Not going to Uni, where can I find a decent job??!! Watch

global_warning
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#21
Report 13 years ago
#21
Not so in the USA. Also, if the military really need you, like in Iraq where there aren't enough troops, they can, and have, issue "stop loss" orders delaying your exit from the military- 3 months, 6 months, etc. Also you have an obligation to serve in the IRR or Individual Ready Reserve- this is a period equal to your enlistment time- if you enlisted for 4 years, you are in the IRR for 4 years. You are inactive during this period, but increasingly people have been called back to the military years after they thought they were done.
0
reply
Shéamais
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#22
Report 13 years ago
#22
You join the military for going to places like Iraq. I'm currently training to be a TA officer while at university and hope to get deployed the year after I graduate, and then when I return train to be a regular officer. I also know a 17yr old lad who has just joined the RWR (TA) and hopes to get deployed on Op Telic 10.

It's what you join for, if you join for others reasons not expecting to get deployed you shouldn't have joined.

It's a bloody good job. I'd rather have a little risk in my life than sit at a desk for 40 years of my life.

I did also suggest the RAF, my brother in law has been in the RAF for 25 years, and has never been deployed to a warzone, and he gets paid bloody well.

Further to point mentioned above about resigned because you have been called up, you can't resign if you've had a compulsary mobilisation order. Very bad form anyway to resign because you've been called upto to do the job you've been trained for. Remember we're the British not the Septics, it's not actually as bad as the media make out. I know a Lieutenant who came back from last November and he enjoyed it. He earnt more money than he did in his civilian job.

Any armed forces questions give me a PM.
0
reply
kjc287
Badges: 0
#23
Report Thread starter 13 years ago
#23
Lol thanks for the adivice guy but im not really an 'army' sort of person!!Lol!! i was thinkin more like office work, in London in a compnay or summing!! xxx
0
reply
fubu
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#24
Report 13 years ago
#24
Depending on your A Level results, you could get a job within the Big Four. Dunno if a career in accountancy takes your fancy or not. It isn't all number crunching you know, there's lots of different roles, even a few non-number ones.

check out:

http://www.deloitte.co.uk
http://www.kpmg.co.uk
http://www.pwc.com
http://www.ey.com
0
reply
global_warning
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#25
Report 13 years ago
#25
(Original post by kjc287)
Lol thanks for the adivice guy but im not really an 'army' sort of person!!Lol!! i was thinkin more like office work, in London in a compnay or summing!! xxx
Phew...thank goodness.
0
reply
Purple
Badges: 15
#26
Report 13 years ago
#26
Try banks, they have school leavers programmes, Lloyds TSB has a really good one
0
reply
RangerDave
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#27
Report 13 years ago
#27
(Original post by DPM)
Join the army? Always a good job, good pay and prospects.
Agreed. But during your service you get payed S*** (atleast in Sweden). But after your service and you decide for a career in the military the pay is quite good and there are alot of priviliges compared to the civilian scum.
0
reply
kjc287
Badges: 0
#28
Report Thread starter 13 years ago
#28
cool cool! yeh my friend has got an interview with kpmg but i was too slow so thing aren't looking good for me thankx for al lthe help guys keep adding more companys/businesses if you know any that take A level leavers !!

thank you alllll xxxxxx
0
reply
brabzzz
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#29
Report 13 years ago
#29
Army pays well, especially as you know absolutely ****-all after A-levels. I suppse there's the question of whether to go for regular or officer entry - both have their advantages, but for the right person i imagine they're both a great first step. Would also make for a productive transformation from pimply student to grown up (or soemthing like that).

Office job? You can't really enter any professional firm and not get left for dust by the graduates that join '3' years later. You'll be at a disadvantage in 'their' world. Generic 'offices' that 'run' companies, rather than sell their services to clients, are really dull places to work. Super dull. Imagine doing the same thing, in some guise, for the rest of your life, week in week out. Urghhh. And getting walked over by a grad half your age. Urghhhhh. I'd rather join the army/get a trade (chef, plumber, driver etc) where you won't, from the very outset, be competing with grads.
0
reply
Shéamais
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#30
Report 13 years ago
#30
(Original post by brabzzz)
I suppse there's the question of whether to go for regular or officer entry
What about entry as a regular officer? I think you mean "I suppse there's the question of whether to join the ranks or as an officer".

Sorry to be pedantic.
0
reply
brabzzz
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#31
Report 13 years ago
#31
Yep. that's the one! I had it on the tip of my tongue but couldn't quiet remember the correct terminology.
0
reply
kjc287
Badges: 0
#32
Report Thread starter 13 years ago
#32
lol guys i don't mean into the army!!! i meant working in an office!! like for a company in London or something!coz eventually i wana become a PA!!
0
reply
global_warning
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#33
Report 13 years ago
#33
(Original post by kjc287)
lol guys i don't mean into the army!!! i meant working in an office!! like for a company in London or something!coz eventually i wana become a PA!!
I think it takes them a while...
0
reply
teh_samby
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#34
Report 13 years ago
#34
Couldn't you start sooner than September? I know you have to take your A Levels and will prolly wanna chill out after that because it's a pretty stressful time, but why wait until September? Might give you more optins if you're available sooner.
0
reply
brabzzz
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#35
Report 13 years ago
#35
(Original post by global_warning)
I think it takes them a while...
I heard him the first time.

In a nutshell, my point is that i can't see any point to wanting an 'office job'. It's a 'professional' environment and as therefore one where you're eventually going to hit a wall as a non-grad. There are a million and one careers where this isn't an issue. The office world isn't one of them.
0
reply
kjc287
Badges: 0
#36
Report Thread starter 13 years ago
#36
well could u sugget summin else then??
0
reply
Lofty
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#37
Report 13 years ago
#37
I do find it surprising how many people really believe that because they are getting a degree they can walk in and go above someone who has got 3 years of experience in the job, especially so in an office!

From an employers POV, would you pick the one with 4 years of on the job experience who already has the necessary knowledge, or a grad who is about to get his/her first job, so they might know a few cool facts and equations, but not always things that will be hugely useful.

I am obviously not speaking from experience, but my brother manages a business in london, and he, along with a lot of businesses that he knows and that i have read about really aren't too fussed about degrees. From his point of view he would rather choose someone that has decent grades at school, put them on a probationary period and see what they are like. Essentially, hardly anything that actually regularly gets used in office work gets taught at school, and not always in uni.

I think a lot of grads might be getting a shock when they think they can prance into a company and start as a manager or something, when in the real world they will probably have to start from the bottom and work their way up the ladder, just a few years older and with some letters after their name.


But in essence, contact a few agencies, even if it is only temp work, it is all still experience under your belt which will make companies far more likely to employ you. www.londonjobs.com is good.
0
reply
Aristotle
Badges: 0
#38
Report 13 years ago
#38
(Original post by Lofty)
I do find it surprising how many people really believe that because they are getting a degree they can walk in and go above someone who has got 3 years of experience in the job, especially so in an office!

From an employers POV, would you pick the one with 4 years of on the job experience who already has the necessary knowledge, or a grad who is about to get his/her first job, so they might know a few cool facts and equations, but not always things that will be hugely useful.

I am obviously not speaking from experience, but my brother manages a business in london, and he, along with a lot of businesses that he knows and that i have read about really aren't too fussed about degrees. From his point of view he would rather choose someone that has decent grades at school, put them on a probationary period and see what they are like. Essentially, hardly anything that actually regularly gets used in office work gets taught at school, and not always in uni.

I think a lot of grads might be getting a shock when they think they can prance into a company and start as a manager or something, when in the real world they will probably have to start from the bottom and work their way up the ladder, just a few years older and with some letters after their name.


But in essence, contact a few agencies, even if it is only temp work, it is all still experience under your belt which will make companies far more likely to employ you. www.londonjobs.com is good.
I think people exaggerate both sides of the coin:

Firstly, you have the:

"I have a red brick degree. Therefore, I deserve a £30,000 starting salary and will get promoted to being a manager within 3 years. By the time I'm 30, I'll be a millionaire.

And then you have:

"Oh, degrees are useless! Why get into debt when you can work your way up? Who is honestly going to use titrations while in an office?

Here's a general rule of thumb:

- A good degree will bump up your salary. For a trainee position in an office, for example, you are expected to start of approximately £10-11,000 per year with a small/medium sized firm. A trainee graduate will usually start on £16-17,000 at the very least with a medium/transnational company.

- Being a manager is not as easy as it sounds. Qualifications become more and more irrelevant as experience increases. For managerial positions, you need excellent people skills, confidence, good references and the appropriate qualifications. It doesn't matter how smart you are - if you can't motivate others, be authoritative and stand up to people, management isn't for you.

The advantages of a degree:

- It bumps up your starting salary.

- It opens more doors. There's no reason why you can't study physics and end up doing finance.

- When looking for promotions, a good degree will give you an excellent headstart and first impressions are important.

- You'll learn to manage yourself.

- It's fun!

Disadvantages:

- It's costly.

- Many degrees are worthless (but you have yourself to blame if you end up with one).

- It might not be for you.

- You don't get any work experience, although internships are a great help.

Advantages of working straight away:

- You earn money and have no debt.

- You're learning the working world.

- There are schemes when you can study and work at the same time.

Disadvanatges:

- A lack of a degree tends to isolate you from big multinational companies.

- Promotion tends to be difficult if you are competing with other graduates.

Of course, if you start up your own company, then that's a completely different ball game. Although, the managerial skills I mentioned previously are extremely important when starting up your business.

I hope that has opened your mind.
0
reply
GarageMc
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#39
Report 13 years ago
#39
ICS you can.
0
reply
kjc287
Badges: 0
#40
Report Thread starter 13 years ago
#40
thanks for ya help lofty! its good to see that I can get support from some people, and that not everybody thinks that people who arent going to unviersity are 'wasters'
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What's stopping you doing a masters?

It's too expensive (9)
23.68%
My career doesn't need one (4)
10.53%
I'm sick of studying (9)
23.68%
I can't find a course I want to do (1)
2.63%
I don't know enough about them (3)
7.89%
Nothing, I'm going to do it! (12)
31.58%

Watched Threads

View All