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    (Original post by Agent Smith)
    Same way some gay people get upset when someone unthinkingly says, "I missed the bus. That's really gay". However, this is not always the case. Some gays don't care.
    My gran still uses gay on a daily basis (with it's old meaning) and anyone she finds a bit strange, or nervous around is a bit "queer".
    She talks of "******* in the woodpile", people being "niggardly" and talked about how when the cat come down the chimney it was "as black as a ******".
    She's no intention of being racist or offensive, it's just the language of her time.
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    (Original post by SolInvincitus)
    I didn't know ******* was a bad word. Be nice. I have never heard it before, that is all.
    Sorry, I was saying that the TSR censoring is pathetic, not you.
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    (Original post by spacedonkey)
    My best friend has a son with cerebral palsy, and has made it something of a personal crusade to stop the casual use of the word "spaz". She finds it extremely upsetting that the word is seen as acceptable - tantamount to saying it's okay to taunt her son about his disability really. Colin Firth uses the word in Love, Actually, and after complaining she got a hand-written, sincere and grovelling apology from Richard Curtis. The same goes for "mong" and "flid" - my feeling is that if using these words (even with absolutely no intent to hurt people with CP, or Downs or those with birth defects whose mothers took thalidomide during pregnancy) causes hurt and upset and perpetuates discriminatory attitudes, then it is wrong to use them in the public domain anyway.
    No offense but wouldn't her time be better spent as a personal crusade to educate people of the effects of cerebal palsy than telling people off for casual use of a certain slang term?
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    What about "Yiddish"? The term refers to a kind of European Jewish slang. One would think that Yiddish is spoken by Yids, just as Polish is spoken by Poles and Turkish by Turks. But, when you look up Yid in the dictionary, you find it's a derogatory term for a Jew. Where's the sense in that? The words share a root, namely the German Jude, so why is one considered deeply offensive and the other perfectly legitimate?

    The whole world of insults is in my opinion too confusing for definite lines to be drawn between what is offensive and what is not.
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    (Original post by cheesecakebobby)
    No offense but wouldn't her time be better spent as a personal crusade to educate people of the effects of cerebal palsy than telling people off for casual use of a certain slang term?
    I think she sees that as the very point - the term is used unthinkingly, often by people who don't realise that it derives from citsaps (backwards! bloody filter!)
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    (Original post by EastMidlander)
    My gran still uses gay on a daily basis (with it's old meaning) and anyone she finds a bit strange, or nervous around is a bit "queer".
    She talks of "******* in the woodpile", people being "niggardly" and talked about how when the cat come down the chimney it was "as black as a ******".
    She's no intention of being racist or offensive, it's just the language of her time.
    Rudyard Kipling's story of How The Leopard Got His Spots has an Ethiopan man saying "oh, plain black's best for a ******" - but does that make the story somehow racist? No. Kipling is using, just like your grandmother, the language of his time.

    EDIT: And what about Shakespeare's Juliet? "It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night/As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear".
    Sound familiar? That's right, she's shining like a sixpence in a chimney-sweep/******'s ear. Or like a banana in a coal-scuttle.

    Would anyone dare call the author of Othello a racist?
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    (Original post by Agent Smith)
    What about "Yiddish"? The term refers to a kind of European Jewish slang. One would think that Yiddish is spoken by Yids, just as Polish is spoken by Poles and Turkish by Turks. But, when you look up Yid in the dictionary, you find it's a derogatory term for a Jew.
    You score a double there, in some dictionaries the word jew is classed as potentially offensive now.
    "Jewish person", is the prefered norm these days, if you are of the politically correct persuassion.
    These terms get chased round and around, as it's not really the words that are offensive, it's the people using them, there intent, and how they are percieved.
    Technically any name or label is offensive, and by the same token none are.
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    Except he was using it in his time. I doubt aforementioned grandmother could get away with such language in the company of blacks nowadays. But would Tiger have made his comments to a disabled journalist?
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    (Original post by EastMidlander)
    You score a double there, in some dictionaries the word jew is classed as potentially offensive now.
    "Jewish person", is the prefered norm these days, if you are of the politically correct persuassion.
    :toofunny:

    seriously?
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    (Original post by Agent Smith)
    So roll on insulting behaviour! Bring it on, I say.
    I have a newfound respect for you.
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    (Original post by Amon.)
    :toofunny:

    seriously?
    Seriously
    http://www.answers.com/Jew
    USAGE NOTE It is widely recognized that the attributive use of the noun Jew, in phrases such as Jew lawyer or Jew ethics, is both vulgar and highly offensive. In such contexts Jewish is the only acceptable possibility. Some people, however, have become so wary of this construction that they have extended the stigma to any use of Jew as a noun
    Someone moaned about it to me the other day.
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    Yes, J*w is deeply offensive. It carries the implication that all Chr*stians, M*slims, Ath*ists and Agn*stics are going straight to H*ll like the g*dless ***** ****** ******* ********** ***** ******* *** ******* *** ******* ***** ********* ************** **** *** ******* **** *** ***** they are.


    o tempora, o mores.
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    (Original post by cheesecakebobby)
    Except he was using it in his time. I doubt aforementioned grandmother could get away with such language in the company of blacks nowadays. But would Tiger have made his comments to a disabled journalist?
    Ah, that's the flip side of emancipating the insult. Tact. Tiger wouldn't have; Ken Livingstone would, because he wouldn't know what "tact" meant if you wrote it on a wet fish and slapped him with it.
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    Heh. Well that article made one suggestion that in America 'spaz' does not carry the same connotations and simply means 'idiot'. So should someone have to apologise for offending when they did not intend to offend or was not aware that it could be taken offensively?
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    Insults are in the intention, not the word.
    I wouldn't consider 'Jew' offensive. I call myself a 'Jew', not a 'Jewish person'. But I know that it can be used as an insult, but then again, so can Jewish (i.e. telling a stingy person to 'stop being so Jewish') so what the hell is the point of changing what you say?
    I do remember reading an article about the use of the word 'Jew' which I think was inspired because it was noticed at the time that if you typed 'Jew' in to Google then the top result was jewwatch.com (an anti-semitic site), but I don't think that a word can become an insult simply because some people choose to use it that way.
    I never cease to be amazed at what this forum filter blocks... I mean ****** (drater backwards)? What about if we're having a discussion about handicapped people, it is a legitimate medical term (as is the extended form of spaz).
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    (Original post by cheesecakebobby)
    Heh. Well that article made one suggestion that in America 'spaz' does not carry the same connotations and simply means 'idiot'. So should someone have to apologise for offending when they did not intend to offend or was not aware that it could be taken offensively?
    Are you saying that ignorance is an acceptable excuse for being offensive? "Spaz" is used here to mean "stupid" too, and many people are unaware of the origin of the word - I'm not sure that that makes it ok though!
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    You're all *******s.
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    (Original post by cheesecakebobby)
    Heh. Well that article made one suggestion that in America 'spaz' does not carry the same connotations and simply means 'idiot'. So should someone have to apologise for offending when they did not intend to offend or was not aware that it could be taken offensively?
    Again - tact is the key. If you offend someone by accident, it shouldn't be a case of "have to". Common decency should dictate your response.
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    People should only take offence if it is said in an offensive way. Otherwise you're too sensitive and as I was told while I was being bullied at school by the teachers, 'Sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt me'. So if you're offended grow some balls. Life stinks. Oh sorry, have I now offended smelly people? Am I a mong or what?
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    (Original post by JonathanH)
    Insults are in the intention, not the word.
    I wouldn't consider 'Jew' offensive. I call myself a 'Jew', not a 'Jewish person'. But I know that it can be used as an insult, but then again, so can Jewish (i.e. telling a stingy person to 'stop being so Jewish') so what the hell is the point of changing what you say?
    I do remember reading an article about the use of the word 'Jew' which I think was inspired because it was noticed at the time that if you typed 'Jew' in to Google then the top result was jewwatch.com (an anti-semitic site), but I don't think that a word can become an insult simply because some people choose to use it that way.
    I never cease to be amazed at what this forum filter blocks... I mean ****** (drater backwards)? What about if we're having a discussion about handicapped people, it is a legitimate medical term (as is the extended form of spaz).
    Well, there's been no response yet to my question as to whether the filter can be turned off for discussion purposes. I don't know what the response would be if you posted a serious thread using "drater" or "citsaps" in H&R. Anyway, be thankful TSR doesn't autofilter "Nazi", otherwise D&D would be in real trouble!

    It's alarming that Google search for "Jew" brings up anti-Semitism straight away. That's the sort of skew I'd expect of Google.cn. And of course there are the Jew-money jokes - Cartman's demand for Kyle's bag of Jew-gold, the strange illusion that all Jews wear big flat hats, have big noses, and never, ever shave - and so on. Scots are on the receiving end of the "tight-fisted" stereotype, too. The term "that's a bit Irish" has never fazed me, even though I have significant Irish connections. Many of the "Jewish persons" on TSR seem to take the conspiracy theories and Jew-gold nonsense as a great joke. I suspect most Scots, Irishmen, Muslims or any other stereotyped group revel in their perceived identity to a similar degree. The only people who take it seriously are those too poisoned by hatred to think straight. Oh, and the Welsh. :p:

    These insults prove the point quite nicely - and I hope I can explain it without coming across as anti-Semitic myself. If you shelter people from insults all their lives, they become sensitive - excessively so. I believe the reverse - Jews laughing along with the Jew-gold joke, for example - is a much healthier state of affairs. Example: If I was to call you, Jon, a whole string of anti-Semitic insults, I reckon you'd be not so much offended as angry. Chances are you'd insult me back, or at least put me down in no uncertain terms. Isn't that much, much more satisfying and effective (and quicker and cheaper) than running away crying to the cops? You'd confront the problem immediately and head on, rather than running away into the arms of the law, which will probably find it much harder to deal with the issue.

    This backwards-typing lark is giving my brain a nice workout. I can almost feel it pulsating.
 
 
 
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