Dmon1Unlimited
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#21
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#21
at A level, i had around 8 people in my physics class
maths was huge, chemistry (i heard) was huge
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cambio wechsel
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#22
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#22
(Original post by scrotgrot)
If you'll forgive me, you're no scientist yet: UK population is 60 million, US population is 300 million, Chinese population is 1.3 billion.

So while it's true we are only half as good as the Americans and Chinese, it's not nearly as bad as you are saying, with statistical analysis like that you could be a journalist or politician!
This rather misses the point, and on two grounds:

1. He wasn't taling about patents in the general but patents related to a discovery made in the UK. It would/should be expected that a land-grab circumstance would lead to the UK's being disproportionately represented here.

2. As you rightly suggest, figures should be adjusted for population, but...

From a population 5 times the size of that in the UK, US researchers have filed for 10 times as many patents.

From a population 22 times that of the UK, Chinese researchers have filed for 40 times as many patents.

In both cases, then, these countries have made population-dispropotionate industrial applications on the back of a UK-based discovery.

Bear in mind as well that talk of 'the Chinese population' is often misleading, and certainly in this context. On sensible estimates, at most a third are presently living in what could sensibly be called developed circumstance (i.e. the kind of circumstance out of which industrial patents might conceivably emerge). There's precisely no sense in factoring in the 500 million Chinese living in absolute poverty when making this kind of comparison.
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SillyEddy
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#23
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#23
My physics class was split into two groups because of the class size. By the end of A2 there were probably 40 people or so in total studying it. Maths is a big one though... A good 30 studying maths with statistics or maths with mechanics (the two optional modules were run on different timetable slots) and then an additional handful for further maths and the such. In total, probably 80 people doing maths. The vast majority of those did another sort of science along side that... I heard chemistry and biology were quite popular.

My college didn't do engineering, but there was a dedicated bunch of around 20 students who did electronics (myself included) and a good 30-40 doing design technology too.


I think funding will cause a decline in the sciences and in the practical subjects like electronics and design tech. Lab space and technicians aren't cheap, so colleges might not be able to run all those classes. It's a shame because they're really vital.
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Dukeofwembley
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#24
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#24
(Original post by stuart_aitken)
Genuinely wondering about this, so I'm wondering if people can tell me of the popularity of these subjects at their own schools and colleges.

I'm an adult, doing A-level Physics as an evening course at a college in Waterloo. The college is very big with lots of science rooms. There are only 5 of us in the class, which is fine because it's an evening class and we had to pay for it, so obviously it's not gonna be super popular.

However, today was exam day. I expected to be sat with a bunch of students who were also studying Physics during the day at this college, but nope. In the end three of us sat the exam. THREE, all adults, there by choice, in a college in the heart of London?! (Southwark College - about 500m from Waterloo station). So yeah, just to confirm, this is a full sized college, but the only candidates for the Physics exams were three adults, in a college that can probably host 50-100 science students at a time.

Also, I'm doing A-level Maths, self-taught at home. I sat my maths exams at a local college and was again surprised by how few there were. There was myself, another adult candidate, and only about 7 school student candidates, and a few of those were just doing re-sits.

I'd love to know how popular these subjects are at other peoples' colleges? Also, of the people who are studying Maths and Physics, who is intending to use it in later life (eg wants to studying Engineering, etc)?

I really am quite shocked at how few people seemed to be doing these subjects. No wonder Britain isn't going anywhere these days! Haha. As an example - Graphene was discovered/created/invented in the UK, yet this country only has 50 graphene-related patents pending. To compare, the US has about 500, Chinas has 2000.

Is the UK scientifically... dying? Or maybe its still popular among high-calibre school students, but after university graduation they go where the money is and work in finance, standard engineering, and other skilled-but-not-special-yet-highly paid jobs, instead of towards innovation?

Thoughts?
you are nothing but a troll

99% of what you said is false
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Jack93o
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#25
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#25
reason for low numbers is because apart from medicine/dentistry, people don't have many ideas about careers in science particular in the field of physics

hence why you have reasonably high numbers of people doing chemistry and biology, but fewer for physics.

on the other hand, maths is very popular, but thats because its pretty much related to everything, you have engineering people doing it, as well as those in the social science
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mike123567
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#26
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#26
The job market is totally distorted in the UK, 1000 people will apply for a finance job, and it will pay 80k, and 10 people will apply for an engineering/science job that pays 25k, are these really market forces?

The reason is that in this country the financial elite actually create money from nothing. Watch "The money masters" on you tube and you will understand why science/engineering will never pay well.

After all steam engineers helped create the modern world, but they are dust whereas the financial guys have been there all along making a packet.
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radiopred
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#27
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#27
(Original post by mike123567)
The job market is totally distorted in the UK, 1000 people will apply for a finance job, and it will pay 80k, and 10 people will apply for an engineering/science job that pays 25k, are these really market forces?

The reason is that in this country the financial elite actually create money from nothing. Watch
Thank god you never did economics
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