay off the road- I am not a confident driver!
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101101
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#31
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#31
(Original post by lubus)
i passed first time. so did everyone else i know who went there. To be honest with you, i dont know anyone who uses the handbrake in regular traffic. I've never been in a car with someone who did this. Beginners shouldn't do it either, its like you're avoiding learning how to control the clutch on steep hills.
You've never been in a car with somebody who uses the handbrake? :confused::eek:
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lubus
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#32
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(Original post by 101101)
You've never been in a car with somebody who uses the handbrake? :confused::eek:
read my previous posts. i mean using handbrake on lights
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DeeWave
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#33
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#33
(Original post by Jason2)
That wears the clutch out fast. Always a sign of a bad driver.
It's not going to cause much wear to hold it there for a second or two at low revs when moving away. Anyway the OP is a beginner and is looking to improve a basic skill - refinement can come later on.
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DeeWave
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#34
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#34
To those who feel rushed in traffic: I assure you it feels much longer to you when you feel under pressure than to those sitting behind. Most drivers really won't be paying that much attention as they stumble through traffic and probably won't even notice if you take a second or two longer than a more experienced driver. And even if they do notice, for the sake of a second or two it doesn't make any difference at all. Anyway they were learners once, and it's unreasonable to expect you to be lightning fast.

So basically, TAKE YOUR TIME. Don't worry about what other people think and just keep calm and concentrate on getting it right, in just the same way as when you're moving off alone on a quiet residential street. Once you're happy doing that, in no time at all your skills will improve and you'll be able to start doing it a little bit faster until you're just like everyone else.
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SpicyStrawberry
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#35
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#35
(Original post by HappyBappy)
Just had a lesson and let's just say it could've been better...

I'm fine with open/give way junctions in both directions, hill starts, controlled rolls, basic maneuvers- provided they aren't on a main road.

I just turn into a nervous wreck when there are other road users around me, cyclists that sneak up behind me and pedestrians to smoosh...

Also, how the **** am I supposed to move off at traffic lights. I have the car in first gear, with my hand on the hand break but when the amber appears, I panic lift my foot off the clutch too quickly and stall while my instructor stares at me and says "what the hell are you doing!?" The queue of frustrated drivers behind me just makes me panic more.

Sorry for the novel but how do I deal with road nerves? Also, how you supposed to move off in traffic?
First off, sod everyone waiting for you they aren't important, don't let yourself get nervous because it'll just make matters more complicated and more likely for accidents to happen!

People should know from your L plates that you are a learner driver so should be more patient when waiting for you to move off, complete manoeuvres etc. If they don't wait, they are the bad drivers not you.

When waiting at traffic lights with your handbrake on, keep your foot at the biting point (or slightly lower) and when the lights go on amber release the handbrake and gently lift your foot off the clutch and you're ready to go.

Technically speaking you're supposed to put it in neutral and handbrake on when at traffic lights with your feet on the floor, but if you aren't waiting long there might not be enough time to do this.
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heathroww
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#36
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my instructor always used to tell me to come off the clutch slowly, by degrees, the width of a pound coin each time (does that make sense?) either way, you NEED to come off your clutch nice and gently because as you know lifting up too quick causes a stall. You can apply more gas, sure, but you shouldnt lift the clutch quicker if you dont know the bite and the car well enough yet, because you could still stall and miss it anyway. Its just going to take practice. The car I learnt to drive in had a large engine, so I had to make sure the amount of clutch lifting and accelerator (sp?) pressing was balanced, yet my own car has a tiny engine, so only wants me to come off the clutch and apply a tiny amount of gas, so you just need to learn the car and work out what is most effective. The point is, make sure you have enough gas for the engine to be purring, but still come off your clutch gently.

Why doesnt your instructor let you hold it below the bite ? and do you get on well with your instructor ? Obviously I dont know and dont want to judge, but from what you've said, he/she seems a bit harsh? they should be constructive in their guidance towards you.

I would always suggest using the handbrake, as in the test it is expected of you, and the examiner wont think you've stopped properly unless its on. If you roll back in your test, you will get some minors for that, if not a fail.
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HappyBappy
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#37
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#37
(Original post by heathroww)
my instructor always used to tell me to come off the clutch slowly, by degrees, the width of a pound coin each time (does that make sense?) either way, you NEED to come off your clutch nice and gently because as you know lifting up too quick causes a stall. You can apply more gas, sure, but you shouldnt lift the clutch quicker if you dont know the bite and the car well enough yet, because you could still stall and miss it anyway. Its just going to take practice. The car I learnt to drive in had a large engine, so I had to make sure the amount of clutch lifting and accelerator (sp?) pressing was balanced, yet my own car has a tiny engine, so only wants me to come off the clutch and apply a tiny amount of gas, so you just need to learn the car and work out what is most effective. The point is, make sure you have enough gas for the engine to be purring, but still come off your clutch gently.

Why doesnt your instructor let you hold it below the bite ? and do you get on well with your instructor ? Obviously I dont know and dont want to judge, but from what you've said, he/she seems a bit harsh? they should be constructive in their guidance towards you.

I would always suggest using the handbrake, as in the test it is expected of you, and the examiner wont think you've stopped properly unless its on. If you roll back in your test, you will get some minors for that, if not a fail.
My friends have told me to do that, but the instructor says there's a risk the car would start moving, which I don't quite understand as the hand break is on... I'm told to "half-prepare" by having it in first, with my hand on the break to take off when the amber comes on.

I get on well with the instructor, but he is one of the most negative people I've ever met. It's always criticism which isn't, in itself, bad but there's never anything constructive about it. I wouldn't mind as much if he said "in future you should..." As I've said, I've got to change instructors in 3 weeks since I'm moving for uni, so at least I don't have to worry about offending him- he takes it really personally when people leave him, or so he says...
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455409
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#38
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#38
(Original post by lubus)
Dont use the handbreak to start!

When you stop at a traffic light, put into neutral, foot on the brake if road isnt flat, look at traffic light. When if becomes amber/ pedestrian light turns red, put it into first, release break, and start moving forward. When it becomes green, apply power and release clutch. simples

dont be worried about rolling back a couple of cm

Edit: a good exercise to do is to find a nice steep hill, and practice holding the car in one place with no break, or practicing starts, rolling back, again. However, you should use your own car as this will slightly wear your clutch
Really the worst advice i've ever heard.
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HappyBappy
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#39
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#39
Update! Had another lesson today and it seemed to go better

I'm still lifting the clutch up a bit too quickly and, when I put gas on, I unwittingly ease off it and the car vibrates as the clutch comes up...

My instructor thinks I could do with getting shoes with thinner soles so I can get a better sense of where the clutch is. Does anyone have any opinions on this, I don't want to waste money!

I didn't stall once though, and I've learned to not get freaked out by drivers behind me :P
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catoswyn
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#40
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(Original post by HappyBappy)
"What the hell are you doing!?"
"What did you do that for!?"
"Do what I tell you to do, and that won't happen again!"

The least paraphrased it could be while being understandable to those unfamiliar with Shettleston English...

I've done it without finding bite point but then the clutch comes up too quickly and, when it doesn't stall, it vibrates disturbingly because there isn't enough gas!
Have you thought about changing driving instructor? This person seems a bit short tempered to me and its not helpful for nervous drivers.

You don't say what stage you are at with driving lessons. If you are not long into them then things may well improve as you get more experienced. If this has been going on for a long time and is not getting better and you are coming up to a test anytime soon then a re-think is necessary.

You could think about learning to drive and taking your test in an automatic car if you are a person who just never gets to grip with the clutch. The only problem with this is that you are then only qualified to drive an automatic car which are a bit more expensive to buy in the first place. Still if you really get stuck this is certainly an option.

Good luck.

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