Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mikeyup)
    Hello,

    the reason I find that I am unlucky is that I am getting interviews. Its just that there is always someone there who beats me.
    With the last Job I was one of two people to be interviewed but I was piped to the post.
    For another one I was one of only three people who made it.

    I am making it to interview but the trouble is I am not the most chatty or good looking of people. Well, I am good looking haha, but I feel that my communication skills let me down.

    Having said that, in the last two jobs they were good and I appeared to have spoken like I knew the employers for years.

    Maybe the trick is to keep applying and hope that I can beat the others.

    I am wondering though what the others have that I do not. In the work I do I have done very well - very very well, but I cannot show these skills to employers until they employ me.

    Is there also a way of showing an employer how good you are without doing work experience. I can tell them loads of times that I am good but I feel they need to see it. If they employed me they would see how good I can be but I don't get to that stage.

    Oh well, I will keep applying. By the way, I live in London and did my degrees in Music. Don't laugh - the field I chose is one in which there is a shortage of people. There is a dedicated website called Musicjobsuk which has all the music jobs on there and there are about 20 a day!

    Yes its a long shot applying to do music and I should be applying to work in other fields - I applied three times for Morrisons...look what happened.

    All the people I see in these shops are lively bubbly people who smile and joke and dance on the table at the office party! I am the quiet one who believes that I am there to work and work is what I will do.
    I can be very bubbly and am very funny (so my friends say) but my current situation is making me depressed and its rubbing off on the interviews!

    The highlighted areas are why you are not getting a 'menial' job. I worked in a shop for six months and we got a huuuugge number of CVs. They all said the same thing. Everyone had a degree. Everyone had a wealth of largely irrelevant experience. Seriously, the only thing to differentiate you from everyone else is your personality. You have to present yourself as someone that the person taking your CV/interviewing you would want to work with.

    I think that's probably the case for graduate jobs too. I'm pretty sure that I only got a graduate job because I was friendly and confident at the interview. I have no skill relating to tax, no experience of office work yet for some reason I got the job. The only thing I believe I had over other candidates was experience in retail giving me an idea what employers actually look for when they are hiring....someone that they want to work with!

    Edit: I have a list of common mistakes that people made when they were looking for retail work if you want to see it? It seems like really obvious stuff which is why I am reluctant to post it! I don't want to belittle anyone by making such obvious suggestions but they were very, very common mistakes..
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You're not alone, I've also experienced some of the things you mention and can't seem to find any sort of job - high powered or menial. I have also have a strong academic record and I feel discouraged, unlucky and useless each time I'm rejected. There are some things to consider:

    . You might be over-qualified. Hiring costs time and money and employers want to be sure that you won't jump ship as soon as something better comes along.
    . Stand up for yourself: if you feel that a basic literacy and numeracy assessment is a waste of your time given your obviously strong academic background, say so. Also bear in mind that job-seeking advisers are trying to justify their position as much as you are yours - if you're not getting much response they may suggest you make changes to your CV, go on a key skills course etc.
    . It doesn't sound like you're making enough applications given the competition for places. I consider myself lucky if get a response from one application out of twenty.
    . You say you spent a lot of money on travel to interview. Do you think there is a possibility that distance was a factor in the employer's decision? I've found that some employers don't have patience for candidates who need to relocate and aren't available to just drop-in at short notice. If you get called to interview, have a solid relocation plan in mind and use the distance as evidence of how serious you are about the job.
    . Selling yourself is a skill in itself. You may be highly intelligent, experienced and ultimately the best person for the job but you only get a few minutes or a short cover letter to convey that to the employer. Go all out. Seriously. Research the company, compliment them, talk about how passionate you are and how you really want to work with them. Ask what their idea of an ideal candidate is and then explain why you're the embodiment of that ideal.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mikeyup)
    Can someone tell me what is going on? Am I just unlucky? Am I meant to find work?
    Are you willing to do any kind of work? There are "**** jobs" about - just many people don't want to do them. There are often a lot of applications for places like Costa Coffee and so forth and because of this not everyone gets in, just statistics really. When I worked at a supermarket EVERYONE who applied got a job. That was back in 2003, though. Nowadays you get at least 10 applying for a shelf stacking job.

    The problem with ****ty jobs is they don't pay a decent living wage anymore. Prices for everything have doubled in the same time wages have gone up about 15%. That creates a problem for entry level workers, where as people who have already worked their way up feel less of a pinch.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Salapanda)
    The highlighted areas are why you are not getting a 'menial' job. I worked in a shop for six months and we got a huuuugge number of CVs. They all said the same thing. Everyone had a degree. Everyone had a wealth of largely irrelevant experience. Seriously, the only thing to differentiate you from everyone else is your personality. You have to present yourself as someone that the person taking your CV/interviewing you would want to work with.

    I think that's probably the case for graduate jobs too. I'm pretty sure that I only got a graduate job because I was friendly and confident at the interview. I have no skill relating to tax, no experience of office work yet for some reason I got the job. The only thing I believe I had over other candidates was experience in retail giving me an idea what employers actually look for when they are hiring....someone that they want to work with!

    Edit: I have a list of common mistakes that people made when they were looking for retail work if you want to see it? It seems like really obvious stuff which is why I am reluctant to post it! I don't want to belittle anyone by making such obvious suggestions but they were very, very common mistakes..
    I would quite like to see the list of common mistakes if you don't mind posting?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    20 jobs in a year is not enough. If you are serious about getting a job then you should be doing 5-10 good quality applications a week. That is the entire problem with you finding a job.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Enavor)
    Two degrees from university? Perhaps you're overqualified for the jobs you're applying to.
    Agreed
    Can I ask what degrees?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mikeyup)
    Hello...

    My name is Michael and I am going to be listing various things in bullet points after which I need some help.

    • I have two degrees from university
    • a wealth of experience
    • odd bits of part-time work that have not paid well
    • applied for a 3 jobs at Morrisons and was told I was not successful
    • Gave up applying for menial jobs so applied for something more challenging that would require my degree but still got no jobs
    • got an interview for a job and would have got the job but at the last minute another position became vacant so the scrapped my position as they needed the other one more importantly
    • signed up to the job centre
    • Am 25 years old and living at home
    • the job centre put me, a 25 year old with a MA degree on a course full on 17-18 year olds in which we would learn 'key skills' to help you find work. When I spoke to the leader of the course, after completing a 10 page SIMPLE English and maths test (which some failed to get right??), she told me I had a degree and wondered why I was on this course with such high qualifications
    • applied for voluntary work at Banardos only to be given a 5 page application form, after which I didn't get the job
    • went with the principal of its who you know not what you know. Found and job and strangely my referee knew the employers personally (family related) but I still didn't get the job. My referee and employer have fallen out of me not getting it!
    • went to apply for the graduate fast scheme with the civil service but found the maths and English tests too hard for me and failed it
    • applied for the general civil service but failed the competency questions
    • sent of 20 applications this year, 5 of them got acknowledged
    • asked my friends who work in places if there is anything going but 1 said they wouldn't want you to work with them, and the others seemed to have forgotten I asked. I chased them up to which they replied, there is no jobs going.
    • have people always telling me that something will come up. It never has
    • My dad who has a very high up job and is one of the best CV writers/interviewers around has been writing all my CV's to make then sellable but its not worked.
    • I spent £250 traveling to a job interview that wasn't successful and I didn't get the money back
    • I am poor, broke, 25 and living at home with my parents


    Can someone tell me what is going on? Am I just unlucky? Am I meant to find work?

    Help!

    Why don't you write the CV yourself? It's better they know you, as they are employing you and not your father.

    Just wondering...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Suzanne123)
    I would quite like to see the list of common mistakes if you don't mind posting?
    When I finished University I got a job in a shop. I worked in the shop for six months before getting a 'proper' job and in those six months we hired seven new members of staff. Based on my experience of working in a shop where we had many many people coming in looking for a job here are a few tips if you are going into a shop and applying for a job. These aren't things that happened once or twice...they were very common things people did that caused all the sales assistants to laugh and put your CV in the bin as soon as you left:

    1. Don't demand to see the manager and then stand there silently while the sales assistant runs around looking for the manager thinking you are a dissatisfied customer. It amazed me how many people did this...if you really think your application will be helped by talking to the manager (which, in the place I worked anyway, it rarely was), tell the sales assistant that you are looking for a job and ask whether the manager/supervisor will be on the shop floor somewhere.

    2. Do be friendly to the sales staff. Hand them your CV, smile and act like a person that they will want to work with. I think most shops have a system where the person who takes the CV puts a rating on it (we did smiley faces if the person was nice, put it in the bin straight away if they were grumpy). When we were hiring our manager would interview anyone that we said was nice enough to deserve an interview. Retail is basically just being friendly and you need to show that from the moment that you walk into the store. It is not a good look if someone comes up, hands you a CV without looking you in the eye or smiling and mumbles that they are looking for a job. You have to be confident and friendly. All the CVs essentially said the same thing, it was personality that got you an interview and eventually a job.

    3. Do not put every tiny achievement on your CV. A single page detailing relevant experience is plenty, if you don't have much/any retail experience write a paragraph at the top explaining that and saying how your character is suited to retail: friendly, willing to work hard, confident etc. then list any work experience you do have, always trying to relate it back to working with people and customer service. If you are really stuck, include aspects of your education such as working in a team to complete a project (team work), giving presentations to your class (confidence), babysitting your little brother or sister (organisation and responsibility) etc. Obviously, if you have enough work experience to fill up a page do not put these things on page two...We hired a guy who had no retail experience just because he had a really positive attitude and the manager felt he would fit in well with everybody.

    4. Don't worry about being over-qualified. Pretty much everyone at the shop I worked had a degree. I was very honest with the manager at my interview, I told him that I was planning on working in retail for six months - a year, and it didn't matter. If you are really worried that this will prevent you from getting a job, apply to places at the end of August/beginning of September and ask about Christmas temp jobs.

    5. If you ask the sales assistant if they are hiring and they say no, there isn't that much point leaving your CV. I guess it depends on the shop but from my experience speculative CVs just get lost and unless the CV really stands out we won't remember what you were like so your CV will not be picked for an interview. Just keep going around shops asking if they are hiring.

    To be honest I think all unskilled jobs are offered based mostly on personality. Even my graduate job, I think I only got that because I was friendly and confident. Lets face it, most of us have no real skills or experience so what is left: your personality. Let it shine through and eventually someone will say yes to you.

    Sorry if that was too long! It really frustrated me when people would come in looking for a job with such a bad attitude. I don't know about other shops but when we were hiring the manager would interview pretty much anyone who we said seemed nice.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Salapanda)
    When I finished University I got a job in a shop. I worked in the shop for six months before getting a 'proper' job and in those six months we hired seven new members of staff. Based on my experience of working in a shop where we had many many people coming in looking for a job here are a few tips if you are going into a shop and applying for a job. These aren't things that happened once or twice...they were very common things people did that caused all the sales assistants to laugh and put your CV in the bin as soon as you left:

    1. Don't demand to see the manager and then stand there silently while the sales assistant runs around looking for the manager thinking you are a dissatisfied customer. It amazed me how many people did this...if you really think your application will be helped by talking to the manager (which, in the place I worked anyway, it rarely was), tell the sales assistant that you are looking for a job and ask whether the manager/supervisor will be on the shop floor somewhere.

    2. Do be friendly to the sales staff. Hand them your CV, smile and act like a person that they will want to work with. I think most shops have a system where the person who takes the CV puts a rating on it (we did smiley faces if the person was nice, put it in the bin straight away if they were grumpy). When we were hiring our manager would interview anyone that we said was nice enough to deserve an interview. Retail is basically just being friendly and you need to show that from the moment that you walk into the store. It is not a good look if someone comes up, hands you a CV without looking you in the eye or smiling and mumbles that they are looking for a job. You have to be confident and friendly. All the CVs essentially said the same thing, it was personality that got you an interview and eventually a job.

    3. Do not put every tiny achievement on your CV. A single page detailing relevant experience is plenty, if you don't have much/any retail experience write a paragraph at the top explaining that and saying how your character is suited to retail: friendly, willing to work hard, confident etc. then list any work experience you do have, always trying to relate it back to working with people and customer service. If you are really stuck, include aspects of your education such as working in a team to complete a project (team work), giving presentations to your class (confidence), babysitting your little brother or sister (organisation and responsibility) etc. Obviously, if you have enough work experience to fill up a page do not put these things on page two...We hired a guy who had no retail experience just because he had a really positive attitude and the manager felt he would fit in well with everybody.

    4. Don't worry about being over-qualified. Pretty much everyone at the shop I worked had a degree. I was very honest with the manager at my interview, I told him that I was planning on working in retail for six months - a year, and it didn't matter. If you are really worried that this will prevent you from getting a job, apply to places at the end of August/beginning of September and ask about Christmas temp jobs.

    5. If you ask the sales assistant if they are hiring and they say no, there isn't that much point leaving your CV. I guess it depends on the shop but from my experience speculative CVs just get lost and unless the CV really stands out we won't remember what you were like so your CV will not be picked for an interview. Just keep going around shops asking if they are hiring.

    To be honest I think all unskilled jobs are offered based mostly on personality. Even my graduate job, I think I only got that because I was friendly and confident. Lets face it, most of us have no real skills or experience so what is left: your personality. Let it shine through and eventually someone will say yes to you.

    Sorry if that was too long! It really frustrated me when people would come in looking for a job with such a bad attitude. I don't know about other shops but when we were hiring the manager would interview pretty much anyone who we said seemed nice.
    Thanks!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    OK PEOPLE LISTEN UP! This will be a long reply but it is needed. Having read all your replies, I need to say my bit.

    Firstly, a question. Everybody says it is all about personality. That is why my brother is the head of the Menswear dept in Debenhams Basingstoke, and is in his 5th year of being with his girlfriend. That's why he has friends and goes out and socialises.

    I'm just not that confident around people. Having suffered from Aspergers Syndrome when I was younger, things haven't been easy for me. I was bullied at school by my whole class. Attacked and beaten for money by someone. Even now, when I walk down the street at 24 years old, I get looks from people - young people who could be my co-workers! And, this says something. The people (well one person) on here don't even know me, yet are subjecting me to what I call abuse. Swearing at me and having a go at me as If I am the Boston Marathon Bomber. All my with the exception of University, I have been subject to abuse and bullying and it has knocked me back. Made me hate working with people. I **** myself for weeks before university, wondering how a non-drinker, who had never had sex or a relationship or had real friends would cope. Finally I think I am getting somewhere and making progress and would appreciate posters here not knocking me down.

    I am a nice person. Happy. Positive. Funny. The way I word things may give people the wrong impression and I am so sorry for that. Now lets move on...

    It was only once I went to University that I really found solace. Everyone loved music and we behaved like adults. Everyone no matter what your personality type was accepted. I may not have been the most sociable but I was certainly one of the most talented musicians.
    Ok, I don't drink, so count me out of parties involving drinking games, though I still like parties and socialising and going out even though I don't drink.
    Ok, I am gay, so count me out of Lads nights out. Football. Curry and a pint.
    Ok, I am quiet. Shove me in a group and people forget I am there.
    Ok, my relationships ended because I couldn't communicate what I wanted in words. I was and still am, not good at reading into things and taking hints and therefore my partners just gave up.

    BUT, surly this shouldn't stop me from getting a job? I sometimes walk into retail shops and see the young staff working there - the ones that look like the 'lads' and think 'these were the people that used to bully me' and 'they are so different than me - I wont fit in'

    My brother had to do some group tasks for his interview. Now I am not saying I cannot do group tasks but...

    I have consistently been picked last for the team
    I am the quiet one who doesn't contribute much due to my personality/Aspergers, which has almost gone but still left a mark
    I am the one who doesn't get invited to nights out or social events
    HOWEVER, I often have the best ideas that could win it for the team but I just find it hard to get those ideas to the forefront when everyone is shouting and butting in.

    If anyone has experiences in this area, and can help in a non judgmental way please do. Don't contribute if you are going to pick holes.

    Second - those people that say you apply for 500 jobs or so. Surly you are not qualified for all of them? How are you finding 500 jobs in the area you can reach?

    I don't drive as I failed my test 7 times and the jobcentre doesn't give me enough money to look at driving and getting a car and my parents are not prepared to give me anything since I failed my MA degree, which was a £10,000 of their money down the drain.

    Looking at the musicjobs site for example, here are some of the jobs....

    Sales executive with sales experience - I have none
    Viola and Violin player - I don't play those instruments
    Department Assistant, work experience in music publishing is essential - guess what? I have no experience
    Principal Horn for an orchestra - I don't play the horn
    Senior publicist with three year experience in the field - I have no experience
    Visiting Music teacher with teaching experience and SEND - I have no teaching experience and don't know what SEND is.

    You get the idea. There are jobs I am applying for but as usual, someone with better experience gets the job. I have tried volunteering but there are not opportunities in my area and I cannot afford to commute/move house.

    Now, I would love to be proactive and apply for 500 jobs but I am not sure if it is best to apply for jobs you are not qualified for or jobs you are. If we go with jobs you are then cut the list down to 20.

    This new programme on channel 4 called 'The Intern' gives people the opportunity to work in big companies. These people have not really got much experience of work but. The companies clearly state that they only accept people with experience but take on 'The Inters' themselves. One of them at the end is offered a job and the employer looks surprised when he/she finds someone with no related experience who is just as capable of doing the job as someone with experience.

    I am that Intern looking to make it In the world. No one seems interested. I go to people for support and they don't help.

    Now, for the final word. Some of you have been telling me to stop moaning and get on with things. I can't see what else there is I can do.

    I would like the posters to give me a list of 10 different things to do in the next 7 days which might aid me in getting a job apart from the regular applying for work. I will do them and let you know how I get on. Suggest anything that you think might help. It will give me something to do and also give me new ideas for job hunting.



    Sorry for the long post in which I moan and rant and rave as if I am the only one with these problems. I am not.

    Thanks for your help.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    OK, move away from music jobs. As an industry it’s too restrictive and clearly the ongoing recession has created a glut of experienced musicians. They are in the line right above you. Ten things you should do for this week:
    1. http://www.milkround.com/graduate-em...aduate-scheme/

    2. http://www.w4mpjobs.org/JobDetails.aspx?jobid=39866

    3. http://www.w4mpjobs.org/JobDetails.aspx?jobid=39819

    4. http://www.w4mpjobs.org/JobDetails.aspx?jobid=39827

    5. http://www.w4mpjobs.org/JobDetails.aspx?jobid=39782

    6. Scope out demand for private music teachers in your local area. Piano or guitar or whatever you play. Put up posters in shop windows with tear-off strips at the bottom. Offer to do a first lesson free or whatever you can to get the ball rolling and gain some clients.

    7. Get into the psyche of moving out. Sorry, but you have to do it. Move to London for a week and stay in a cheap hostel – walk round all the big shopping centres and hand in your CV – particularly in music shops. Sell yourself in the way Salapanda advises above.

    8. There are ALWAYS opportunities to volunteer. After the huge cutbacks to statutory services the country is desperate for volunteers. From my own job, I can tell you that law centres and CABs will almost certainly take on a graduate who is willing to help with the admin burden. Type “volunteer in [your hometown]” and go from there.

    9. Your parents have funded you £10,000 for an MA. They can probably afford to support you through the next few months even if you’re working unpaid. Talk to them about it and assure them that you are redoubling your efforts to find work.

    10. This is a frustrating situation. I was there 6 months ago (with, sorry to say it, a fair bit of work experience). You need to channel the frustration into proactive effort, not mope around.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Hey,

    I haven't read through all of these responses. However, I got the general gist of what you are saying:

    I'm sorry that you find it difficult to gain employment because of your communications skills. You mentioned you have Aspergers, which might very well cause difficulties with you acting 'bubbly' in interviews. All I can suggest is practice with a friend or relative faking an outgoing personality. For example, although I don't have Aspergers, I am very introverted and have relatively few people I connect with, and find it painful forcing conversation with people. However, at group interviews, I just forced myself to fake an outgoing personality. It's horrible but just something you might have to do. Some things to make sure you do are always smile, nod, and have lots of things to say in response to any comments. If you are in a group interview and someone makes a comment, try and respond to their comment - make yourself visible to the rest of the people in the room. If you just sit in the corner, nobody will notice you and you won't ever get the job. Group interviews are less to test your knowledge and capability, and more to assess your communications skills and initiative. If there is a group activity, jump in and take the lead - if someone else tries to, challenge them at every opportunity, or provide something additional to what they said, whether or not you think they deserve to be challenged.

    You mentioned 20 applications - this really isn't enough. One thing you could do is be proactive in sending cover letters / CVs for internships work experience. For example, I have gained 3 internships (1 paid, 1 expenses paid, and 1 unpaid) from large consultancies, purely by sending speculative applications saying that I am a student very interested in the area, and providing my CV.

    There's other stuff to say but I'm sure other people will, or already have covered most of it.

    Good luck with your applications And remember, failed job applications aren't the end of the world (although it might seem like it at the time). You will make it eventually. Also remember that the first internship is the hardest to get - every subsequent application you can mention your previous experience. Gradually you will build up enough experience to apply for a job.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Flying Pig)
    Why don't you write the CV yourself? It's better they know you, as they are employing you and not your father.

    Just wondering...
    Sorry if I'm butting in, but I agree with this.

    I typed down and designed my own CV, and a local radio station offered me a job as part of their production crew. Sure I asked my dad how to write a proper CV, but I did the rest.
    I'm not trying to sound childish (for the OP) but having a creative print out of your CV might just stand out from the rest. And as for the attitude, smile, and boast a bit about how good you can be.

    But I'm only 19. I assume that you might want to listen to more mature people
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mikeyup)
    x
    Well, that was quite a rant.

    I'm pretty sure no one here wants to bully you... They're just telling your their view.

    As for the fact that you only send 20 applications a year. I can only quote the people before me: Seriously? 20? Of course you can't be expected to have the qualifications for 500 jobs around you. But frankly - apply for everything! Even if it's just giving you some practice in interviews. Can't hurt. And there's nothing wrong with waitressing or things like that - better than sitting at home and doing nothing.

    I may be only 23 but I have worked constantly since I'm 16. And I've just finished a LLB with no problems. I've worked in HR and am now working in a record label. I can tell you that there are degrees that will never help you with your career. Sadly most of the music degrees are like that. Unless you have studied an instrument of course... But if you did you'll hardly get a job in the music industry. No one will employ someone who'll do nothing else than annoy A&R by constantly bringing demos into the office...

    To help you further it would help if you stated what exactly you were studying.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mikeyup)

    I would like the posters to give me a list of 10 different things to do in the next 7 days which might aid me in getting a job apart from the regular applying for work. I will do them and let you know how I get on. Suggest anything that you think might help. It will give me something to do and also give me new ideas for job hunting.



    Sorry for the long post in which I moan and rant and rave as if I am the only one with these problems. I am not.

    Thanks for your help.
    I can only think of three things. Your only real problems seem to be your lack of confidence and your defeatist attitude. My first point addeses the former the second two the latter.

    1. Do something that will help challenge your fear of social situations. Join a club, go out somewhere by yourself with the intention of talking to a stranger. The only way you are ever going to become more self confident is with practice. The way the world works is not going to change, but you can.

    2. Find out what SEND is...find out if it is something that you can get, how it will help your career etc. That little section of your post implies a lot about your attitude, and it is not a good attitude to have.

    3. Apply for a job that you are not qualified for. In your cover letter say that you have no experience and be completely honest: tell them that you are hard working blah blah blah. It could make a refreshing change for the person reading your CV and could get you an interview.

    I have soooooo many holes to pick but, at your request, I am not going to. All I will say is: as you have experienced at University, people do grow up. All personalities are accepted. You will find the same is true at work. You need to do the same as what you are expecting from others: start accpeting and seeing potential friendships in all different kinds of people. Including those who fit the mould of people who used to bully you in the past.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    OK OP first I'm older than you and have years of work experience before I was made redundant. I also managed to get a part time job so I was applying from an employed status. Fact is most employers don't reply to applications. A 25% rate of getting a reply is excellent, mine was more like <1% from almost 1000 applications. It IS hard right now and takes time to get a job.

    Now for the advice

    1) I know you don't want to hear it but you do have to apply for more jobs.

    2) Have a search plan for looking for jobs to apply for and follow it each week day. eg start for searching for jobs you most want to do, apply for any. Once applications done or if there are no new jobs that day then search for the type of job you'd next most like to do and work down your list.

    3) Before filling in your application read the spec for each job and match it up to your own skills/experience. Highlight where you meet their spec in your personal statement or cover letter which ever applies.

    4)Edit your CV yourself for each application to highlight the most relevant points as in 3 above.

    5) Write a new cover letter for each application where relevant, tailored to the job.

    6) Research the company and job so you have the information to answer questions.

    7) Grab any chance you edit to gain experience.

    8) Proof read all applications before sending to avoid sending them out with typos etc.

    9) Follow up applications by e-mail if possible, ask for feedback when you get rejections, it gives you something to work on.

    10) Research companies who could use your skills and send speculative letters to them asking if they have any positions available

    11) Keep doing all of above, improve on points from feedback where you can and never give up. It can take time, just keep plodding.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Michael, it's really difficult but you just have to keep plugging away at it knowing that there are lots of us in the same situation. Ask your family and people you know for contacts. The job centre can refer you for work experience placements that last a number of weeks - they're unpaid but you'll continue to receive your allowance and you'll have something to show for your proactivity. Sometimes all it takes is a foot in the door and unfortunately in this era you have to be aggressive: phone the company prior to applying so that you can become acquainted with the person who will be assessing it, and potentially interviewing you. Chase things up if you haven't heard back within a few days, if you're registered with any recruitment agencies, keep pestering them etc. You're obviously very capable and you will get a job if you keep pushing for it. I'm not very outgoing myself and I hate doing this but the thought of moving out and having a job and a new life keeps spurring me on.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Companies like Royal Mail, G4S(or any event security company) offer a casual contract (0 hour contract) which are easy to get from my experience.

    That way your building up experience, while tying to get somewhere better.





 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources

    Articles and guides:

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    CGI logo

    CGI is open for applications

    "Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    ICAEW logo

    Merck

    "Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

    Army logo

    The Army is recruiting now

    "With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Quick links:

    Unanswered career sector and employment threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.