Goldsmith's Vs. Birkbeck Vs. UCL Watch

pharmakos
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#21
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#21
I study at UCL but I have to say that Birkbeck is indeed a great uni, even though you won't find it in different league tables. I guess that's because Birkbeck is essentially an evening college in terms of teaching.

But that won't tarnish the fact that Birkbeck's research quality is world-class. This is evident in the fact that Slavoj Zizek serves as the international director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities (He's coming to Birkbeck this may to host a one-month workshop). Also, the research output (per person) of its Econ dept is only second to LSE and UCL in the UK. Last but not least, Birkbeck tops all other unis in the UK in a league table of research funding success: "Birkbeck was successful in 48% of its grant applications – well above the national average of 25% for universities. Next in line was the University of St Andrews and Goldsmith’s College, both with 44%, with Oxford coming in at 35% and UCL at 30%." http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/20060406
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pharmakos
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#22
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I also got rejected from Oxford and I stalled my app to Cambridge because I wanted to more research on my Mphil topic
I don't know if you know about this: the "MPhil" at Ox and Cam is equivalent of the "MA" at, say, UCL, Birkbeck, Leeds, etc. Both are the so-called taught degrees. But the "MPhil" at the latter is a research degree which requires 2 years of research and a 60,000-word thesis (in the case of UCL).
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ArtHistorian
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#23
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#23
Actually..
A MPHIL in the History of Art (at Cam) is not a taught degree. It is a year long research program that requires you to have a specific topic before you start the school. Super specific like "Roses in 1851 Britsh paintings by Rossetti."
The Mres at Oxford (that I applied for) was a taught degree.
The MA at UCL and Birkbeck are both taugh degrees with a 1 year duration.
Advisors told me to opt for the MA because it give a broader education, but obviously more specific than a BA. If you want to go to a mphil it should be after a specific topic is chosen, and it is usually another 2 years for a phd from there
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pharmakos
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#24
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It's more proper to say that Cam's MPhil runs as somewhere between a taught and a research degree; its requirements (taking courses, seminars, papers, a thesis) are not quite different from the MA at UCL or Courtauld.

UCL's MPhil requires an MA degree, much more work, and longer length of study, in contrast to Cam's MPhil.
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passthesaltplease
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#25
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(Original post by pharmakos)
I don't know if you know about this: the "MPhil" at Ox and Cam is equivalent of the "MA" at, say, UCL, Birkbeck, Leeds, etc. Both are the so-called taught degrees. But the "MPhil" at the latter is a research degree which requires 2 years of research and a 60,000-word thesis (in the case of UCL).
Actually, the Oxford MPhil is also a 2 year degree. First year is taught second year is a 45 000 word thesis (I think, but I am trying not to think to hard about it...shudder). You can get a 1 year MSt that is equivilent to an MA.
That said, you don't actually need to have done a Master's to get in (although Oxford being Oxford, I think it helps)
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ArtHistorian
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#26
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Totally agree... for Art History anyway
a MA helps when applying for a MPHil and Ox and Cam, because the admissions office feels like you have a better sense of exactly what you want to study. Both departments are tiny and they want to make sure that they can provide...
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Jazzza
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#27
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Yeh sure maybe the area round Goldsmiths is okay or whatever - but for someone from the US, Goldsmiths is not where they would expect it to be considering the address is London. You'd like expect it to be central, like UCL. Goldsmiths is quite south of London really and not on the underground map. Has to be UCL.
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kalen
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#28
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(Original post by passthesaltplease)
Actually, the Oxford MPhil is also a 2 year degree. First year is taught second year is a 45 000 word thesis (I think, but I am trying not to think to hard about it...shudder). You can get a 1 year MSt that is equivilent to an MA.
That said, you don't actually need to have done a Master's to get in (although Oxford being Oxford, I think it helps)

I think it gets a bit confusing in Arts and Humanities subjects. An MSt is not equivalent to a MA, as it's a 9-month taught course. I think the equivalent to a MA is either an MLitt or an MPhil, not all MPhil's are 2 year programs. I have a friend who's studying for an MPhil in Social Anthropology or something like that and she's doing a 12 months program, same as my MSc for Science. Other MPhil's are 2 years long though, I guess it depends on the topic/subject. But an MSt is worth less than an MA (no research involved I believe).
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passthesaltplease
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#29
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(Original post by kalen)
I think it gets a bit confusing in Arts and Humanities subjects. An MSt is not equivalent to a MA, as it's a 9-month taught course. I think the equivalent to a MA is either an MLitt or an MPhil, not all MPhil's are 2 year programs. I have a friend who's studying for an MPhil in Social Anthropology or something like that and she's doing a 12 months program, same as my MSc for Science. Other MPhil's are 2 years long though, I guess it depends on the topic/subject. But an MSt is worth less than an MA (no research involved I believe).
Basically, I think there's no proper equivilency. Whatever post-grad you do you'll work really hard and get whatever the University and department decides to give you when you've finished.
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kalen
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#30
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(Original post by passthesaltplease)
Basically, I think there's no proper equivilency. Whatever post-grad you do you'll work really hard and get whatever the University and department decides to give you when you've finished.
True! I was referring more to degree 'names', as Oxford doesn't offer MA's.
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passthesaltplease
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#31
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(Original post by kalen)
True! I was referring more to degree 'names', as Oxford doesn't offer MA's.
When I was at school a few of my teachers had MA (Oxon) and there I thought they were really brainy....

Its actually a really interesting history why the MA is honorary. Life expectancy in the Middle Ages and all that.

(Random post for today)
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alconway
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#32
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Hi fellow art historians! I'm glad I finally found some of you!!

I am also an American student, applying to Masters programs in the UK for art history. Congrats on the acceptances to UCL!! I'm still waiting to hear from mine and hoping that the news won't be disappointing ....

Anyway, I wanted to ask your opinions on a couple other Universities for the History of Art program and perhaps get a few opinions.

I've been accepted in the MA History of Art at the University of York and the MA Curating Contemporary Art at the University of Essex.

My focus is modern/contemporary art... does anyone have an opinion about which offer I should accept if I do not get into UCL???

Thanks!!!
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