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    (Original post by diamondgeezer)
    Kind of you, so even though I want to go down translating and interpreting route
    "you must have a thorough knowledge of the institutions, culture, attitudes and practices" - Getting into interpreting?, Institute of Translating and Interpreting, www.iti.org.

    How about ESPS then?
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    I have quite a lot of the leaflets in front of me from the Insitute of Translation and Interpreting.

    'A high standard of education, a degree in interpreting or in languages with a postgraduate training in interpreting are the norm among today's interpreters'.

    All the things you mention I'm interested in, for example current French economy and current French poltics. I don't want a degree reflecting in medieval history, I want a degree where I can embrace in modern day French culture.
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    To clarify one point it is just historical literature I don't want to do.
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    i think the conclusion is there are plenty of choices out there, you just have to make sure you apply to the right uni and choose the right course. maybe not economy (im not sure, maybe youd have to be doing a course in international business or management with french), but certainly things like politics are offered at many decent universities. and if you have a great dislike of "historical literature" no one will force you to do it. your a levels show you have an interest for languages, and your other two show you have a broader approach to your studies, so basically the world is your oyster, you just have to go fishing and find what will suit you. it will take a while cause there are so many different names and combinations for language degrees, but you have to take a few hours to sift through ucas, the websites and the prospectuses to see if anything is tailored to what you want to do. there are many tips and ideas for course combinations and locations in these replies, so i would suggest you use them as a starting point.
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    (Original post by diamondgeezer)
    Kind of you, so even though I want to go down translating and interpreting route , you wouldn't recommend going to university???

    So because I don't want to study medieval literature, I shouldn't study languages at uni, what a load of tosh!!!!
    When did I say that? I don't know where you're getting this medieval stuff from - just because I said I have got into medieval German literature? I was not saying at any point that you have to do it! I wrote about the courses I'm doing - only one of them is medieval (and that was completely my choice - I could have done politics, history, or any number of things); indeed, only two of them are strictly literature. You can do whatever you like, as long as it's something!

    All I'm saying - in a general kind of way - is, if you really are not interested in studying the culture of the places in which your languages are spoken in any way, then do an evening class. I'm planning on doing that with French next year (although I would say I'm interested in the literature in a general kind of way, it wasn't enough for me to want to study it at uni).

    As princessa says, have a really good look around. Stay away from the more traditional courses, as they are likely to have a higher literary content.

    So, yeah, I've repeated myself three times now. Is it going to be read properly now?
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    Are you not reading what I'm saying though? Sorry if I'm sounding rude I probably just misunderstood your post.

    Thanks for the advice anyway- it is appreciated. Just I'm interested in the culture, the politics and the economy- I was asking whether I could stay away from medieval literature (Yes, I know this wasn't clear from my original post).

    Sorry I wasn't trying to sound arsey, to be honest, I'll just lump the literature if it is absolutely necessary, but will opt out where possible.

    Thanks everyone once again for the advice!
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    I'm certain that you will be able to avoid medieval literature, and possibly even literature altogether, especially since you'll be Joint Honours. Just really, really research your potential courses - you don't want to turn up there in the September and find out you have to study nothing but medievalness . Good luck!
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    Just seen this as I've been at Enforex in Granada doing a Spanish course
    Anyway, I guess I don't have much different to add but just wanted to say something as I was in the same situation. I wanted to study French and Spanish but not literature as I love reading it but not analysing it and writing essays on it. However I love linguistics so I looked for courses including this. There aren't many for 2 languages + linguistics (Cambridge, St Andrews, Southampton and Newcastle I found)
    So I would work out what sort of "content" you want to do ie linguistics, film, other aspects of culture and find places with modules that will let you do this. This isn't always easy as uni websites aren't always that great and sometimes don't publish their modules.
    So as has already been said I think, you can get round literature at Cambridge, Durham if you do 3 languages in the first year, Southampton and Newcastle if you do linguistics. I think many unis will make you do a bit of literature in the first year but you'll then be more free to choose what you want to focus on.
    Well I hope I've been of some use. Post what you decide on when you decide!
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    hey, at bangor it's 100% language but i'm not sure you'd like that because that implies very little/no culture...
    ps i'm in the same boat, i'd like to study some literature but not as heavily as most courses seem to be.
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    (Original post by ange de la nuit)
    hey, at bangor it's 100% language but i'm not sure you'd like that because that implies very little/no culture...
    ps i'm in the same boat, i'd like to study some literature but not as heavily as most courses seem to be.
    Why do you say that bangor is 100% language its not!

    In the first year theres 2 literature modules, a module on paris, the renaissance and cinema.

    In your second and fourth year you can be more choosy, but its definitely not just language based!
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    Wow, complete opposite to me. I decline my offer from Bristol purely because it didn't have enough literature
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    (Original post by Che!)
    Wow, complete opposite to me. I decline my offer from Bristol purely because it didn't have enough literature
    Your crazy !
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    (Original post by Che!)
    Wow, complete opposite to me. I decline my offer from Bristol purely because it didn't have enough literature
    That's what I like about Bristol
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    (Original post by Nel48)
    Your crazy !
    No, I insist, you have it.
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    I think if you do a "neutral" degree and do 30 credits each year in the language you get around the literature bit!
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    (Original post by diamondgeezer)
    I have quite a lot of the leaflets in front of me from the Insitute of Translation and Interpreting.

    'A high standard of education, a degree in interpreting or in languages with a postgraduate training in interpreting are the norm among today's interpreters'.

    All the things you mention I'm interested in, for example current French economy and current French poltics. I don't want a degree reflecting in medieval history, I want a degree where I can embrace in modern day French culture.
    Why don't you go for a degree with Translation Studies then? I'm doing it with German at Aston
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    (Original post by PrinceOfCats)
    "you must have a thorough knowledge of the institutions, culture, attitudes and practices" - Getting into interpreting?, Institute of Translating and Interpreting, www.iti.org.

    How about ESPS then?
    Erm according to your link ITI is "a unique network of clinicians and researchers in implant dentistry and related tissue regeneration"
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    (Original post by jellybones)
    Erm according to your link ITI is "a unique network of clinicians and researchers in implant dentistry and related tissue regeneration"
    Yeah, well, you've learnt something new about implant dentistry I'll bet.

    .uk may help.
 
 
 
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