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    I sympathise. I hate my job too. But put this into perspective. You've been there two months, you've barely started.

    I've been working for my company for six and it's only now I'm being given responsibilities to make me feel valued. I work in a different country where being white and female works against you. It's a totally different culture! It's hard, really hard. So I understand the square peg, round hole philosophy.

    The hours are crazy, I was scheduled to do 21 hours solid the other week (excluding the time it would take me to get to and from home). I had to man up and say no! I'm contacted for 45 hours.

    Whilst our office operates in English, for everyone other than me it is a second language so half the time I don't even know what's going on. Even in English they have different words for things and phrase things differently, and the accents are hard to navigate.

    It's also 30 degrees here, and there is no air conditioning in my office.

    I am looking for a new job and I've expressed my concerns with my mother and partner that I'm not really learning anything, just managing to get by. The thing is, an employer is looking for that golden bit of experience on the CV, so even if you're not getting along with your current job you'll be in a stronger position with 12 months experience. That's the hurdle, getting through the crap.

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by Dragonista)
    I am looking for a new job and I've expressed my concerns with my mother and partner that I'm not really learning anything, just managing to get by. The thing is, an employer is looking for that golden bit of experience on the CV, so even if you're not getting along with your current job you'll be in a stronger position with 12 months experience. That's the hurdle, getting through the crap.

    Good luck.
    There's always a ****ing hurdle. GCSE's, A levels, degree, interview, experience, sticking through the crap... when is it actually going to end? If all life is, is getting past hurdles and waiting until "everything gets better" then ****_that_****.
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    There's always a ****ing hurdle. GCSE's, A levels, degree, interview, experience, sticking through the crap... when is it actually going to end? If all life is, is getting past hurdles and waiting until "everything gets better" then ****_that_****.
    I'm not sure you're sufficiently talented to be able to take that view.
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    (Original post by Brevity)
    I'm not sure you're sufficiently talented to be able to take that view.
    That one-liner is meant to add precisely what to the discussion?
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    (Original post by MegM)
    That one-liner is meant to add precisely what to the discussion?
    A lighthearted rebuke to an over-entitled worldview, precisely.
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    Ah - light hearted. I see.
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    This is what happens when you do simply and average degrees. Grad jobs aren't exactly the greatest and the op has been sucked into it
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    There's always a ****ing hurdle. GCSE's, A levels, degree, interview, experience, sticking through the crap... when is it actually going to end? If all life is, is getting past hurdles and waiting until "everything gets better" then ****_that_****.
    What exactly were your aspirations with a Maths degree?
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    There's always a ****ing hurdle. GCSE's, A levels, degree, interview, experience, sticking through the crap... when is it actually going to end? If all life is, is getting past hurdles and waiting until "everything gets better" then ****_that_****.
    Exactly. Look deep inside yourself, question what you really want to do with your life, and once you finally make a decision, pursue your goal post-haste.

    Just my two-dollah.
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    (Original post by ledleyking123)
    What exactly were your aspirations with a Maths degree?
    Look, I just enjoyed my degree and loved doing it. I didn't do it because I wanted to get rich. That wasn't the end goal.

    Unfortunately, I'm now at a loss of what to do. I haven't left yet, so I've now stuck it out for about 5 months. I'm planning on just leaving at the end of my probation period, even if they plan on letting me go themselves.

    I guess I'm still concerned about what this will do for my future employment prospects. I literally took the first job that came my way, and they specifically mentioned that there would be no training, and I took it... what other option did I have?

    On the bright side, I now have almost half a year of experience. On the down side, I'm leaving.

    Is this going to improve my situation, or hinder it? I've got no idea.
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    Look, I just enjoyed my degree and loved doing it. I didn't do it because I wanted to get rich. That wasn't the end goal.

    Unfortunately, I'm now at a loss of what to do. I haven't left yet, so I've now stuck it out for about 5 months. I'm planning on just leaving at the end of my probation period, even if they plan on letting me go themselves.

    I guess I'm still concerned about what this will do for my future employment prospects. I literally took the first job that came my way, and they specifically mentioned that there would be no training, and I took it... what other option did I have?

    On the bright side, I now have almost half a year of experience. On the down side, I'm leaving.

    Is this going to improve my situation, or hinder it? I've got no idea.
    I know you hate it, but I would advise sticking it out a month or two after your probation period. If you leave after it, other employers might assume you were not retained.


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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    Look, I just enjoyed my degree and loved doing it. I didn't do it because I wanted to get rich. That wasn't the end goal.

    Unfortunately, I'm now at a loss of what to do. I haven't left yet, so I've now stuck it out for about 5 months. I'm planning on just leaving at the end of my probation period, even if they plan on letting me go themselves.

    I guess I'm still concerned about what this will do for my future employment prospects. I literally took the first job that came my way, and they specifically mentioned that there would be no training, and I took it... what other option did I have?

    On the bright side, I now have almost half a year of experience. On the down side, I'm leaving.

    Is this going to improve my situation, or hinder it? I've got no idea.
    If you really hate it that much you might as well leave, theres no point getting this stressed out over a job, it's not the end of your life if you leave. What about maths teaching?
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    Since when was a Maths degree not a useful degree to have? What sort of degrees guarantee a good job, anyway (besides Medicine)...
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    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    I know you hate it, but I would advise sticking it out a month or two after your probation period. If you leave after it, other employers might assume you were not retained.


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    I see your point and I agree. Surely there's two sides to every argument, though? What if employers see my CV and think, "oh, he was there for half a year, he's probably good, let's get him in for an interview".

    The employers that will instantly assume I was an idiot with anger issues (or something else that made me unemployable) aren't the ones I'd want to work for anyway, I guess.

    (Original post by deedee123)
    If you really hate it that much you might as well leave, theres no point getting this stressed out over a job, it's not the end of your life if you leave. What about maths teaching?
    I'm not sure how good I'd be at controlling a class. I enjoyed teaching at university, but somewhere along the line I seem to have lost my confidence in myself...
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    I see your point and I agree. Surely there's two sides to every argument, though? What if employers see my CV and think, "oh, he was there for half a year, he's probably good, let's get him in for an interview".

    The employers that will instantly assume I was an idiot with anger issues (or something else that made me unemployable) aren't the ones I'd want to work for anyway, I guess.



    I'm not sure how good I'd be at controlling a class. I enjoyed teaching at university, but somewhere along the line I seem to have lost my confidence in myself...
    You place too much faith in employers not make make assumptions. With so many applicants per place, they can afford to do so.


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    Hey OP, i just read this thread after recently starting a grad job i hate myself. Needless to say, i am also looking for advice on what to do. I graduated in july with a business management degree from a good london uni, and am currently on a graduate management programme for a large retailer. Thats the thing, Im working in retail, long hours that i really dont enjoy, work that someone without a degree can do and I dont want my boss's job, hence no wish to progress. Should i stick at it whilst i apply for grad schemes for next year or just quit straight up?

    Sorry for the long post, Im just utterly miserable after only one week. Thanks in advance for the advice.
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    (Original post by chocolatehunny)
    Hey OP, i just read this thread after recently starting a grad job i hate myself. Needless to say, i am also looking for advice on what to do. I graduated in july with a business management degree from a good london uni, and am currently on a graduate management programme for a large retailer. Thats the thing, Im working in retail, long hours that i really dont enjoy, work that someone without a degree can do and I dont want my boss's job, hence no wish to progress. Should i stick at it whilst i apply for grad schemes for next year or just quit straight up?

    Sorry for the long post, Im just utterly miserable after only one week. Thanks in advance for the advice.
    I have to tell you, I don't regret leaving. I left, slightly after my probation, worried about my future and utterly defeated.

    I can tell you that it was not worth the mental torture that you're put through, especially if you're the only one on your team; it's not nice and some environments really can be toxic.

    Having said that, I can tell you that I actually got a job offer today for a well-known financial institution, and I have an AC tomorrow (until the afternoon) and then another interview after that. None of these places seemed to mind that I left the other place to take up a simple job, and all I said in the interview was that I wanted a change in lifestyle. If you're the best candidate, they're not going to look at your past and think "nah let's pass on him", just because you've had a blip.

    Again, you need to have faith in yourself. You have to remember that leaving something that large will obviously impact you somehow, and your confidence will be shaken. The question, I suppose, as always, is whether you let it stay shaken, or if you rise above it and continue to fight for what you want.

    Forget the naysayers here. I proved them wrong, and you can too. Follow your gut, and don't give up on yourself, because other people will. Even strangers who have no idea who you are, nor your own work ethic or ambition.
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    (Original post by Dragonista)
    Good luck.
    What country are you working in ?
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    I have to tell you, I don't regret leaving. I left, slightly after my probation, worried about my future and utterly defeated.

    I can tell you that it was not worth the mental torture that you're put through, especially if you're the only one on your team; it's not nice and some environments really can be toxic.

    Having said that, I can tell you that I actually got a job offer today for a well-known financial institution, and I have an AC tomorrow (until the afternoon) and then another interview after that. None of these places seemed to mind that I left the other place to take up a simple job, and all I said in the interview was that I wanted a change in lifestyle. If you're the best candidate, they're not going to look at your past and think "nah let's pass on him", just because you've had a blip.

    Again, you need to have faith in yourself. You have to remember that leaving something that large will obviously impact you somehow, and your confidence will be shaken. The question, I suppose, as always, is whether you let it stay shaken, or if you rise above it and continue to fight for what you want.

    Forget the naysayers here. I proved them wrong, and you can too. Follow your gut, and don't give up on yourself, because other people will. Even strangers who have no idea who you are, nor your own work ethic or ambition.
    thats do refreshing to hear! Congratulations on your success. I'm planning on staying with the company but applying to grad schemes every day as they've only just opened up again. Hoping that I can still make some money etc whilst looking for a job that isn't soul destroying.

    Did you apply/have interviews for grad schemes or did you just apply for 'proper jobs'. Thanks for the kind words!
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    Also, when you say left the job to take up another one, what exactly do you mean? Thanks for the clarification


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