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    It's not "j'ai été en France depuis deux semaines" OP's suggestion of "Je suis en France depuis deux semaines" is correct. Where in English we would use the past "I have been in France for two weeks", in French the present is used when talking about a continuous action that is still valid at the time of speaking (which is why loads of French people make the mistake in English of saying "I am in England since two weeks")

    The only time you would use the perfect tense with depuis is when the action referred to is a completed one and not a continuous one e.g He has vomited 6 times since I've arrived (Il a vomi six foix depuis que je suis arrivé) vs. I have been here for 2 weeks (je suis ici depuis deux semaines) Can you see the difference between the two? In the first example the action of vomiting is finite (it occurred six times) while the second describes a continued action - I have been and still am here.

    Slightly more advanced examples in case you're interested:
    Negative constructions tend to favour the perfect: Je n'ai pas mangé depuis deux jours = I have not eaten in two days.

    However, the present can be used with negative constructions if you want to really emphasise the habitual nature of the action (normally with ne...plus) e.g. Je ne travaille plus depuis qu'il m'a quittée (I've not been working since he left me) Not working is now a habit that is unlikely to change, whereas as saying "Je n'ai pas travaillé depuis qu'il m'a quittée" does not necessarily imply a habit, but is merely commenting that I happen not to have worked since he left (but this may change).

    See here for more: http://lilt.ilstu.edu/jhreid/grammar/depuis.htm
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    (Original post by qwertyuiop1993)
    It's not "j'ai été en France depuis deux semaines" OP's suggestion of "Je suis en France depuis deux semaines" is correct. Where in English we would use the past "I have been in France for two weeks", in French the present is used when talking about a continuous action that is still valid at the time of speaking (which is why loads of French people make the mistake in English of saying "I am in England since two weeks")

    The only time you would use the perfect tense with depuis is when the action referred to is a completed one and not a continuous one e.g He has vomited 6 times since I've arrived (Il a vomi six foix depuis que je suis arrivé) vs. I have been here for 2 weeks (je suis ici depuis deux semaines) Can you see the difference between the two? In the first example the action of vomiting is finite (it occurred six times) while the second describes a continued action - I have been and still am here.

    Slightly more advanced examples in case you're interested:
    Negative constructions tend to favour the perfect: Je n'ai pas mangé depuis deux jours = I have not eaten in two days.

    However, the present can be used with negative constructions if you want to really emphasise the habitual nature of the action (normally with ne...plus) e.g. Je ne travaille plus depuis qu'il m'a quittée (I've not been working since he left me) Not working is now a habit that is unlikely to change, whereas as saying "Je n'ai pas travaillé depuis qu'il m'a quittée" does not necessarily imply a habit, but is merely commenting that I happen not to have worked since he left (but this may change).

    See here for more: http://lilt.ilstu.edu/jhreid/grammar/depuis.htm
    Thanks very much. That's very interesting (though a bit beyond my level atm).

    General question (my speech was delayed by one day- whew!)

    I am trying to say "my family is taking me to Paris..."

    I wrote: "ma famille me (something) a Paris..."

    What would I put in the place of "something"?

    Thanks so much everyone!

    Edit: is it m'emmener?
 
 
 
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