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    (Original post by HandmadeTurnip)
    If you're already experimenting with programming and circuits, you're probably ahead of most applicants. The majority of my fellow first years are good at Maths and Physics but have never really encountered practical electronics.

    It depends what sort of areas you're interested in but I'd recommend getting an Arduino or something similar. It's a very affordable way of getting into programming and circuit design.
    Oh ok thanks! I recently got an arduino, and was enjoying learning about microelectronics.
    Just wondering, how would you know you would prefer electronic engineering (and not another engineering course) if you hadn't ever tried it?

    I'm aiming for oxbridge or just below that, so don't you think the other applicants would have a fair bit of engineering experience prior to starting? I heard they tend to focus on grades mostly at first though.
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    (Original post by Faded-Pi)
    I went on a broad-based headstart course and it was very helpful, definitely apply for one of them. For things to do you could find some circuit projects to complete- either following instructions online or buying kits (I bought a couple two years ago at maplin, but there's some online to buy too).

    Books wise you could try 'The Art Of Electronics by Paul Horowitz and Winfield Hill' and 'Electronics: A Systems Approach by Neil Storey' for electronics. You also might want to look into some engineering maths books.

    Other stuff you could do is watch some lectures (if you can find any related to the course) at any universities, watch documentaries on tv or read science magazines. For computer science specifically you'll be wanting to do some programming, assuming you haven't already.

    I wouldn't worry too much though, you have another year before you have to write it and a lot of the personal statements on here seem to be either really poor or outstanding. Plus, grades are the most important thing.
    :cool:[/SIZE]
    Firstly, did you know that you wanted to study electronic engineering before you went on the headstart course? As in i'm not completely sure which field of engineering I want to study - did this help decide - and do you therefore think the broad-based headstart course is a better option for somebody in my position?
    Also, do you know if it's possible to do multiple headstart courses if they are on different weeks - or do they only allocate one per applicant?

    I've basically done all the other things but i'll check those books and any others out.

    Thanks for the help
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    (Original post by James Hp)
    Oh ok thanks! I recently got an arduino, and was enjoying learning about microelectronics.
    Just wondering, how would you know you would prefer electronic engineering (and not another engineering course) if you hadn't ever tried it?

    I'm aiming for oxbridge or just below that, so don't you think the other applicants would have a fair bit of engineering experience prior to starting? I heard they tend to focus on grades mostly at first though.
    I guess it depends on the person but for me, I just did a lot of research into the various engineering fields and then chose the one that I found most interesting. When I think about a car, building or computer, for example, I'm much more drawn towards learning how the computer works and is made than the other two. A-level Physics can be a good indication of whether you'd enjoy it as well, assuming you took it. If you hated the electricity and magnetism parts of the syllabus, for example, you're probably not going to like studying EEE.

    I can't really speak for Oxbridge, but I wouldn't worry too much about getting experience before applying. My university could probably be classed as 'just below Oxbridge' but like I said before, the majority of us knew next to nothing about electronics when we started. The lecturers also base their teaching on the assumption that this is the case so they certainly don't expect you to have any experience.
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    (Original post by James Hp)
    Firstly, did you know that you wanted to study electronic engineering before you went on the headstart course? As in i'm not completely sure which field of engineering I want to study - did this help decide - and do you therefore think the broad-based headstart course is a better option for somebody in my position?
    Also, do you know if it's possible to do multiple headstart courses if they are on different weeks - or do they only allocate one per applicant?

    I've basically done all the other things but i'll check those books and any others out.

    Thanks for the help
    Had an idea of doing electronics, but thought I'd have more luck getting into a Broad-based course and wanted to double check that electronics was for me. Since we did a mechanical crane project which I didn't enjoy it certainly crossed mechanical engineering off the list. Then I did some soldering of a heart-rate monitor and I really enjoyed it, but the headstart course didn't complete confirm what I wanted to study. I was still thinking about Civil and Computer Science and it was only when I went to see open day introductions to them and EEE, that I decided fully what I wanted to do.

    So if you're not sure what field you want to go in I'd recommend a Broad-based course. The course is also useful to decide if engineering is for you; I know lots of my group decided they would rather apply for economics, physics, etc... as they didn't enjoy the course.

    Headstart courses are only one per person, so you won't be able to do multiple courses. Though, I don't know if you would be interested but you might want to look at 'Year in the Industry' by the EDT. Personally, it wasn't for me, as I want to do a sandwich year at uni instead.

    No problem, glad I'm helping someone.
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    (Original post by Sgt.Incontro)
    Hi all,

    Welcome to the Electrical & Electronic Engineering (EEE) thread!


    Everyone is welcome to post/chat here - whether you wish to study EEE in the future, you are a sparkie, enthusiast, hobbyist or whatever!

    Those wishing to study are welcome to post here for anything, including advice for personal statements!

    And for those already at uni, I'll begin by creating a list. Post where you are studying at, what year you're in, etc...

    Homework/assignment help is also welcome. :pierre:

    Join the group: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/group.php?groupid=2313

    List: (To be updated continuously)
    Do you know how to solve cube circuits?
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    (Original post by Chike)
    Do you know how to solve cube circuits?
    Ahaha EEE at Southampton?
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    (Original post by OllieGCSEs)
    Ahaha EEE at Southampton?
    Yes. First year. Did some googling and found an explanation that made sense. But my diagram looked a bit ****. Still submitted on time tho. You're a an MEng student right?

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    (Original post by Chike)
    Do you know how to solve cube circuits?
    The key to solving a cube circuit (with equal resistance values) is to notice that a lot of the corners will be at the same voltage and so they can be condensed into a single point.This is explained in more detail here:

    http://www.rfcafe.com/miscellany/fac...ations-256.htm

    For a cube circuit will different resistance values you can use the nodal analysis to solve the problem.
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    (Original post by Chike)
    Yes. First year. Did some googling and found an explanation that made sense. But my diagram looked a bit ****. Still submitted on time tho. You're a an MEng student right?

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    Yeah i'm a first year MEng Electronic Engineering! What are you studying?


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    • Thread Starter
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    Wow, this thread has really kicked off.

    (Original post by Chike)
    Do you know how to solve cube circuits?
    Haha, I am a third year student, but I have no idea what a "cube circuit" is lol. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by OllieGCSEs)
    Yeah i'm a first year MEng Electronic Engineering! What are you studying?


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    EEE. Is your name actually Ollie?

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    (Original post by Chike)
    EEE. Is your name actually Ollie?

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    Yeah! What's yours? How'd you find the test today?
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    Chike. I'm the silent black guy with an afro and glasses. Black jacket. Test was horrible tbh. Guessed like 10 questions

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    (Original post by Chike)
    Chike. I'm the silent black guy with an afro and glasses. Black jacket. Test was horrible tbh. Guessed like 10 questions

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    Oh right! I'll have to say hi sometime! Ahh unlucky, I'm a bit annoyed it's taken them this long to give us our results...
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    Anyone possibly help me with this?
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    What's the best university in my signature for EEE and why?
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    (Original post by iRaii)
    What's the best university in my signature for EEE and why?
    1st place is definitely Bristol, as for the rest, league tables should help decide. Bristol is a top university, and is renown for engineering disciplines.
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    Hey, so I'm in the first year of electrical engineering and so far it is pure theory which is to be expected. I was wondering when will I reach the breakthrough moment where I'll actually be able to design and make things and where everything I learn will click together? Also when will the hands on aspect of the course kick in usually?

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    (Original post by Yume)
    Hey, so I'm in the first year of electrical engineering and so far it is pure theory which is to be expected. I was wondering when will I reach the breakthrough moment where I'll actually be able to design and make things and where everything I learn will click together? Also when will the hands on aspect of the course kick in usually?

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    Where are you studying? People studying electrical at my uni have had 6-9 hours of labs every week since the first
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    (Original post by OllieGCSEs)
    Where are you studying? People studying electrical at my uni have had 6-9 hours of labs every week since the first
    Loughborough, we do have labs but they are nowhere near the stage where I'm actually capable of understanding how things are done.
 
 
 
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