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    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    Imperial. It's a top research university on top of everything else. I'm bias though. It's also 12th in the world for Biological Sciences. http://www.topuniversities.com/unive...gical-sciences and 6th over all in the world http://www.topuniversities.com/unive...-rankings/2011 This may factor in job prospects, employers targeting the university, world-class research ect
    -2011 Rankings

    -Rankings themselves are subject to inherent bias

    Just saying.
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    (Original post by KatyJF)
    I also applied to Durham and Bristol, but neither were as good as Imperial or Manchester.




    The main issue I have with Imperial is the accommodation costs, which is why I am leaning towards Manchester, as it is so much cheaper. The Life Science Faculty at Manchester is huge, which brings the benefits of lots of choice regarding modules, placements as well as excellent facilities and academic staff. Manchester seemed friendlier than Imperial.
    However, Imperial has an excellent reputation and is in the science hub of the UK. The university gets lots of funding for research and is obviously very science-orientated!
    Lets not forget, Imperial give you 2400 pounds a year if your total combined home income is under 50,000. This grant goes up all the way to 60,000 EDIT* You get less as your income bracket is higher though.
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    (Original post by Transformational)
    Not going to indulge some of the more blatant misconceptions in this thread but I will say this, both Manchester and Imperial are Universities placed near the absolute pinnacle of Higher Education without question.

    Manchester has exceptional Biology facilities and very good job prospects for the course, especially given that the University works very closely with GlaxoSmithKline to produce the next generation of researchers and scientists in the subject, they pump so much funding into research intensive projects it is unreal and I would strongly recommend Manchester to any PhD student. This makes it a very strong pick for this particular course, and the poster prattling on about prestige needs to do some research into real world links that most modern Russell Groups have and that significantly benefit bright graduates. Infact, the real reason Manchester University isn't higher in Uni Rankings is because many undergrads get caught up in the atmosphere and culture of the city that they end up receiving the hard end of the stick from the University, lowering their satisfaction rating.

    Imperial however is the creme de la creme, especially in terms of name. It trades blows with UCL and LSE for the best overall London University but it has an unquestionably strong faculty. It lacks the practical links with big companies that Manchester has, but arguably makes up for it with just its name. It also receives a massive chunk of funding, though its mainly directed at its medical courses.

    Both London and Manchester are brilliant and colourful cities, I'd say Manchester is harder, streetwise and more open-minded, London is metropolitan and a bit more sophisticated I think, but thats just based on my personal stereotypes formed from spending time at both Universities.

    Where do you think you're going to have more fun? At the end of the day, a first from either Uni is still extremely good and will put you well above the vast majority of graduates. You might prize that lucrative relationship with GSK that Manc has, or you might have fallen in love with the brilliance that is Imperial.

    Good luck!
    Thank you for your post, it was really helpful! I totally agree, Manchester has incredible industry links - hearing about some of the placements that the students had secured was very impressive! Imperial is truly brilliant, and the South Kensington location - next door to the Science Museum, Natural History Museum and Hyde Park - is a big plus (but also means v.expensive! ).
    Spending time at both universities, I found that the lecturers at Manchester seemed much more approachable and friendly, whereas at Imperial, although still friendly, seemed as though they would have less time for their students as more focused on their own research.
    I love both universities, which is the real issue here!
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    (Original post by KatyJF)
    Thank you for your post, it was really helpful! I totally agree, Manchester has incredible industry links - hearing about some of the placements that the students had secured was very impressive! Imperial is truly brilliant, and the South Kensington location - next door to the Science Museum, Natural History Museum and Hyde Park - is a big plus (but also means v.expensive! ).
    Spending time at both universities, I found that the lecturers at Manchester seemed much more approachable and friendly, whereas at Imperial, although still friendly, seemed as though they would have less time for their students as more focused on their own research.
    I love both universities, which is the real issue here!
    Manchester in the past has had problems because many students complained that lecturers and tutors weren't accessible enough. This year they have doubled down on that problem and now all lecturers and Tutors have office hours most days of the week so that you can go in and discuss anything you like with them. They've done a pretty good job on it to be fair.
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    Every university in those lists above for graduate jobs has produced notable alumni. So ignore any "lalala has produced THREE more nobel prize winners than gagaga". It has nothing to do with your degree anyway.

    As for the whole "exclusive jobs at Imperial over lalala"...this is partly valid in fairness. I know for a fact, that Imperial offers exclusive graduate jobs that no other university does, but this is for engineering. That's because Formula One race teams perform wind-tunnel testing there, and so, engineering students are right in the buzz of it all. Yet again, you'd assume Manchester would have a lot of jobs in journalism/media due to the BBC HQ there. So the key point here is that each has positives. I have no idea about biology unfortunately, but don't be fooled into thinking one university offers all the good jobs. Likewise, don't be fooled into thinking that certain universities do not offer better graduate jobs in their specialized areas than others.

    TL;DR - If you're taking it at face value: Imperial.
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    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    Lets not forget, Imperial give you 2400 pounds a year if your total combined home income is under 50,000. This grant goes up all the way to 80,000. You get less as your income bracket is higher though.
    You're right, Imperial does have a very generous bursary scheme - more so than any other university I have applied too. I believe however the bursary goes up to a household income of 60,000, and I am marginally over this threshold, however that may change in later years. I think if I were to firm Imperial, I would look into sharing a room - which seems to be quite popular at London Universities - which will bring accommodation costs down. However, in the second and third years, when having to find private accommodation, the costs of this are my biggest worry!
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    (Original post by Dpdr)
    Every university in those lists above for graduate jobs has produced notable alumni. So ignore any "lalala has produced THREE more nobel prize winners than gagaga". It has nothing to do with your degree anyway.

    As for the whole "exclusive jobs at Imperial over lalala"...this is partly valid in fairness. I know for a fact, that Imperial offers exclusive graduate jobs that no other university does, but this is for engineering. That's because Formula One race teams perform wind-tunnel testing there, and so, engineering students are right in the buzz of it all. Yet again, you'd assume Manchester would have a lot of jobs in journalism/media due to the BBC HQ there. So the key point here is that each has positives. I have no idea about biology unfortunately, but don't be fooled into thinking one university offers all the good jobs. Likewise, don't be fooled into thinking that certain universities do not offer better graduate jobs in their specialized areas than others.

    TL;DR - If you're taking it at face value: Imperial.
    Imperial also specializes in medicine and biological sciences. It has one of the most thriving medical research organisations in the world. It is not just an engineering university.
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    (Original post by KatyJF)
    You're right, Imperial does have a very generous bursary scheme - more so than any other university I have applied too. I believe however the bursary goes up to a household income of 60,000, and I am marginally over this threshold, however that may change in later years. I think if I were to firm Imperial, I would look into sharing a room - which seems to be quite popular at London Universities - which will bring accommodation costs down. However, in the second and third years, when having to find private accommodation, the costs of this are my biggest worry!
    Mhm, I get you. For all the years you'll be at imperial - how much will you rack up more than at Manchester?
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    (Original post by KatyJF)
    Thank you for your post, it was really helpful! I totally agree, Manchester has incredible industry links - hearing about some of the placements that the students had secured was very impressive! Imperial is truly brilliant, and the South Kensington location - next door to the Science Museum, Natural History Museum and Hyde Park - is a big plus (but also means v.expensive! ).
    Spending time at both universities, I found that the lecturers at Manchester seemed much more approachable and friendly, whereas at Imperial, although still friendly, seemed as though they would have less time for their students as more focused on their own research.
    I love both universities, which is the real issue here!
    The museums definitely are one of the reasons I wanted to go there. I love watching nature shows , and actually being able to visit museums is a certain plus point. I would not assume anything about the lecturers to be honest. A lot of the lecturers are imperial, and probably Manchester are world leaders. Being taught by experts in your field who have access to the latest world-leading research by virtue of an incredible sum of money they are given to spend on research can only be a good thing.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    Imperial, without a shadow of a doubt.

    It's way more prestigious, has far better job prospects, you'll be amongst more intelligent, more motivated students.

    The only issue is cost/London, and that might tempt people into picking, say, Warwick/Durham/Bristol over Imperial, but Manchester is a step down from there.

    I would only have turned down Imperial for UCL/Oxford/Cambridge.
    That is the most stupidist thing I have ever read. No really, it is. I don't see how, so can you explain please.

    And instead of just negging me, try and formulate a coherent argument.
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    Who it produced in the past is somewhat irrelevant. Very few people will doubt that the average Imperial student nowadays will be smarter and better-trained than a Manchester student. There will be exceptions to the trend, like perhaps the OP, but the trend is very clear in academic achievement etc.

    I said that the only universities I would take over Imperial would be Cambridge/Oxford/UCL. Not necessarily for Biology (perhaps I wasn't clear) although I am aware that UCL is good for Biology.

    UCL is an example of where you might trade some enjoyability at university for slightly less prestige, so long as the drop is not too great - you can still access the same jobs from UCL as you can from Imperial. You cannot, however, from Manchester.

    I might pick UCL over Imperial for Medicine or some of the natural sciences, but I suppose that UCL's strengths in Economics, languages etc. are not even offered by Imp



    I've read the report, which is why I feel justified in criticising the table, as I believe it's very misleading.
    Like seriously, you are making yourself look stupid here. Do you have any evidence for that?
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    Manchester Is such large uni that it'll inevitably attract alot of recruiters
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    (Original post by MENDACIUM)
    Imperial also specializes in medicine and biological sciences. It has one of the most thriving medical research organisations in the world. It is not just an engineering university.
    Excellent. As I said, I have no idea about it's biology status, only engineering, so thanks for elaborating on that. Never said it was solely engineering. Now the OP knows ehy.
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    i am going to manchester life sciences (with year placement abroad), i think a lot of the people in this thread are looking from the perspective of employers in sectors such as law, investment banking etc. where of course you'd be crazy not to go for imperial. however manchester is a great uni when it comes to life sciences, when i have visited the department looks amazing. it also has the most funding. in the life science field there's much more emphasis on YOU rather than your university when it comes to employment, providing of course you are going to a "decent" uni.

    i didn't have the opportunity to apply for imperial as firstly i didn't get AAA and secondly they don't have the course i want to do... but if i had applied and recieved an offer i still think i would choose manchester.
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    (Original post by Fleurie)
    i am going to manchester life sciences (with year placement abroad), i think a lot of the people in this thread are looking from the perspective of employers in sectors such as law, investment banking etc. where of course you'd be crazy not to go for imperial. however manchester is a great uni when it comes to life sciences, when i have visited the department looks amazing. it also has the most funding. in the life science field there's much more emphasis on YOU rather than your university when it comes to employment, providing of course you are going to a "decent" uni.

    i didn't have the opportunity to apply for imperial as firstly i didn't get AAA and secondly they don't have the course i want to do... but if i had applied and recieved an offer i still think i would choose manchester.
    Fair enough Manchester is pretty decent too, and I hope you enjoy the course! Well done.
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    (Original post by Dpdr)
    Excellent. As I said, I have no idea about it's biology status, only engineering, so thanks for elaborating on that. Never said it was solely engineering. Now the OP knows ehy.
    I am bias had to rep mah uni! (to be hopefully) But yes, Manchester is brilliant too.
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    (Original post by the mezzil)
    Like seriously, you are making yourself look stupid here. Do you have any evidence for that?
    Well, I'm not.

    The evidence is in the stark contrast in grades, for a start. Then add the fact that the courses are more difficult at Imperial..
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    (Original post by the mezzil)
    That is the most stupidist thing I have ever read. No really, it is. I don't see how, so can you explain please.

    And instead of just negging me, try and formulate a coherent argument.
    Nice..

    Imperial students achieve better grades and study more difficult courses. They've probably done better to get to Imperial.

    Plenty of rankings

    Plenty of people I know didn't even consider Manchester as a fifth option, choosing, say, Oxford, Imperial, UCL, Warwick, Bristol.

    Average UCAS points of Imperial students: 553, vs. 421 at Manchester..
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    (Original post by SaraWarah)
    Well, I'm not.

    The evidence is in the stark contrast in grades, for a start. Then add the fact that the courses are more difficult at Imperial..
    what do you mean stark constrast in grades? manchester's average acceptance/offer grade is AAA, while imperial might throw in some A*, it is hardly a stark contrast.

    how do you know the courses are more difficult in life sciences? have you done equivalent degrees at both?
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    (Original post by Fleurie)
    what do you mean stark constrast in grades? manchester's average acceptance/offer grade is AAA, while imperial might throw in some A*, it is hardly a stark contrast.

    how do you know the courses are more difficult in life sciences? have you done equivalent degrees at both?
    This is the average UCAS points which students have when they arrive. Imperial students on average achieve way higher than their offer, at 553 points, whereas Manchester ones get 421.

    Cambridge offers are roughly the same as most other top RG unis, but their students arrive with significantly better grades. Oxford are at 572, Cambridge at 589 (with 600+ for several courses, for example).
 
 
 
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