Turn on thread page Beta

can i have the honest truth watch

Announcements
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I doubt it makes a difference OP, but from my many visits to the dentists I would say that if you want to do whatever it is dental assistants do you have to be at least an 8/10. I don't know why this is, but I am yet to encounter a 7 or below and this is across numerous dental surgeries, even in different countries. :dontknow:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lazershus)
    :eek: well i'm not that big so if she can get in then i guess i could too with a lot of effort!
    There you go then and she is not the biggest med student I've seen either. Didn't you watch Junior Doctors? That guy was huge! He struggled to make it to crash calls!!

    To be totally honest, I would be more concerned about the actual application rather than your weight. Seriously. Don't put too much pressure on yourself.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Bit irrelevant, but if potentially medical schools did dislike overweight candidates, do you think they'd discriminate against people who look very underweight? I can't really imagine it, even though some of the points mentioned would apply too (unhealthy person trying to tell people to be more healthy...). Hmm
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    A good friend of mine managed to lose weight by having an exercise bike in front of the tv. You might as well sit on a bike and pedal, he reasoned, than sit on the sofa. Maybe worth a try?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Some medical schools don't even interview, so they probably wouldn't know if you were overweight. I'm not saying that you should restrict yourself to these medical schools by the way, I really doubt that they'd discriminate on the basis of your weight. I know someone fairly overweight who starts in September and she had 3 offers, if that helps.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BethaneyJ)
    There you go then and she is not the biggest med student I've seen either. Didn't you watch Junior Doctors? That guy was huge! He struggled to make it to crash calls!!

    To be totally honest, I would be more concerned about the actual application rather than your weight. Seriously. Don't put too much pressure on yourself.
    ahh thanks, i'm worried about everything, it's kind of what i do, i try to be as thorough as i can when researching things without going into it blindly with no information. you've been really helpful though, much appreciated!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    As others have said, although universities aren't allowed to discriminate candidates based on things like this, that doesn't mean it can't happen. As a med student they'd expect you to be health conscious - it'd be pretty hard for you to convince a patient to lose weight if you are obese yourself. Imagine being nagged to quit smoking by a chain smoker. It's like if you wanted to be a beauty therapist, the people interviewing you are more likely to lean towards the better-presented, immaculate-looking candidate as opposed to the slightly scruffy looking one, regardless of if they of the same ability. It's unfair, but it's life.

    I don't think you should give up on medicine because of this. If anything, the situation you're in provides you with a massive incentive to lose weight and help you achieve your goal! You can use it to your advantage, too, as you can say you have had personal experience with weight loss which could be helpful when advising patients to lose weight. It won't be easy, but just think how good you'll feel - not only physically but also emotionally / mentally as you'll have (in my opinion, and I think others agree with me) a better chance of getting onto your course.

    I don't think you have to lose a massive amount of weight, just enough so that you aren't classed as "obese". Many nurses / doctors are slightly tubby which is absolutely fine, I don't think they get judged on that, it's obviously when their size goes beyond big that there's an issue I think. Bare in mind the average size nowadays is a 16, no-one would expect nurses to be below the average size and be like an 8 or whatever. As long as you are healthy I think that's the main priority (not only for your career, but for your overall happiness!)

    I hope this helps, and good luck whatever you decide to do.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lazershus)
    ahh thanks, i'm worried about everything, it's kind of what i do, i try to be as thorough as i can when researching things without going into it blindly with no information. you've been really helpful though, much appreciated!
    We all have to start somewhere, don't worry Good luck applying
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    A good friend of mine managed to lose weight by having an exercise bike in front of the tv. You might as well sit on a bike and pedal, he reasoned, than sit on the sofa. Maybe worth a try?
    that's an interesting idea but that would cost money and i'm as broke as anything plus i'm not a tv person, it's mostly crap that's on :P


    (Original post by ayseta)
    Some medical schools don't even interview, so they probably wouldn't know if you were overweight. I'm not saying that you should restrict yourself to these medical schools by the way, I really doubt that they'd discriminate on the basis of your weight. I know someone fairly overweight who starts in September and she had 3 offers, if that helps.
    yep, that's helpful, i think i'll stop worrying about it now and just keep trying to lose weight instead while bumping up the other parts of my application
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Well, Jon Barclay got in.



    Also if I were obese I think I'd kind of rather talk to an obese doctor about it than a thin one (assuming, of course, that they were equally qualified etc)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by emilie18)
    As others have said, although universities aren't allowed to discriminate candidates based on things like this, that doesn't mean it can't happen. As a med student they'd expect you to be health conscious - it'd be pretty hard for you to convince a patient to lose weight if you are obese yourself. Imagine being nagged to quit smoking by a chain smoker. It's like if you wanted to be a beauty therapist, the people interviewing you are more likely to lean towards the better-presented, immaculate-looking candidate as opposed to the slightly scruffy looking one, regardless of if they of the same ability. It's unfair, but it's life.

    I don't think you should give up on medicine because of this. If anything, the situation you're in provides you with a massive incentive to lose weight and help you achieve your goal! You can use it to your advantage, too, as you can say you have had personal experience with weight loss which could be helpful when advising patients to lose weight. It won't be easy, but just think how good you'll feel - not only physically but also emotionally / mentally as you'll have (in my opinion, and I think others agree with me) a better chance of getting onto your course.


    I hope this helps, and good luck whatever you decide to do.
    thankyou, that's really helpful, i think that's what i've basically gathered from everyone's answers, would rep you but apparently reached my limit :'( thanks for sparing time for the advice though, i'll keep at it and hope for the best! *fingers crossed*
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Your avatar lied to me.

    Come to think of it I've never seen a fat doctor. I guess it doesn't set a good example. I mean imagine a 300lb fatass trying to convince a patient to lose weight. It would be like a doctor telling someone to stop smoking while hes puffing on a cigarette. Also you can't do anything financial if you have bad credit because if you cant look after your own finances how are you going to look after someone elses? Same goes for health. Plus you have to be medically fit to be a doctor for some reason. probably to do with being physically able to cope with the demands. I don't think it would be discrimination because you could argue that obesity is not a natural look but a medical condition and you can ban people from certain jobs based on their medical condition.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nonswimmer)
    Well, Jon Barclay got in.



    Also if I were obese I think I'd kind of rather talk to an obese doctor about it than a thin one (assuming, of course, that they were equally qualified etc)
    well this is sad, i can't watch the video have a curfew on social networking sites on my internet, i guess i'll watch it tomorrow.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Podcaster)
    Your avatar lied to me.

    Come to think of it I've never seen a fat doctor. I guess it doesn't set a good example. I mean imagine a 300lb fatass trying to convince a patient to lose weight. It would be like a doctor telling someone to stop smoking while hes puffing on a cigarette. Also you can't do anything financial if you have bad credit because if you cant look after your own finances how are you going to look after someone elses? Same goes for health. Plus you have to be medically fit to be a doctor for some reason. probably to do with being physically able to cope with the demands. I don't think it would be discrimination because you could argue that obesity is not a natural look but a medical condition and you can ban people from certain jobs based on their medical condition.
    yeah, i've basically gathered this now, it would be nice if medical schools made it more blatant on their requirements on something like that, although some people might find it offensive it would definitely help.
    and i actually need to change my avatar, seems to be misleading a lot of people -.- i just thought people would know who it is :'(
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    In my class at medical school there are quite a few people who are overweight and also a few who are clearly underweight. As long as you are medically fit then they will pick the best candidates. The only stumbling block I can imagine is that medical schools often like candidates who are involved in sporting activities (not that I'm saying that overweight people can't play sport :P).
    In any case you do have time to lose at least some of the weight and so good luck to you.
    Slightly off topic but it is surprising how little medical schools seems to care about medical conditions. We all had HIV tests at the start and they said that it was likely that at least one of us would test positive (not me luckily :P), and that this would not stop them continuing. They are also happy to take candidates who have mental health issues or psychiatric disorder as long as they are not a danger to colleagues and patients.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lazershus)
    thankyou, that's really helpful, i think that's what i've basically gathered from everyone's answers, would rep you but apparently reached my limit :'( thanks for sparing time for the advice though, i'll keep at it and hope for the best! *fingers crossed*
    Not a problem, glad I could help! I honestly think you shouldn't let this hold you back, just let it spur you on and I'm sure you will achieve what you want to with a little hard work.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by calm_storms)
    In my class at medical school there are quite a few people who are overweight and also a few who are clearly underweight. As long as you are medically fit then they will pick the best candidates. The only stumbling block I can imagine is that medical schools often like candidates who are involved in sporting activities (not that I'm saying that overweight people can't play sport :P).
    In any case you do have time to lose at least some of the weight and so good luck to you.
    Slightly off topic but it is surprising how little medical schools seems to care about medical conditions. We all had HIV tests at the start and they said that it was likely that at least one of us would test positive (not me luckily :P), and that this would not stop them continuing. They are also happy to take candidates who have mental health issues or psychiatric disorder as long as they are not a danger to colleagues and patients.
    ahh thanks, well that sucks cos i actually don't do any real sport, now and then i do badminton but that doesn't even count!
    that's interesting, maybe they're trying to not be prejudiced or discriminate against those with a few health issues, i would imagine that if someone had a psychiatric disorder and they were allowed to continue then it won't be very severe and will be under control by some drugs or other treatments.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lazershus)
    ahh thanks, well that sucks cos i actually don't do any real sport, now and then i do badminton but that doesn't even count!
    that's interesting, maybe they're trying to not be prejudiced or discriminate against those with a few health issues, i would imagine that if someone had a psychiatric disorder and they were allowed to continue then it won't be very severe and will be under control by some drugs or other treatments.
    To be honest playing badminton occasionally is enough to put on your personal statement if you claim that it helps you relax and taught you to keep trying and you will improve at things (or some other rubbish that turns up on PS :P).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by calm_storms)
    To be honest playing badminton occasionally is enough to put on your personal statement if you claim that it helps you relax and taught you to keep trying and you will improve at things (or some other rubbish that turns up on PS :P).
    ahahaa, i'll definitely just add it to give me some range in hobbies and interests :P thanks for the tips btw, everyone is so helpful on here! or at least most people
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lazershus)
    i've actually googled this for hints and searched uni websites thoroughly but none seem to mention it. if you're overweight and potentially obese, do you have a really low chance of getting into medical school?
    i want the honest answer because i'm pretty sure i'll be disadvantaged with this, i am currently trying to work on my weight and i would like to know if this will or will not be an important factor in my application so i don't end up wasting my time applying. i would be so grateful if anyone replies
    If I interviewed you I would give you an offer. Because plump girls are hawwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwt :sexface:
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: August 19, 2012

University open days

  • University of Lincoln
    Brayford Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 12 Dec '18
  • Bournemouth University
    Midwifery Open Day at Portsmouth Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 12 Dec '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All undergraduate Undergraduate
    Wed, 12 Dec '18
Poll
Do you like exams?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.