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I love economics, I'm obsessed with economics, this is what I want to do but... Watch

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    There are two options available to you: improve your mathematical skill or do another course.
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    (Original post by CoolStoryBroo)
    Politics is completely different from economics. If you wanna be an economist then you have no other option but to do economics.

    I've just had a look on that UCL Politics moudles and the only economics moudles you do is a brief micro & macro. Which is like equivilent to AS economics. Unless you wanna go into a career like banking then getting into a good univeristy that doesn't require A-Levels maths is your best bet since being an economist isn't as competitive as getting into banking.
    (Original post by Lunch_Box)
    Hi,

    If you cannot do maths, then you can simply not do economics.

    Have you considered PPE? It is one of the best courses available, and may suit you incredibly well.
    (Original post by InPiscinam)
    I think he/she's talking about your physical ability to cope with advanced economics if you can't cope with basic maths!


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    (Original post by CoolStoryBroo)
    If a uni doesn't require you to have A-Level maths then they obviously expect GCSE maths knoledge then work upwards from there.





    It was an incorrect reply though, OP obviously has an economics fetish and the guy was giving him **** advice




    Lol it was slightly cheesy, but i think everyone goes through a phase when they realise they like economics then the feeling gradually gets weaker when it's exam season, mine was last summer
    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    I got a B at GCSE maths. I did struggle abit at University on a BSC but it was ok. It just takes you longer to work things out. Dont get me wrong its difficult but not impossible.
    (Original post by Vince xD)
    ... studying economics at a Russel Group University won't get you into Investment Banking, unfortunately. You need to be at the top 5. Even then it's a struggle.

    Since when was the advice of a guy named 'CoolStoryBro' on an Internet forum valuable?
    (Original post by Alex-Torres)
    Just a bit of an anecdote:

    My brother got a B in GCSE Maths, and did one module in Ecnomics at St Andrew's University. Needless to say, he failed because the maths was too hard.

    Just go for the BA, be brutally honest with your self, will you be able to cope on a course with hardcore maths - with people who've taken F.Maths - and you only have a C at GCSE?
    (Original post by tashamoses95)
    Hey Jack. Ok so, i do A level Maths, Further Maths, Economics & Physics.
    I'm not so sure about economics at university.
    But honestly, there is hardly any maths at all involved in the a level, and when it does come up, it is just simple adding and subtracting, so i can't imagine it is THAT much different within the modules you are taking, especially as seen as it's not a pure economics course.
    i'll say go for it! If it's what you want to do, don't let maths pull you back!

    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    I'd suggest looking for political economy degrees, or PPE if you prefer. You will struggle with the maths in a pure economics degree (not to say most won't take you on with a C and no maths A level). That's not to say that you can't deal with economic issues, however. Otherwise, you could try to see if you can get on to politics and economics joint honours on the understanding that you drop the economics if you can't handle it and switch to single honours in second year.

    The UCL course is a really interesting one, by the way, if you decide to stick with it.
    (Original post by TooIntelligent)
    Noone is "terrible" at maths. All you have to do is practice and you will get better at it. Saying you are terrible is just an excuse for being lazy. Very few people manage to do well in maths without effort and practice.

    None of you have read the OP carefully.

    1) He already has a university (UCL) and a course (LR27) and he is sticking to it - so why are you even talking about Investment Banking, PPE, pure Econ etc?

    2) It is a BA course

    3) The OP is willing to learn some maths/practice etc - what he is essentially asking if he's gonna manage with the modules he linked.


    - Personally, studying pure BS Economics I can state that there is a lot of maths involved and yes you will frankly struggle without not getting at least A in your AS/A2 Maths, not to mention further maths.

    When it comes to your degree, I think it might be somehow similar to PPE actually. I might be wrong.
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    (Original post by Evie Ninnenbaum)
    None of you have read the OP carefully.

    1) He already has a university (UCL) and a course (LR27) and he is sticking to it - so why are you even talking about Investment Banking, PPE, pure Econ etc?

    2) It is a BA course

    3) The OP is willing to learn some maths/practice etc - what he is essentially asking if he's gonna manage with the modules he linked.


    - Personally, studying pure BS Economics I can state that there is a lot of maths involved and yes you will frankly struggle without not getting at least A in your AS/A2 Maths, not to mention further maths.

    When it comes to your degree, I think it might be somehow similar to PPE actually. I might be wrong.
    BA Economy as a part of Politics degree shouldn't be that challenging.
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    (Original post by tashamoses95)
    Hey Jack. Ok so, i do A level Maths, Further Maths, Economics & Physics.
    I'm not so sure about economics at university.
    But honestly, there is hardly any maths at all involved in the a level, and when it does come up, it is just simple adding and subtracting, so i can't imagine it is THAT much different within the modules you are taking, especially as seen as it's not a pure economics course.
    i'll say go for it! If it's what you want to do, don't let maths pull you back!

    Hi, I do the same A levels as you + Chemistry.

    I have done a bit of research on this as I was worried I might dislike Economics at university but from my research of looking at modules and homeworks/exams students have to do, it seems more a fit for me. Economics hardly contains any Maths at A-level but it becomes much more mathematical especially if you're doing a Bsc. It isn't simple adding and subtracting but I'm not sure it'll advance that much more than A-level maths.
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    Get some outside maths help (specifically for economics related problems) - looking into BA Economic History might be an idea (heard there's a lot less maths than in pure economics etc)
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    (Original post by CoolStoryBroo)
    Politics is completely different from economics. If you wanna be an economist then you have no other option but to do economics.

    I've just had a look on that UCL Politics moudles and the only economics moudles you do is a brief micro & macro. Which is like equivilent to AS economics. Unless you wanna go into a career like banking then getting into a good univeristy that doesn't require A-Levels maths is your best bet since being an economist isn't as competitive as getting into banking.
    UCL economics module as AS economics? Maybe he would be better off just reading everything from Adam Smith onwards and not bother with a uni curriculum.

    Can you understand economics without maths? I don't know, never did it.

    He seems to be interested how economy works in general, you know like deficit/debt/growth/recession/crisis/trade/nhs/gdp... I don't think he has any money making ambitions, but hey it might be the opposite.
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    (Original post by WannabeEconomist)
    Hello my name is Jack. My username states & thread title states it all but the problem is that I'm extraordinarily bad at Maths.

    I got a C in my GCSE with a real struggle. Well indeed throughout high school I wasn't even doing my maths homework, I was often skipping lessons as well because I hated my set 3 class full of degenerates that bullied me.

    I got A/A* English and other humanities as I'm a typical humanist and for my A level I did Law, Philosophy, Politics and History.

    Throughout AS/A2 I had an Economic fetish of approaching everything as an Economist would do - for example always doing my history arguments focusing on an Economic aspect or Politics essays emphasizing on Economic factors. I fell in love.

    However, I've never considered myself fit for Economics at university therefore applied for BA Politics to several institutions (most of which included Economic modules to be tempted to choose!)

    Now I actually hold an offer from UCL for the following: Politics & East European Studies (LR27) http://www.ssees.ucl.ac.uk/bapees.htm

    There are the Economic modules but "highly recommended that students taking this have A Level Maths"






    Now, the reason tells me that I should avoid it as I might drop out within the first term from UCL.

    My passion tells me I should go for it as this is the subject that I want to have an intellectual battle against for the ongoing 3 years. Get to understand the causes of things, be able to live like a free thinking individual! I'm actually thinking about reading some economics now, as I did yesterday, the day before that, and a year ago, as opposed to doing my history revision.

    I ♥ Economics! I really do. My maths, in the meantime, is terrible. What would Economists recommend me to do: forget about it? Get to studying Maths/Economics on my own before the course starts? Any particular books/mathematical websites?

    Thank you the great Economic minds of TSR!
    I don't know how relevant it is if you're already holding an offer from UCL (and congrats! You might see my dad there ) but I think Manchester accepts people into it's economics program without maths. They give you pretty aggressive remedial maths lessons in your first term though, I think.
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    (Original post by Alex-Torres)
    Just a bit of an anecdote:

    My brother got a B in GCSE Maths, and did one module in Ecnomics at St Andrew's University. Needless to say, he failed because the maths was too hard.

    Just go for the BA, be brutally honest with your self, will you be able to cope on a course with hardcore maths - with people who've taken F.Maths - and you only have a C at GCSE?
    Was his Economics module only a module within an Art degree, or Science?

    Sounds like a horrible story...
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    (Original post by WalkingTolerance)
    Was his Economics module only a module within an Art degree, or Science?

    Sounds like a horrible story...
    It was just one module - he was studying a degree in Computer Science, and is graduating next year.
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    Economics is strictly connected to maths. However, it is only connected to some mathematical areas. So I'd say you need maths anyway, but you should approach it from an economical point of view. I guess for a beginner level this is best done on microeconomics. Say for example, when you learn how to differentiate, connect differentiation with the theory of the firm and costs and revenues. Look at a simple graph with say an added tax to supply and try finding all the different areas ( changes in consumer surplus, producer surplus etc.)
    You can't really fully understand economics without maths. Plus, you haven't really done any economics in school, and this is why you might find it so attractive. For example, I did economics for my exams and I always thought history and politics were more attractive. That is because I did not have the classes, and I did not have to do any coursework. Maybe pick up some A level economics books and start reading through them. If you consider them to be boring, and you can't read more than a couple of chapters at a time, then maybe econ isn't for you.
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    Can't you do BA Economics?
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    (Original post by Vince xD)
    ... studying economics at a Russel Group University won't get you into Investment Banking, unfortunately. You need to be at the top 5. Even then it's a struggle.

    Since when was the advice of a guy named 'CoolStoryBro' on an Internet forum valuable?
    Incorrect. You can still get into IB even if you attend a University outside of the top 5.
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    If you love Economics then i advise that you do that.

    I'm in a similar situation to you in that i'm doing Economics but only got a C in GCSE Maths and to be honest i find Maths a bit tedious however the Maths involved in Economics for me (not a RG uni) has just being algebra and statistics, nothing that you shouldn't have done at the higher end of GCSE Maths.

    If your just looking at going to a Russel Group uni then take the course at UCL but if not then go for Economics a bit further down and just make up the prestige with a Masters.
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    (Original post by Evie Ninnenbaum)
    None of you have read the OP carefully.

    1) He already has a university (UCL) and a course (LR27) and he is sticking to it - so why are you even talking about Investment Banking, PPE, pure Econ etc?

    2) It is a BA course

    3) The OP is willing to learn some maths/practice etc - what he is essentially asking if he's gonna manage with the modules he linked.



    - Personally, studying pure BS Economics I can state that there is a lot of maths involved and yes you will frankly struggle without not getting at least A in your AS/A2 Maths, not to mention further maths.

    When it comes to your degree, I think it might be somehow similar to PPE actually. I might be wrong.
    Wow, first post where the person has read what the OP has said.
    I was reading through and realized no-one was "listening"
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    (Original post by Vince xD)
    ... studying economics at a Russel Group University won't get you into Investment Banking, unfortunately. You need to be at the top 5. Even then it's a struggle.

    Since when was the advice of a guy named 'CoolStoryBro' on an Internet forum valuable?
    My arse. I knew someone who got into IB from Southampton.

    Going to a top 5 helps, but going to a lesser uni doesn't make it impossible.
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    (Original post by Evie Ninnenbaum)
    None of you have read the OP carefully.

    1) He already has a university (UCL) and a course (LR27) and he is sticking to it - so why are you even talking about Investment Banking, PPE, pure Econ etc?

    2) It is a BA course

    3) The OP is willing to learn some maths/practice etc - what he is essentially asking if he's gonna manage with the modules he linked.


    - Personally, studying pure BS Economics I can state that there is a lot of maths involved and yes you will frankly struggle without not getting at least A in your AS/A2 Maths, not to mention further maths.

    When it comes to your degree, I think it might be somehow similar to PPE actually. I might be wrong.
    I did read it. I made the (incorrect?) inference that since the OP was banging on about economics so much (essentially 'I applied for politics because I thought I wasn't good enough for economics'), that they may not have been entirely happy with their choice of course and was looking for some kind of reassurance that they had made the correct long-term choice. As a political economist, I thought saying 'you don't have to do economics to do economics' might be valuable. And nah - Politics and CEE studies isn't really much like PPE other than the fact that it has politics in it, but I'm sure the OP can do political economy oriented modules (CEE specialists tend to go in for them in a big way).

    Anyway. Disregarding that, if the modules are just intro to macro/micro then I suspect the University have a blurb about A-level maths to cover their arses in case people fail and complain about not being warned. I think the broader question is whether that's actually such a big deal in the first year. It's basically your only opportunity to try stuff out without suffering dreadful consequences if you muck it up.

    So personally I'd say why not. But that's just me.
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    OP don't worry about some of the exaggeration you get on the internet. A lot of people especially economists like to try and make out their degree is the hardest most maths filled degree you will ever see.

    To do an undergraduate economics degree you do not need to be a mathematical genius. You need a base level. If your maths is not that great you need to get it up to this base level. If you are willing to put some self learning in yourself over the summer before you start it is feasible.

    I recommend getting Iain Jacques book, Mathematics for Economics and Business. Get an older version if you want on amazon cheaply. This is basically a teach yourself from scratch guide to the basics you will need to start an economics degree. It assumes very little pre knowledge and it doesn't cover maths that you will never need to use. I would recommend working through the whole book, and doing the exercises to test yourself. If you work through that book you will be fine. Its not advanced stuff, but you will have the base level.

    Then if you want to teach yourself some stats get Michael Barrow's book, Statistics for Economics, Accounting and Business Studies. With this one you don't really need to go through the whole book before you start just the first few chapters so you know what hypothesis tests, confidence intervals etc are.
 
 
 
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