Is it OK to do weights two days in a row? Watch

Old School
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Smack)
They also lifted quite a lot less weight than is lifted now. Even in the early 60s they were quite weak by today's standards - I enjoy reading old Starr articles about people maxing out at like sub 300lb deadlifts and the like.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Saxon Because a bent press of 385 is weaksauce.

But the gear enables lifters to train more frequently.
Having the financial support to train properly also helps. More so than gear which these athletes may or may not be on.

Well, a lot of people did try training every day and it did break them. If it was all that then surely it would be a common way of training for people other than top weightlifters.
It really comes down to what you want from training. If you want to get hawt for the girls then sure, train chest and broceps a couple times per week. If you want to be awesome then you've got to put the hours in. If you don't want to put the hours in don't complain about being mediocre.

Seriously though, to be great at anything you have to do it alot. Be it lifting, darts or your profession.

I'm just being a **** now but...

Are top weightlifters as awesome as they are because they train an obscene amount and do 'common' training methodologies produce mediocre results because they require mediocre effort by comparison.

Cheers for your thoughtful replies btw, I'm not arguing to be a knob. I genuinely enjoy having to think about what I type on a message board for once.
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Smack
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(Original post by Old School)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Saxon Because a bent press of 385 is weaksauce.
No-one does the bent press now, probably because it's stupid. But look at the records for everything else, they're much higher now, aren't they?

Having the financial support to train properly also helps. More so than gear which these athletes may or may not be on.
How do you know that it helps more?

It really comes down to what you want from training. If you want to get hawt for the girls then sure, train chest and broceps a couple times per week. If you want to be awesome then you've got to put the hours in. If you don't want to put the hours in don't complain about being mediocre.

Seriously though, to be great at anything you have to do it alot. Be it lifting, darts or your profession.

I'm just being a **** now but...

Are top weightlifters as awesome as they are because they train an obscene amount and do 'common' training methodologies produce mediocre results because they require mediocre effort by comparison.

Cheers for your thoughtful replies btw, I'm not arguing to be a knob. I genuinely enjoy having to think about what I type on a message board for once.
Lifters like Malanichev, Coan and Kirk all trained their lifts using a fairly low frequency. In fact pretty much everyone who isn't a weightlifter uses what is a low frequency relative to the multiple daily sessions of top European and Asian weightlifters.

Also, since when do common training methodologies only produce "mediocre" results? If they did, then why do others repeat them?

Regarding weightlifters, obviously there's the issue that top European and Asian weightlifters have the financial means to do nothing but train. But there's also the fact that they tend to be selected over hundreds of others who didn't make the cut, whose bodies weren't able to keep up with the training. Then there's also the fact that a diet of cleans, snatches and front squats produces a completely different effect than one of benches, deadlifts and rows. The lack of an eccentric component makes a massive difference; what works for one doesn't work for the other, hence why the olympic lifts are trained using different rep ranges and percentages.

I don't think you're being a ****, but it is pretty ignorant to look at the top 1% of weightlifters and then label everything that is different to how they train as "mediocre", especially when these so called "mediocre" training methods have produced pretty much every single record powerifting record and pretty much every single Mr Olympia.
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rafa.bodybuilder
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#23
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weightlifters can usually be able to train the same muscle 2 days in a row because although they train heavy the workout volume is really low so they barelly dont get doms in the day after.
if you train more like a bodybuilder you're supposed to get sore in the day after and let your muscles recover with appropriate dieting and rest. remember, you grow while you rest and not in the gym.

a cool split that i've been following is this :

monday - legs
tuesday - chest
wednesday - off
thrusday - back
friday - shoulders
saturday - arms
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Leicester
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(Original post by rafa.bodybuilder)
weightlifters can usually be able to train the same muscle 2 days in a row because although they train heavy the workout volume is really low so they barelly dont get doms in the day after.
if you train more like a bodybuilder you're supposed to get sore in the day after and let your muscles recover with appropriate dieting and rest. remember, you grow while you rest and not in the gym.

a cool split that i've been following is this :

monday - legs
tuesday - chest
wednesday - off
thrusday - back
friday - shoulders
saturday - arms
I tried one like this but found that I couldn't find any back or leg exercises that felt worthwhile/ not boring!! I do all my working out at home as I can't afford a gym, I have weights, dumbells and a stationary bike. Can you recommend any worthwhile exercises for either back or legs??


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rafa.bodybuilder
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taking into account you are only able to do exercises with dumbbells and barbell the best exercises imo are :

back - deadlift (always include this one in your back workout), bent over row with barbell or dumbbell, if with dumbbell do only one arm rows, pull or chin ups

traps - barbell or dumbbell shrugs

shoulders - db or bb military presses seated or standing, if standing use the barbell, front raises with db or barbell, lateral raises and rear delt raises, arnold press

chest - bench press with bb or db decline, flat or incline, flyes w/ dumbbells incline, decline or flat, pullovers

triceps - dips, close grip bench, skullcrushers, dumbell extensions

legs - squat (always include this in your leg workout), db or bb lunges..
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keepoffthelawn
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Yes it's absolutely fine.. What are your goals? To get big? Then you have to EAT more as well... there's no such thing as over-training, only under-eating..
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RollerBall
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(Original post by keepoffthelawn)
Yes it's absolutely fine.. What are your goals? To get big? Then you have to EAT more as well... there's no such thing as over-training, only under-eating..
Go over 90% your 1RM for a week straight on squats and see if you still think the same.

I've had CNS burnout, this was with 8 hours sleep and a 3k kcal diet. My squats went down, not up.
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alexwilliams1996
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Make sure you're eating enough calories, and take 1 or 2 rest days a week for your muscles to recover
its different for everyone though, so listen to your body!
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keepoffthelawn
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(Original post by RollerBall)
Go over 90% your 1RM for a week straight on squats and see if you still think the same.

I've had CNS burnout, this was with 8 hours sleep and a 3k kcal diet. My squats went down, not up.
Hmm well i guess it depends on how much you sleep and the quality of it and your nutrition as well.. And ok i admit i was a bit extreme in my initial answer, i do believe you can overtrain in the long run, but i think in the case of OP he's just feeling his first ever doms and is now finding it as an excuse not to go to the gym and be lazy instead anyway that's just the impression i got and which was why i wrote that..
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BugleBlower
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#30
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Many factors involved but absolutely no reason why you can't train back to back.
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Old School
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#31
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(Original post by RollerBall)
Go over 90% your 1RM for a week straight on squats and see if you still think the same.

I've had CNS burnout, this was with 8 hours sleep and a 3k kcal diet. My squats went down, not up.
I did it for a month and a half straight and put ~20kg on my 1RM (170-190). I only stopped because I subluxed my hip which was more to do with how I was squatting and not the frequency and intensity.

Ergo: Just because it doesn't work for you doesn't mean it won't work for someone else.
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silent ninja
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(Original post by Old School)
I did it for a month and a half straight and put ~20kg on my 1RM (170-190). I only stopped because I subluxed my hip which was more to do with how I was squatting and not the frequency and intensity.

Ergo: Just because it doesn't work for you doesn't mean it won't work for someone else.
This is why I like this dude (ignore title, watch video):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sLd...e_gdata_player

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RollerBall
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(Original post by Old School)
I did it for a month and a half straight and put ~20kg on my 1RM (170-190). I only stopped because I subluxed my hip which was more to do with how I was squatting and not the frequency and intensity.

Ergo: Just because it doesn't work for you doesn't mean it won't work for someone else.
The majority of trainees on this forum are in no way capable of managing their intensity and autoregulating their lifts enough to prevent burning out. It's just not sensible telling these guys to go out and train like the massive dudes and expect them to manage their own programming, it'll end badly.

Don't get me wrong, when you have the experience to program and design a routine which revolves around autoregulation or perioridisation then fine. It works for newbies when they have very small weights (hell, everything works for newbies) and it works when you have the experience of being an advanced lifter. In the intermediate though you'll just **** it up.
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Old School
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(Original post by RollerBall)
The majority of trainees on this forum are in no way capable of managing their intensity and autoregulating their lifts enough to prevent burning out. It's just not sensible telling these guys to go out and train like the massive dudes and expect them to manage their own programming, it'll end badly.

Don't get me wrong, when you have the experience to program and design a routine which revolves around autoregulation or perioridisation then fine. It works for newbies when they have very small weights (hell, everything works for newbies) and it works when you have the experience of being an advanced lifter. In the intermediate though you'll just **** it up.
Autoregulation isn't exactly hard. 'I feel tired' so don't train as hard/take a day off. To me it just seems like the internet and gyms are full of people who don't really want to try all that hard and hence use the mystical magical phenomenon of 'overtraining' (which they never have nor likely ever will experience) to justify why they don't want to work hard. It's exactly the same as girls saying they don't want to lift 'cos they might get bulky'.
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Jimbo1234
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(Original post by Old School)
Yes.

'Overtraining' is a lie. People should be training more not less.

I've squatted for 2 weeks straight before without issue and have trained overhead basically everyday this last week. Just make sure you're getting enough food and sleep in to support it and you'll be fine.
That is utter crap. Over-training is a waste of time and can lead to injury. Muscles need 48-72 hours to recover. To exercise them during this time will either lead to no gains or actual reduction in performance. And before you reply, this has been known about for decades.
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silent ninja
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(Original post by Jimbo1234)
That is utter crap. Over-training is a waste of time and can lead to injury. Muscles need 48-72 hours to recover. To exercise them during this time will either lead to no gains or actual reduction in performance. And before you reply, this has been known about for decades.
I very much doubt that.
Simple test: Do some pushups or pullups every single day. You'll see a HUGE increase in performance in a matter of weeks compared to resting several days in between. Crude example but just to point out it's not cut and dry like you think. Many routines have you working out every other day too (<48 hours) on your ENTIRE body, so that means the same muscles. People get massive on these routines too.

The body is a lot better at adapting than we think. It's why you don't get aches so often.

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AmoreAmore
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(Original post by silent ninja)
I very much doubt that.
Simple test: Do some pushups or pullups every single day. You'll see a HUGE increase in performance in a matter of weeks compared to resting several days in between. Crude example but just to point out it's not cut and dry like you think. Many routines have you working out every other day too (<48 hours) on your ENTIRE body, so that means the same muscles. People get massive on these routines too.
This tbh.

Muscles lose the growth stimulus after around 36 hours tops, I believe.

Though press ups aren't a good example at all. One type of bodyweight exercise is hardly the same as all over heavy barbell training days in a row.
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Jimbo1234
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(Original post by silent ninja)
I very much doubt that.
Simple test: Do some pushups or pullups every single day. You'll see a HUGE increase in performance in a matter of weeks compared to resting several days in between. Crude example but just to point out it's not cut and dry like you think. Many routines have you working out every other day too (<48 hours) on your ENTIRE body, so that means the same muscles. People get massive on these routines too.

The body is a lot better at adapting than we think. It's why you don't get aches so often.
No it will. This is fact - just google "recovery process exercise". The only known way to reduce this is to hit the roids.

Those gains will be for someone relatively unfit. If you push yourself to the limit during one day, your performance for the next few days will be dire due to muscle exhaustion.
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silent ninja
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(Original post by Jimbo1234)
No it will. This is fact - just google "recovery process exercise". The only known way to reduce this is to hit the roids.

Those gains will be for someone relatively unfit. If you push yourself to the limit during one day, your performance for the next few days will be dire due to muscle exhaustion.
On the other end of the spectrum, professional (natural) lifters train every day. I don't buy it. The body adapts. Even a sprinter will train every day and their performance improves. Adaption and conditioning surely matter.
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Jimbo1234
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(Original post by silent ninja)
On the other end of the spectrum, professional (natural) lifters train every day. I don't buy it. The body adapts. Even a sprinter will train every day and their performance improves. Adaption and conditioning surely matter.
They train different muscle sets, and runners will be training different muscle tissue as they don't want mass, but reflex time.
Just find me any evidence that recovery time doesn't exist and I'll take you seriously.
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