dsch
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#21
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#21
(Original post by slick_rick)
But have we not assumed that we can put 99 balls in one jar? Why not 50 then?

Im just trying to get my head round this.
No restrictions are made on the capacity of the jars. In such a situation it is not reasonable to assume a finite limit which would alter the solution of the problem, rather to assume that this variable is immaterial to the solution; that it would have been given if it were important. Here, that would mean jars with capacities of at least 100 balls for each jar.
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dsch
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#22
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#22
(Original post by slick_rick)
Bruv, thats what i thought. Great minds think alike!
...Fools seldom differ. lol

(Don't take that the wrong way, it's an old saying...)
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President_Ben
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#23
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#23
(Original post by coughsyrup)
Perhaps a list could be set up here.
Almost all of the problems are straight forward unless you're 1) not really good enough to do them or 2) the question has been asked because it is specific to your degree. I don't think huge amounts of weight is put on them either. I think answering them tends to show you've done your research rather than have the mind for it. Hence the popularity of ones you can't prepare for

(eg. how many hamburger are eaten in the UK per day, how many places in the UK sell hamburgers, how many pints are drunk in Cambridge on an average Friday night, how many train carriages are there on the circle line at any point in time etc)

You get standard brainteasers and questions directed more towards your degree. If you do something where you might meet some non-euclidean geometry, you might get the one Olek posed.

There are plenty of Physics/mechanics ones involving boats, water, ice cubes, lifts and ping pong balls. If you do Economics, know your basic models and stay more up-to-date with current affairs than the rest of them in that you should be able to come up with a decent economic opinion of something real or hypothetical (and if the later, feel free to slip in some facts about the real world or use another event as a template).


Olek - The running track is one mile in length. You do a lap at 30 mph. How fast do you need to do the next lap, in order for your average speed over two laps to be 60 mph. Answer already given above. Sure you know it or seen it.


And the jars really is very very easy...
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dsch
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#24
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#24
I'm not really sure that non-Euclidean geometry was required for the spheres, it's just a reasoning problem requiring you to think how walking in one direction can bring you to the same place on a sphere (only a circle) and that doing it again doesn't effect where you finish up. I reckon the only thing higher mathematical knowledge brings to this problem is the certainty that no others solutions than these loci exist. Actually, President Ben, I was interested in a few questions, not to read up (I mean, I start uni in October...) but to have a little think, like I did about the sphere question. I guess I should stop trying to get cheap fun and read a book.
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Johan C
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#25
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#25
(Original post by President_Ben)
Almost all of the problems are straight forward unless you're 1) not really good enough to do them or 2) the question has been asked because it is specific to your degree. I don't think huge amounts of weight is put on them either. I think answering them tends to show you've done your research rather than have the mind for it. Hence the popularity of ones you can't prepare for

(eg. how many hamburger are eaten in the UK per day, how many places in the UK sell hamburgers, how many pints are drunk in Cambridge on an average Friday night, how many train carriages are there on the circle line at any point in time etc)

You get standard brainteasers and questions directed more towards your degree. If you do something where you might meet some non-euclidean geometry, you might get the one Olek posed.

There are plenty of Physics/mechanics ones involving boats, water, ice cubes, lifts and ping pong balls. If you do Economics, know your basic models and stay more up-to-date with current affairs than the rest of them in that you should be able to come up with a decent economic opinion of something real or hypothetical (and if the later, feel free to slip in some facts about the real world or use another event as a template).


Olek - The running track is one mile in length. You do a lap at 30 mph. How fast do you need to do the next lap, in order for your average speed over two laps to be 60 mph. Answer already given above. Sure you know it or seen it.


And the jars really is very very easy...
How long do they leave you to think about those questions ? Do you have to answer immediately ? Can you think for a couple of mins ?
Also I gotta be stupid, because while the running track one was fairly straightforward I didn't find the answer to the jars... Never been good at this stuff anyway, + I believe that maths and training do help - eg. in the case of the jars.
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President_Ben
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#26
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#26
(Original post by coughsyrup)
non-Euclidean geometry
Is as soon as you stop being 'on a plane'. A sphere is a nice and easy starting point and the question asked is pretty straight-forward if you ever encounter the stuff.

The question is more typically posed in an alternative way (and more geometric) involving triangles on a spherical surface that have internal angles that sum to 270 degrees (or something similar).
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President_Ben
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Johan C)
How long do they leave you to think about those questions ? Do you have to answer immediately ? Can you think for a couple of mins ?
Also I gotta be stupid, because while the running track one was fairly straightforward I didn't find the answer to the jars... Never been good at this stuff anyway, + I believe that maths and training do help - eg. in the case of the jars.
The thing about the jars is that the moment you start moving beads, whatever the colour, it should be pretty obvious that the probability is changing, so you should start taking extreme cases (and this a case of something that is an asymptote, albeit, discretely).

I don't think there's a set time limit, but you should go be going through your thoughts (out loud). There's little interest in the answer (supposedly, though the right one helps) and plenty in the way of thinking through a problem being logical and communicated clearly.
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dsch
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#28
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#28
(Original post by President_Ben)
Is as soon as you stop being 'on a plane'. A sphere is a nice and easy starting point and the question asked is pretty straight-forward if you ever encounter the stuff.

The question is more typically posed in an alternative way (and more geometric) involving triangles on a spherical surface that have internal angles that sum to 360 degrees (or something similar).
oh for ****'s sake... I really think you should listen to yourself and stop being quite so patronising. Of course I know what frigging non-Euclidean geometry is, mathematics being a hobby of mine for a long time and my knowledge of it might even challenge yours (shock horror).

My point was that you don't actually have to know anything academic to solve it.
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President_Ben
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#29
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#29
Shock horror, you're not the only person on this forum and not everything said to you is just for you, otherwise it'd come in a PM - shock horror :eek: Horror. Shock.

You don't need anything academic to know that if, say, interest rates rise (shock), there will probably be an increase in unemployment (horror). But a really good explanation that is sound may well require a bit of economics.

:eek:

The female of the species is more deadly than the male
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dsch
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#30
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#30
that was excellent *****iness. Are you sure you have a Y chromosone? You might be a natural...

Nobody asked what Euclidean geometry was.
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President_Ben
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#31
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#31
A sense of humour will take you a long way. Shock.

:eek:

The question can very easily get expanded on to cover a lot more non-euclidean geometry. Just to see how far you can be pushed and how you deal with the pressure.
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dsch
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#32
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#32
Agreed, I certainly hope I can have a sense of humour like yours one day. Whatever, just get off the pedestal and realise just quite how over-bearing you can be. I doubt it's the first time somebody might have suggested just what a know-it-all you are. A little humility will get you a long way too.
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President_Ben
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#33
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#33
(Original post by coughsyrup)
Agreed, I certainly hope I can have a sense of humour like yours one day. Whatever, just get off the pedestal and realise just quite how over-bearing you can be. I doubt it's the first time somebody might have suggested just what a know-it-all you are. A little humility will get you a long way too.
:eek:

This is an internet forum. If you don't like what I write, don't read it! I quite frankly, don't care (Shock! :eek: ) But I suppose you must think what you write and your opinion to try and make other people do what you want is far from over-bearing... right? The horror! :eek:

I've pointed out how the question comes across and for the many who aren't familiar with non-euclidean geometry, given a quick bit of info on what it is. How shocking and horrifying!!!
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dsch
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#34
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#34
(Original post by President_Ben)
:eek:

This is an internet forum. If you don't like what I write, don't read it! I quite frankly, don't care (Shock! :eek: ) But I suppose you must think what you write and your opinion to try and make other people do what you want is far from over-bearing... right? The horror! :eek:

I've pointed out how the question comes across and for the many who aren't familiar with non-euclidean geometry, given a quick bit of info on what it is. How shocking and horrifying!!!
I'm not sure how you'd get that idea. I'm writing to you. People shouldn't be made to do anything and are free to think what they want of my posts. You're right that this is a forum but it is also apparently a community and not a place for certain individuals to disseminate information in a most patronising manner. I'm sure if anyone gave a flying **** they'd have asked what NEG was or consulted a suitable information source (you do seem to advocate this) and found a definition for themselves.
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Klinsmannic
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#35
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#35
(Original post by President_Ben)

The running track is one mile in length. You do a lap at 30 mph. How fast do you need to do the next lap, in order for your average speed over two laps to be 60 mph. Answer already given above.
lol This is a great teaser
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President_Ben
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#36
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#36
Do you feel more :cool: because you get to insert **** into a message when it is totally unnecessary? :confused:

I wrote

Is as soon as you stop being 'on a plane'. A sphere is a nice and easy starting point and the question asked is pretty straight-forward if you ever encounter the stuff.

The question is more typically posed in an alternative way (and more geometric) involving triangles on a spherical surface that have internal angles that sum to 360 degrees (or something similar).
Is that horr-or-ibly over-bearing or patronising? I tried to very quickly express what is going in the question and pointed out the name of the field and given a brief description of what it is and how the sphere is a simple case? Should I have gone into great length about saddle points or multi-dimensional versions? That would have been patronising. Shock.

:eek:

If you're going to pull someone up on something, make it something good or I'll start going for the banter.


Of course I know what frigging non-Euclidean geometry is, mathematics being a hobby of mine for a long time and my knowledge of it might even challenge yours
Sounds a lot more know-it-all and over-bearing than anything I've seen in this thread :eek: Horror!
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President_Ben
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#37
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#37
(Original post by Klinsmannic)
lol This is a great teaser
In order to run two laps at an average speed of 60 mph, you need to do each lap in a minute.

If you do the first lap at 30 mph, that takes 2 minutes, meaning you have to the second lap in zero time. And bob ton oncle (said the bloke from the Orange advert), it is therefore, impossible (given sensible constraints that don't allow time-travel or travelling at infinite speed or something weird like that...)
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dhokes
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#38
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#38
With "Female of the Species" blasting in the background, thanks President Ben for the extra info!
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Klinsmannic
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#39
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#39
(Original post by President_Ben)
In order to run two laps at an average speed of 60 mph, you need to do each lap in a minute.

If you do the first lap at 30 mph, that takes 2 minutes, meaning you have to the second lap in zero time. And bob ton oncle (said the bloke from the Orange advert), it is therefore, impossible (given sensible constraints that don't allow time-travel or travelling at infinite speed or something weird like that...)
I admit i had to google it. My immediate thought was the answer is 90, then i realised there must be an element of skullduggery involved.
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Ibrahim
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#40
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#40
(Original post by coughsyrup)
I'm not sure how you'd get that idea. I'm writing to you. People shouldn't be made to do anything and are free to think what they want of my posts. You're right that this is a forum but it is also apparently a community and not a place for certain individuals to disseminate information in a most patronising manner. I'm sure if anyone gave a flying **** they'd have asked what NEG was or consulted a suitable information source (you do seem to advocate this) and found a definition for themselves.
Without getting involved or taking sides in your heated discussion, I *don’t* think President Ben’s posting was patronising in any shape or form. In the past, I’ve found President Ben to be very knowledgeable and incredibly friendly. It’s obvious both of you guys are very talented and knowledgeable in your own right, but let’s try to keep this forum *civil* as much as we can so that we all benefit from each other’s knowledge and experience. I hope I didnt offend anyone. Thanks
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