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    (Original post by bestofyou)
    Haven't you looked into the like of WHO, UN roles eg UNICEF or things like that?
    I feel that many of those organisations, particularly UNICEF are just not that relevant. It sounds a bit harsh I suppose but having had a fair bit of experience with them, I think many of them do a minimal amount of good, if at all.

    The UN I think can at times be a great organisation but at the end of the day, you are not really 'contributing' that much. In many ways it is just a totally faceless organisation. I want to do something wherein I can directly help individuals (UNICEF etc in many cases simly hinder them), or something in the military. I suppose it is not really helping anyone in particular, but I love the thought of it.
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    (Original post by jamesrobbo1)
    I feel that many of those organisations, particularly UNICEF are just not that relevant. It sounds a bit harsh I suppose but having had a fair bit of experience with them, I think many of them do a minimal amount of good, if at all.

    The UN I think can at times be a great organisation but at the end of the day, you are not really 'contributing' that much. In many ways it is just a totally faceless organisation. I want to do something wherein I can directly help individuals (UNICEF etc in many cases simly hinder them), or something in the military. I suppose it is not really helping anyone in particular, but I love the thought of it.
    Yeah I agree, I had to do some coursework on what exactly these organisations contribute to the places they work and I had initially thought going into it I'd be writing some boring old piece on seeing improvements here and there. However was shocked to find out that organisations (particularly the World Bank which I singled out as one of the worst) do more harm than anything else.

    Where are you from then? Sounds like a few years in the military would be better. There is no guarantee that you'll be helping people as a barrister even if you made it anyway, just like the World Bank you could be doing more harm than good without knowing it, or even worse, doing it while aware of it. My aunt had a partner killing during the troubles in NI and while she never said I think that the lawyer must have got the killer off the hook as she sees lawyers in a very negative light indeed.

    You've got a great profile here, you'll find something you love without a doubt.

    On a side note to finish, who is to say you couldn't take up a role at one of the said organisations hoping to change what they are doing to make them more effective?
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    (Original post by jamesrobbo1)
    Hey!

    So I was just wondering how others gauge my chances of becoming a barrister.

    My A-Levels: BCD, History, Physics, Computing and A (AS Level) Biology

    Uni: Intl Relations with Mandarin, from Bath. Also note that I failed my first year (family issues). My second year was also not great due to wasting too much time on exta-curricular stuff, but my average this year is around 77%, i.e. I have improved massively. Basically I have not scored below 70% for the past two years. Unfortunately my previous year does not count to my degree (Erasmus), so rather than getting a First I will instead make a 2:1.

    My grades are obviously poor or average. I have though started an NGO, worked for a newspaper, managed a bar, and played a Sport.

    I have been on ERASMUS to Finland for a year. Took part in a two month long exchange to Taiwan as well.

    Do I stand any chance of making it to the Bar? Are my grades just too poor?

    Please be honest and critical. I do not want to waste money on the GDL and BPTC and end up failing due to things that are now beyond my control.

    Thanks for any advice and critique!
    All top chambers require AAB when recruiting for pupilages, even lower tier firms still turn down people with ABB so I would say you could end up wasting a lot of money.
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    (Original post by bestofyou)
    Yeah I agree, I had to do some coursework on what exactly these organisations contribute to the places they work and I had initially thought going into it I'd be writing some boring old piece on seeing improvements here and there. However was shocked to find out that organisations (particularly the World Bank which I singled out as one of the worst) do more harm than anything else.

    Where are you from then? Sounds like a few years in the military would be better. There is no guarantee that you'll be helping people as a barrister even if you made it anyway, just like the World Bank you could be doing more harm than good without knowing it, or even worse, doing it while aware of it. My aunt had a partner killing during the troubles in NI and while she never said I think that the lawyer must have got the killer off the hook as she sees lawyers in a very negative light indeed.

    You've got a great profile here, you'll find something you love without a doubt.

    On a side note to finish, who is to say you couldn't take up a role at one of the said organisations hoping to change what they are doing to make them more effective?
    Thanks for the counsel bestofyou, always good to get some outside help. What you say about law is true, I think if I am honest with myself I am perhaps a little too idealistic, even naive. Hope the coursework you refer to went well!
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    (Original post by millie-rose)
    All top chambers require AAB when recruiting for pupilages, even lower tier firms still turn down people with ABB so I would say you could end up wasting a lot of money.
    Seriously disappointing but nonetheless, appreciated. I think I needed to hear this. I have virtually no family finance so if I would risk it it would all be off my own back.
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    (Original post by jamesrobbo1)
    Seriously disappointing but nonetheless, appreciated. I think I needed to hear this. I have virtually no family finance so if I would risk it it would all be off my own back.
    I know it's unbelievable that it's that competitive, but especially for barristers when pupilages are so scarce and you have serious competition. The majority are likely to have AAB as a minimum and you therefore won't even get to the interview stage.

    However, you do have other options!!

    - pupilage abroad?
    - train as a solicitor? they are still highly picky but if you apply to small town firms you can maybe get in as you did go to a very good university and then work your way up? perhaps then start your own practice?
    - train as a paralegal.. get a job in a chambers/firm/etc. then after working convert and take solicitors exams... because you worked there it MIGHT be easier for you to receive a training contract.
    - do one year a levels and retake? if you got your grades to AAB after that you'd be on a pretty good path with a respected degree and A levels that meet the requirements. I know retaking A levels doesn't sound amazing, what about doing them learn by home so it's in your own time and you can work as something else in the meantime?
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    (Original post by millie-rose)

    However, you do have other options!!

    - pupilage abroad?
    - train as a solicitor? they are still highly picky but if you apply to small town firms you can maybe get in as you did go to a very good university and then work your way up? perhaps then start your own practice?
    - train as a paralegal.. get a job in a chambers/firm/etc. then after working convert and take solicitors exams... because you worked there it MIGHT be easier for you to receive a training contract.
    - do one year a levels and retake? if you got your grades to AAB after that you'd be on a pretty good path with a respected degree and A levels that meet the requirements. I know retaking A levels doesn't sound amazing, what about doing them learn by home so it's in your own time and you can work as something else in the meantime?
    Those are all terrible suggestions. Just no.
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    If I am honest with myself I don't I would at all be interested in work as a solicitor - Advocacy is what I really want to be doing. Vis a vis paralegal: As arrogant and stuck up as it sounds, I dont think I would have the patience nor interest to do that and then work as a solicitor.

    I think my only option is to redo A Levels - but from what I hear retaking them now might not be considered so highly.

    I do have other interests, in fact they may well be more suited to me. I just want to know which ones I can take off the table essentially...This certainly is not a determination to work in law at any cost - more a determination to do a specific kind of thing in law.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    Those are all terrible suggestions. Just no.
    They are only aimed at allowing the OP to see that his a level results aren't the end of his career in law.
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    (Original post by jamesrobbo1)
    If I am honest with myself I don't I would at all be interested in work as a solicitor - Advocacy is what I really want to be doing.
    Most solicitors working in crime will be doing advocacy at least 3 days out of five each week.

    However, you are by no means a shoe in for a training contract anywhere.

    My view is that you should go off and do another career for at least 5 years. Then do a senior status law degree somewhere decent. By that point no-one is going to car every much what you achieved in your first year undergraduate studies in an irrelevant subject a decade before.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    How did you get from here:



    To here:
    :rolleyes:

    typing.
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    As nulli tertius correctly mentions, your best chance is to find something that interests you as much as advocacy and law, dedicate yourself to it, do great and try again in a couple of years. However, even then no one can guarantee that you'll be successful. The Bar is a fiercely competitive area and you need a lot of luck even if you have stellar academics.

    If you decide to take that path, I would suggest you reconsider your views about becoming a solicitor or paralegal. Not that that will be easy given your qualifications so far, but it would be a start since you will be able to get relevant experience and contacts.
 
 
 
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