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The whole "study what you love" thing is stupid and unrealistic Watch

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    (Original post by Scotty Bear)
    But taxpayers are paying for students to study a degree which 1) is useless in the job world (regardless of interesting or not) 2) will never be paid back because you won't earn 21K+ working in a supermarket or the likes. I'm pretty sure I'd like to see my tax money fuelled into schools, hospitals etc and not going to someone who has an interest in something that they will never use
    The humanities subsidise expensive engineering/scientific equipment
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    (Original post by hermitthefrog)
    A lot of people don't necessarily plan to get a job in their subject. A lot of history students for example won't become a historian, they simply want a degree, because having one is helpful not just in getting any job but also climbing the career ladder. If they have a passion for a subject who are you to stop them paying 9k a year just because at the end of it they might not get a job in that field. So? A degree is a degree.
    Ok but its fair to say even from looking at this forum that there are a fair number of graduates without jobs or in jobs that they could have got without their degree (and who are obviously unhappy about this situation). Is it fair that they were advised so strongly to make their enjoyment the number 1 priority of their degree choice?
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    (Original post by combbrah)
    Ok but its fair to say even from looking at this forum that there are a fair number of graduates without jobs or in jobs that they could have got without their degree (and who are obviously unhappy about this situation). Is it fair that they were advised so strongly to make their enjoyment the number 1 priority of their degree choice?
    Yes there are, but I would suggest a lot of people in this situation perhaps don't have work experience, or haven't applied for enough jobs. You may have to apply for over 100, but eventually you will get something if you persevere. I would also say a lot of graduates won't take just any jobs, and have unrealistically high expectations about the sorts of jobs they will be going into after their degree. Relevant work experience I would say is JUST AS important as a degree, unfortunately a lot of people don't realise this until they leave university and go out looking for a job.
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    All degree's help employment prospect's ( just having a degree shows that you know how to work on your own etc.)
    If you don't study what you enjoy you won't want to do it, and it'll just cause problems. Plus there are nearly always jobs for each and every degree out there. The few really weird degree's maybe not but pretty much all degree's can have job's that would require that degree.

    Also the whole idea about going to university is to further yourself and you can only pass a course and get the degree at the end if they themselves actually apply themselves to the course and try to make anything out of it. No one really ever likes exams or essays but you shouldn't do them in a course you don't enjoy just because you might have a better chance in a job you couldn't care less about in the end. Life itself is about doing what you want. If you want all the money and the prestigious job then you subject yourself to that. If you happy doing a degree you like and being in a job you semi enjoy in the end then that's their choice.
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)
    The whole study for 3+ years in a subject you're not interested in to have a career that you haven't worked in before and then be forced to work in that career (because your degree isn't suited for other jobs and which you lack experience) for the next 50-60 years is stupid.

    In short: If you know you want a career in something: Do the relevant degree. If you fancy a decent well paid, interesting job anywhere, any degree is fine.
    You're painting the situation as though its black and white. Often, people have interests in more than one subject, so its not really a stupid idea to perhaps study a subject which is less interesting to them but would allow for greater job prospects than their 'preferred' course.

    Also, your advice at the end is very idealistic, its not a matter of wanting a career and getting it. In many job sectors the competition is fierce, A LOT of people will miss out on the careers they wanted even though they've done the relevant degree.
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    (Original post by combbrah)
    But as the above poster said, taxpayers are having to pay for this stuff. So I wouldn't really consider that a valid reason for going to university unless there's some serious return at the end of it. Not to mention, this is exactly what leads to the whole "college is useless" thinking that is so prevalent right now
    Well yeah, but I wasn't trying to say that learning to be independent was the only reason, obviously qualifications are the most important, but I think it I was just trying to say that there are more reasons to go to university.

    And yes he was fairly old, nearing retirement now I believe.
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    luckily im doing Physics at uni because i love it and the graduate prospects are pretty great too... but to be honest i think if u love a subject, just do it. Your more likely to get a first on a degree you love than one u don't and at the end of the day that is essentially all that matters (to yourself and employers in your respective field). Unless your one of those people who's primary goal in life is to make as much money as possible, in which case i feel sorry for you.

    Oh and i hate the way people honestly believe a degree in history is less credible than any other. The arts and humanities drive us forward and its the sciences that enable us.
    both are essential and neither one is more or less important than the other.
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    So, you suggest us to study something that would have the real benefit in regards of employment, even though knowing that we might hate that area just because we will get a job?

    I couldn't imagine myself doing Law or Medicine degree as I don't feel even a little bit of interest in these areas unless it's all about administration. That's why I chose the subject that I loved which is English language. And that's why I've studies Business with Translation for 3 years.
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    Yeah, like, what if you really love necrophilia?
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    (Original post by combbrah)
    Ok but its fair to say even from looking at this forum that there are a fair number of graduates without jobs or in jobs that they could have got without their degree (and who are obviously unhappy about this situation). Is it fair that they were advised so strongly to make their enjoyment the number 1 priority of their degree choice?
    The way things are going, regardless of what you want to do you'll need a degree to work in McDonalds. If Literature is your thing, do Literature.

    When it comes to job interviews, with hundreds of people applying for jobs, the ones with degrees go straight to the top of the list. A degree opens doors for you, after that it's all down to the applicant. Even if you have a first from Oxford, if you come across badly in the interview you won't be getting that job.

    It's the law of averages, of the thousands of students you graduate with, some of them will be unemployable or naive or optimistic with their career options after graduating. The later ones will be the ones who've failed to plan adequately for their next step in their lives.
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)

    When it comes to job interviews, with hundreds of people applying for jobs, the ones with degrees go straight to the top of the list. A degree opens doors for you, after that it's all down to the applicant. Even if you have a first from Oxford, if you come across badly in the interview you won't be getting that job.

    .
    I'd say it depends on the job. If it's a graduate job, then what degree/what uni/what class matters. If it's a standard job, experience and work ethic comes on top given that they are qualified to do the job (like if they're chartered).
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    I believe that if you are extremely good at something, ex: drama, art, music and you like it as well, then do it at university, and somehow you will eventually find a fulfilling career if you try hard enough. You can start up your own business: eg: sell art, sell music online. But if you are not really good at anything in particular, like me, then a solid degree with good job prospects is the way to go. I mean, I could study literature or languages at university ( I know 3) but I decided to study economics and politics instead. The work load would be roughly the same, but an economics and politics degree would open up so many doors, plus I would already have 3 languages on my CV.


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    I think most students appreciate all those points you made. I'm not sure why you're making such a huge fuss.

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    (Original post by combbrah)
    Whenever anyone asks for advice on what degree to choose, whether online or from careers departments etc, the typical advice given now is "study the subject you find interesting" as if that's the only important thing.

    Now whilst it's true that studying something you actively dislike would be a bad move, I think this whole line of thinking (which seems to be quite recent) is giving people seriously unrealistic expectations of university and the benefits that come from it, and to be honest, is massively misleading students

    Firstly, university exists to increase your employment prospects, I don't know why so many people dispute that. I find many subjects interesting, and love reading about them, watching debates about them, etc. But I'm not going to dish out £9000 a year plus living costs to study something "cause its interesting" when there is a massive amount of information you can learn by yourself, through the internet, books etc. The reason people go to university is to be able to "officially" say that they have studied a certain subject, ie. get a recognised degree, and the only possible motive for that would be to improve their position in the eyes of an employer, not to "learn interesting things".

    Secondly, a lot of people who decide to just "study what they like" and subsequently choose degrees with little employment prospects eventually find that the job they end up in (if they even get a job) won't have anything to do with their degree anyway. So many people who studied easy, soft subjects at university and now are working in bars or retail or something or perhaps can't even find work at all. So it's not like this "subject they love" is even a part of their career

    Finally, I think its fair to say that most average students don't really have huge amounts of passion for a particular subject. Every student hates exams, dislikes doing long sessions of work and would probably rather be doing 100 things over sitting at a desk revising or writing essays. So with all this in mind, would it not make so much more sense to advise prospective university students to make employment prospects the number 1 priority when it comes to choosing a degree?
    I see what you mean about it should be more than just enjoying a subject when choosing a degree but it is a pretty big deal imo.

    Like, you need to think about the bigger picture, you might really like something but is doing a degree in it really going to lead anything? I think it comes to when does a hobby become a career? Some people also need to remember that you can still do that 'thing' you LOVE and enjoy your job.

    I'll give you my personal experience. I am really into bodybuilding, I love everything about it from learning the science behind it all to all the different 'bro' stories, I've read huge books, learnt a lot, had quite a big effect on my life and it got to the stage where I considered doing a relevant degree in it to work in a sporty environment. I then looked through the different degrees and wherever I looked, I couldn't find that 'job of my dreams' the relevant careers were all like personal trainer, pe teacher, sports doctor, sports physiotherapy, sports therapy and with the exception of sports doctor and physio they all kind of sounded like I was wasting my potential you know? Like I'm in hell right now going through maths, physics and chemistry a-levels and for what? To become a personal trainer? No thank you. I'm sorry if I've offended any PTs but I hope you can appreciate my position from studying my subjects and just feeling like I'm wasting my potential. Oh yh and the sports doctor and sports physiotherapy careers, well firstly medicine is an extremely competitive field and to go into it when your only interested in a very small and new speciality seems very stupid IMO. Then physiotherapy, you've got to understand that it's a lot more than sports, contrary to popular belief and as I looked more into it, I just thought its not even the type of work that I'm going to enjoy so to trade in a rewarding job for a job that wasn't even what I enjoyed but very relevant to what I loved seemed stupid and in the end I just came to the conclusion, well I am in a very good position with my subjects, which I enjoy (not love) and I can get a very rewarding career with them (I've applied for chemical engineering) and at the end of the day lifting can still be a part of my life so it's the best of both worlds really.

    However, this was how it worked out for me, maybe you can find a job relevant to your passion and maybe your a bit more willing than me to take a chance and after all, if you do what you really love, you will become a master at it and you will end up being very successful and getting paid the big bucks but just be aware to look at the bigger picture and do the pros really weigh out the cons?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2L_cGjQSR80



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    If you want to study a subject because you love it, you're probably better off doing a BTEC or something
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    Sage words.

    They told me "study what you love", but my BSc in Pornography is opening precious few doors.
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    (Original post by combbrah)
    The reason people go to university is to be able to "officially" say that they have studied a certain subject, ie. get a recognised degree, and the only possible motive for that would be to improve their position in the eyes of an employer, not to "learn interesting things".

    ...Every student hates exams, dislikes doing long sessions of work and would probably rather be doing 100 things over sitting at a desk revising or writing essays.
    Speak for yourself. What about if employment is a secondary concern in your life, after learning? What about if you wanted to make your employment a form of learning (academia)? There's no better place to get the most you possibly can out of a subject than university. I'm going to be paying for access to the most learned people in my subject in the world.

    If you follow the maxim and choose to study a subject you truly enjoy (note: that doesn't mean the subject you enjoy the most; you have to actually really want to do it in itself, not just a bit more than all other subjects) then you would enjoy those things. An exam is just a more strictly regulated form of the work you normally do (essays, papers, etc.).
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    When people say that, i think the idea of balance between subject interest and employment prospects is implied.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    The humanities subsidise expensive engineering/scientific equipment

    How?
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    (Original post by Scotty Bear)
    How?
    as they charge £9k a year for a history degree as well as charging £9k a year for a engineering degree?
 
 
 
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