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    (Original post by 321zero)
    What would you, in figures, describe as 'extreme wealth'?
    I think if you have £10 million in pure cash as well as securities such as properties and investments at the same amount (totaling £20 million), that is extreme wealth.

    There are many ways in which to be wealthy. My parents have slightly above average income, but most of what they own is tied up in properties. It is still wealth, but you have to move things around to liberate cash.
    That is how most people are wealthy anyway. Very few have both securities AND loads of cash available.
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    The question should be - how did one acquire such wealth? Is it by fair , honest use of the rules? If so, there is nothing 'immoral' about it. If you're willing to go through the battle to get to where you want to get, who has got the right to stop you? Lets not forget, in the UK , the wealthy pay so much in Tax, perhaps 10-20 times our own actual salaries , depending on how much someone earns yearly. I'm not even rich by the way, or wealthy by any definition.
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    (Original post by Dejah Thoris)
    It's just semantics catering to the greedy. Having the means and yet failing to utilise it for the greater good is just as bad as acquiring said means via questionable methods.
    Interesting concept, but I disagree. If I own ten pounds and do not give any of it to charity, when I could afford to, that's not as bad as if I take ten pounds from someone who can't afford to lose it.
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    (Original post by Scumbaggio)
    I'm not sure about Bill Gates, microsoft had a monopoly on software for years.

    He'd probably still be massively wealthy if they hadn't but to say he deserves all the money he has accumulated isn't necessarily true.
    Technology is all about innovation, and when you have the most advanced stuff that people don't have, they're gonna want it. I think the guy did well and deserves what he made.

    He's got his own charity which raises ridiculous amount of money, he dedicates a lot of his time to solving problems like poverty/hunger/disease/education in 3rd world countries.. I read something about him only leaving his kids $10 million dollars, which is barely anything when you consider how much he has. He wants them to make something of themselves rather than live off his money. He's a good guy and I think he deserves to have earned so well for his hard work.
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    If we go with the assumption that wealth is finite, then having extreme wealth automatically implies that other people have more limited wealth. For that reason I see it as immoral to hoard wealth without redistributing it.
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    (Original post by ChocoCoatedLemons)
    Well, that's not really to do with morality, right?

    I don't think ambition and greed are mutually exclusive.
    I don't think I'd sleep comfortably knowing I had the means to make a sizeable donation to a hospital or to a charity or NGO and not do it.

    I don't think I'd have a leg to stand on telling a multi-millionaire that they are immoral if they paid their taxes and earned their wealth through legitimate means.

    Personally, knowing I had so much and those around me had so little, would make me feel pretty guilty if I didn't do something.
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    (Original post by RedArrow)
    Billionaires like bill gates and buffet and even Steve jobs deserves all the wealth they earned.
    But does any individual actually deserve TENS of BILLIONS of pounds?? I don't think so - no matter what they've done...
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    (Original post by 321zero)
    I don't think I'd sleep comfortably knowing I had the means to make a sizeable donation to a hospital or to a charity or NGO and not do it.

    I don't think I'd have a leg to stand on telling a multi-millionaire that they are immoral if they paid their taxes and earned their wealth through legitimate means.

    Personally, knowing I had so much and those around me had so little, would make me feel pretty guilty if I didn't do something.
    See, I feel guilty if I don't give to a charity when I walk past collectors. But that's not immoral of me. It'd be immoral if I grabbed their buckets and ran.

    I don't find it immoral as long as the methods were legitimate etc etc.

    All my opinion, of course.
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    (Original post by Rump Steak)
    But does any individual actually deserve TENS of BILLIONS of pounds?? I don't think so - no matter what they've done...
    Why not though? If they've earned it fairly, then it should be theirs to do with what they will.
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    Its not if you add value/produce stuff.

    For example the facebook creator can be as rich as he wants. Make an app that everybody buys, nothing wrong having a few million out of that.

    Its bankers wealth, which actually came out of conning everyone else out of money and making money up that is immoral.
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    (Original post by Rump Steak)
    But does any individual actually deserve TENS of BILLIONS of pounds?? I don't think so - no matter what they've done...
    In fairness to Gates, he does give a phenomenal amount away to charity. He has the sort of wealth where he can genuinely change people lives.

    I just find the idea of being mega wealthy bizarre. Why does anyone aspire to being infinitely more wealthy than 99.9% of their fellow human beings? Surely once you and your loved ones futures are taken care of, it is job done.
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    (Original post by ChocoCoatedLemons)
    Interesting concept, but I disagree. If I own ten pounds and do not give any of it to charity, when I could afford to, that's not as bad as if I take ten pounds from someone who can't afford to lose it.
    Good example, but I still believe the two are just as bad because if you don't give to charity when you can afford to you aren't elevating the same poverty that ultimately results from taking money from the needy. On the surface they appear unproportional but the ultimate outcome is the same - poverty/hunger. Giving to charity is a moral obligation that we all should abide by.
    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Ok.

    You don't need to ask a stupid question. Just get to the point.
    How is it a stupid question? If anything your entire premise was more idiotic than the question I asked which is very much valid you just don't want to admit it nor can you begin to answer it.
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    (Original post by ChocoCoatedLemons)
    See, I feel guilty if I don't give to a charity when I walk past collectors. But that's not immoral of me. It'd be immoral if I grabbed their buckets and ran.

    I don't find it immoral as long as the methods were legitimate etc etc.

    All my opinion, of course.
    Thanks for your input .

    I just wonder, if you have the means to make a significance difference and still remain wealthy for the rest of you life and choose not to, is that immoral? I think it may well be.
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    I find it interesting that the talk in this thread is aimed at those who buy Ferraris while others struggle for money and not the sort of average British student that buys beer and over priced junk food while others struggle for food. I think when you give so much to Oxfam that you have really altered your lifestyle you'll be in a better position to criticise people with more than you.
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    (Original post by Dejah Thoris)
    Good example, but I still believe the two are just as bad because if you don't give to charity when you can afford to you aren't elevating the same poverty that ultimately results from taking money from the needy. On the surface they appear unproportional but the ultimate outcome is the same - poverty/hunger. Giving to charity is a moral obligation that we all should abide by.
    One is directly hurting people, the other is not. Of course, this is all subjective, think what you like.
    There should never be an obligation to give up money that has been fairly earned with no benefit.
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    (Original post by 321zero)
    Thanks for your input .

    I just wonder, if you have the means to make a significance difference and still remain wealthy for the rest of you life and choose not to, is that immoral? I think it may well be.
    Nope, I don't find that immoral. Sure, it would be nice, but at the end of the day, you earned that money.
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    (Original post by Rump Steak)
    But does any individual actually deserve TENS of BILLIONS of pounds?? I don't think so - no matter what they've done...
    Why not?

    Say I invent a product - a kind of toughened metal, let's say - that is stronger and lighter than other metals on the market. Imagine it's a runaway success and is used in everything from aircraft chassis to engine parts to railway tracks.

    If people are willing to buy it from me and I am willing to sell it to them, at a price that is mutually agreed between buyer and seller, why do I not deserve the profits of my efforts?

    It's not as if I'd employ thousands of slaves to manufacture it and distribute it for me; every man I employed would be a volunteer that was paid a salary that I offer and that he accepts. He profits too, by selling his labour.

    The buyer profits because he regards my metal as more valuable than the money in his pocket; I create value for him with my invention.

    Tell me where the immorality arises?

    At which point to I cease to deserve the profit of my invention?

    You should read my longer post on page 1.
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    First of we need to define what immoral/ity is?
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    I wonder if the term "wealth" can be applied to other areas than money. For example, in the case someone who is very popular with an immense wealth of friends, more friends than they could ever need; is it immoral of them not share out their friends? Another example, someone who is loved an incredible amount by another, more than they will ever need; is it immoral of them not to shunt some of this affection towards others who do not have it?

    All the arguments of excessive wealth not being shared seem a bit socialist. If you work hard for your money then you should do what you want with it.

    Morals arise as a result of the interaction of one's ego and one's social group. It's questionable whether they even exist in the first place, and if they are important for those who have excesses of "wealth".
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    (Original post by 321zero)
    In fairness to Gates, he does give a phenomenal amount away to charity. He has the sort of wealth where he can genuinely change people lives.

    I just find the idea of being mega wealthy bizarre. Why does anyone aspire to being infinitely more wealthy than 99.9% of their fellow human beings? Surely once you and your loved ones futures are taken care of, it is job done.
    Obvious answer is obvious - so you can own more expensive items and materialistic goods.
 
 
 
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