what languages formed the English language we have today? Watch

Arbolus
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#21
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#21
(Original post by redwood_phoenix)

For an idea of how much it's changed:

Lord's Prayer in Old English (the strange looking d is a 'th')
Fæder ūre, ðū ðē eart on heofonum,
Sī ðīn nama gehālgod.
Tō becume ðīn rice.
Gewurde ðīn willa
On eorþan swā swā on heofonum.
Urne gedægwhamlīcan hlāf syle ūs tōdæg.
And forgyf ūs ūre gyltas,
Swā swā wē forgyfaþ ūrum gyltendum.
And ne gelæd ðū ūs on costnunge,
ac alȳs ūs of yfele.
-
-
Sōþlice.
Father our, thou art in heaven
Let thy name be hallowed
We receive thine kingdom (compare "becume", "bekommen" and "rice", "reich")
Let be done thy will
On earth as is also in heaven
Our daily loaf sell us today
And forgive us our guilts
As we also forgive our guilters
And never lead thou us into temptation
But release us of evil
Soothly

The spelling and grammar may be very different, and there's quite a few words which have been completely replaced by the Romance versions. But given a bit of time it's still possible to understand.
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navarre
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#22
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Most of our vocabulary (60%) comes from French/Latin. Yet the most commonly used words are Germanic in origin.

Unlike the Romance languages, where native speakers can learn each others tongues with relative ease, the Germanic languages are currently very far apart. In English, where our grammar is truly unique and the vocabulary is a mash up, it's even harder to learn other Germanic tongues.
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redwood_phoenix
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#23
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#23
(Original post by navarre)
Most of our vocabulary (60%) comes from French/Latin. Yet the most commonly used words are Germanic in origin.

Unlike the Romance languages, where native speakers can learn each others tongues with relative ease, the Germanic languages are currently very far apart. In English, where our grammar is truly unique and the vocabulary is a mash up, it's even harder to learn other Germanic tongues.

Although from what I understand the North Germanic languages aren't so difficult for speakers of one language to learn the other. e.g. Swedish and Norwegian.

When I was at school I actually found it easier to learn French than German.
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navarre
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#24
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#24
(Original post by redwood_phoenix)
Although from what I understand the North Germanic languages aren't so difficult for speakers of one language to learn the other. e.g. Swedish and Norwegian.

When I was at school I actually found it easier to learn French than German.
French is classified as an easier language for native English speakers. We share a great deal more in common with French in terms of vocabulary, and though French and German grammar are both difficult, German grammar is the harder to learn.

North Germanic languages are generally mutually intelligible; however, German, Dutch and English are all incredibly different. Kinda hard to believe today that they were once the same language, and mutually intelligible.
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hsv
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#25
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#25
Sanskrit since both ate Indo European languages, if your really into this study Celtic studies with ,modules on the Celtic language at uni, e.g at Edinburgh, Aberwswyth or Cambridge Universities Anglo Saxon Norse degree
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